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HEALTH
June 1, 2009 | By Lillian Hawthorne
A year ago I was diagnosed with COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a catch-all label for many different breathing problems. My particular situation is that my lungs are compressed and cannot expand sufficiently to provide needed oxygen. There is no medication or surgery or therapy for this; the only treatment is to provide oxygen artificially from an external source. This means that I must rely on a large device called a concentrator, which transmits oxygen through a plastic tether inserted in the nostrils.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna and Kate Mather
Some medical experts said that the teenage stowaway who survived a flight from San Jose to Hawaii in the wheel well of a jet is lucky to be alive. The 16-year-old had run away from home when he climbed the fence on Sunday morning and crawled into the left rear wheel well of  Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45. Authorities called it a “miracle” that the teen survived the 5 1/2-hour flight. The wheel well of the  Boeing  767 is not pressurized or heated, meaning the teen possibly endured extremely thin air and temperatures as low 80 degrees below zero when it cruised at 38,000 feet.
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NATIONAL
November 4, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. - When Harry Perez looks at the red plastic canister on his back porch, he sees more than five gallons of unleaded; he sees six more hours his bedridden daughter, Catherine, can keep breathing. This is the cold calculus Hurricane Sandy has wrought for the Perez family. Every 24 hours the family's network of relatives breaks out across Long Island in search for gas. Five days since Sandy's winds toppled thousands of power lines and tidal surges flooded electrical stations, 50% of homes on the island are still without power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Los Angeles County will pay $7.5 million to the formerly homeless mother of a child born at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center who said that negligence by medical staff resulted in brain damage to her baby. The case was filed on behalf of 1-year-old Micah Welch by his mother. The mother, Dyrene Loftis, 25, alleged that because of poor medical care, she suffered a ruptured uterus that caused a lack of oxygen to the child during his delivery. The settlement was finalized Tuesday in a unanimous vote by the county's Board of Supervisors.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Oxygen problems that have plagued the Air Force's fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets may be worse than previously disclosed, according to new information released by two members of Congress. F-22 pilots have reported dozens of incidents in which the jet's systems weren't feeding them enough oxygen, causing hypoxia-like symptoms in the air. Hypoxia is a condition resulting from a deficiency of oxygen reaching tissues of the body that can cause nausea, headaches, fatigue or even blackouts.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | From staff and wire reports
The Federal Aviation Administration said that it will permanently ban the transportation of oxygen generators in the cargo holds of passenger aircraft, effective today. The rule grew out of the May 11 crash of a ValuJet DC-9 in the Florida Everglades after a fire in the cargo hold, believed to have been sparked by oxygen canisters. All 110 aboard were killed. Cargo compartments on earlier-model aircraft like the ValuJet DC-9 are lined with flame-retardant material.
NEWS
January 14, 1993 | Associated Press
The rarefied atmosphere of this mountain resort can take your breath away. So why not have a bottle of oxygen handy? Lowlanders who suffer mild altitude sickness are the target of an emergency medical technician-cum-entrepreneur who wants city permission to hawk oxygen. Susan Blatt, 26, asked City Council members this week to allow her to sell oxygen from vending carts. Currently, outdoor vending is permitted only for food services and rafting companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2012 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
The police officers who pummeled Kelly Thomas during a violent encounter last summer in Fullerton caused his death by cutting off the flow of oxygen to his brain when the fight intensified and they piled on the homeless man, a coroner's pathologist testified Tuesday. Dr. Aruna Singhania, who told the court she had performed 11,000 autopsies, said the difficulty Thomas had breathing because of chest compression as the struggle wore on was worsened by facial and nasal bleeding. The testimony came in the second day of a preliminary hearing that has orbited around a graphic and disturbing video of Thomas' being hit by police outside the bus depot in downtown Fullerton.
WORLD
August 29, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Air safety officials confirmed suspicions that an oxygen cylinder caused the explosion that blew a car-sized hole in a Qantas jet last month, forcing an emergency landing. Julian Walsh, acting executive director of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, said one of the seven emergency oxygen cylinders below the cabin floor had exploded on the Boeing 747-438. The cause of the explosion has not been determined.
SCIENCE
September 29, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Oxygen began to appear on Earth millions of years earlier than scientists had thought, researchers reported Friday in the journal Science. An analysis of a deep rock core from Australia indicates the presence of at least some oxygen 50 million to 100 million years before the great change when the life-giving element began rising to today's levels. Previously, the earliest indications of oxygen had been from 2.3 billion to 2.4 billion years ago.
SCIENCE
June 20, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The hairy-chested Yeti crab, which survives in an environment of no light, little oxygen, extreme temperatures and tremendous pressure, may not be able to survive a warming ocean, scientists say. The alien-like crab -- nicknamed the "Hoff" in honor of David Hasselhoff's similarly hairy torso -- was discovered in 2009, living on the perimeter of hydrothermal vents thousands of feet beneath the Indian and Arctic oceans. The area around the hydrothermal vents is beyond extreme. The vents heat the water to temperatures of 716 degrees Fahrenheit and spew plumes of noxious chemicals, creating an acidic environment with high levels of heavy metals and hydrogen sulfide.
HEALTH
April 20, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
Even the most jaded fitness aficionados (of which L.A. has plenty) would have to admit Santa Monica's exclusive new Iobella studio resembles nothing else they've seen before. With its Plexiglas heated workout pods and triple-oxygen spa cabins, it is as much spa as it is boutique gym. And that's exactly the appeal for its small circle of posh clients, who shell out thousands of dollars (the owner wouldn't be specific) for a customized program that includes a personal training plan, a dietitian on call and relaxing cucumbers-over-the-eyes sessions in those O3 pods, which are supposed to soften skin and muscles after your workout.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Oxygen has evidently decided rapper Shawty Lo's busy personal life isn't worth the grief. The cable network confirmed Tuesday that it was pulling the plug on "All My Babies' Mamas," a controversial proposed special starring the flamboyant rapper, whose real name is Carlos Walker and who has 11 children by 10 different women. “As part of our development process, we have reviewed casting and decided not to move forward with the special," a network representative said in a statement.
OPINION
December 12, 2012 | By Barry Goldman
LANSING, Mich. - I'm a 60-year-old lawyer and part-time law professor. Chanting slogans is not my preferred method of discourse. But on Tuesday, I was in the streets of Lansing marching and chanting myself hoarse. I make my living as a labor arbitrator. I've spent the last 20 years sitting as a neutral third party in disputes between employers and unions. It is an adversarial system, and discussions are often heated. But the system works because the parties meet as equals. It wouldn't work if either party were able to dominate.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
A Southwest Airlines flight from Kansas City to Dallas on Saturday lost cabin pressure, forcing passengers and crew to wear oxygen masks for about 20 minutes until the plane had descended to a safe altitude. No injuries were reported on Flight 3201, which landed safely at Love Field in Dallas, spokeswoman Whitney Eichinger told the Associated Press. The flight, carrying 124 passengers and a crew of five, lost pressure at 35,000 feet. The masks deployed and about 20 minutes later, the craft descended below 10,000 feet.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2012 | By Brian Bennett and Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. - When Harry Perez looks at the red plastic canister on his back porch, he sees more than five gallons of unleaded. He sees six more hours that his bedridden daughter Catherine can continue breathing with the aid of an oxygen machine. This is the cold calculus that super storm Sandy has wrought for the Perez family. Five days after Sandy's winds toppled thousands of power lines and tidal surges flooded electrical stations, half the homes on Long Island remained without power Saturday, and long lines persisted to buy gasoline for cars and generators.
WORLD
July 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Australia's Civil Aviation Safety Authority said Qantas was ordered to quickly inspect every oxygen container aboard its fleet of 30 Boeing 747s. A missing oxygen tank is suspected of causing a large hole in a jumbo jet forced to make an emergency landing Friday in the Philippines with more than 350 people aboard. Aviation authority spokesman Peter Gibson said possible causes of the blast could include metal fatigue in the cylinder, a failure of the regulator valve, a puncture or overheating.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2006 | From Associated Press
Coal mine operators will soon have to store extra oxygen supplies underground and let federal officials know about accidents more quickly, the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration said Tuesday. The agency expects to publish a new emergency rule for mines within the next two weeks, agency spokesman Dirk Fillpot said. The agency issues emergency rules only rarely. They go into effect immediately, which is a departure from the typical, lengthy federal rulemaking process.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
VALLEY STREAM, N.Y. - When Harry Perez looks at the red plastic canister on his back porch, he sees more than five gallons of unleaded; he sees six more hours his bedridden daughter, Catherine, can keep breathing. This is the cold calculus Hurricane Sandy has wrought for the Perez family. Every 24 hours the family's network of relatives breaks out across Long Island in search for gas. Five days since Sandy's winds toppled thousands of power lines and tidal surges flooded electrical stations, 50% of homes on the island are still without power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2012 | Steve Lopez
On the evening of July 2, Bill Bentinck, 87, was led from his Palm Springs home in handcuffs, in mourning and in shock. The body of his wife of 25 years, Lynda, was still in the house, but there was no time to grieve. After telling police that his terminally ill wife had chosen to disconnect her oxygen supply and put an end to her suffering from emphysema, he was arrested on suspicion of murder. Bentinck, a straight-talking man in the Jimmy Stewart mold, felt that he had made a difficult but compassionate choice in honoring his wife's last wish and not reconnecting the oxygen.
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