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Ozzie And Harriet

NEWS
July 24, 1998 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days are numbered for one of Laguna Beach's celebrity houses, the former oceanfront home of Ozzie and Harriet Nelson. Come October, if all goes according to plan, the three-bedroom, single-story house perched atop a bluff in the gated neighborhood of Lagunita will be razed. Tony and Jane Ciabattoni, the new owners, will then begin building a two-story, Italian country house reminiscent of those on the southern coast of Italy. Designed by Newport Beach architect Brion S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1997 | JERRY HICKS
It was a perfect little paradise for a wedding. Except that I'd promised the out-of-town guests a picturesque lake of blue fronting the seminary where we were married. Instead the water was a foot thick with ice, covered with so much snow you couldn't tell the lawn from the lake. I should have remembered how cold Minnesota could get in November. . . . Please pardon a column smothered with hugs and kisses. Today is my 20th wedding anniversary.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Dole divorced Phyllis a long time ago. But Phyllis (who married a rancher from Kansas, then wed her old high school sweetheart when the rancher died) says she's always liked Bob's second wife, Elizabeth. Bob and Phyllis' daughter, Robin, considers Elizabeth one of her best friends and has brunch with them every Sunday in Washington when she can.
NEWS
October 9, 1994 | PETER H. KING
Harriet Nelson had died, and somehow it seemed appropriate last week to visit the house. Across 14 television seasons, this graceful Cape Cod Colonial had served both as the Nelson family home and as an exterior prop for "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet." It was painted white then. Today, the wood siding is blue. There were white picket fences in the show. Today, the house is surrounded by a barrier of black iron. Signs hung from the fence deliver a warning: "Armed Response."
REAL ESTATE
August 18, 1991 | GORDON DILLOW, Dillow is a La Canada Flintridge free-lance writer
It's a sunny Saturday afternoon in Montrose. Along a winding, leafy village lane the local merchants have set out their wares on sidewalk tables. Young couples pass by pushing baby strollers, while elderly couples walk by arm in arm. Teen-agers are packed into the red leatherette booths at a local malt shop called the Rocky Cola Cafe, wolfing down burgers and Cokes, while younger kids are ricocheting around the sidewalks, laughing and screaming.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990
Re Howard Rosenberg's "Remembering the Lenny Bruce of TV Sitcoms": There are several reasons why "All in the Family" was a success. First of all, though Archie Bunker was a distasteful person he was nonetheless a real person, not some cardboard, near-perfect character like Cliff Huxtable. As a result, you could relate to him. Though Archie had several disagreeable qualities, underneath his hard-headed exterior there was genuine affection and sensitivity. Secondly, though "All in the Family" was a comedy, it was not afraid to tackle controversial and serious social and human issues, like rape, prejudice, death, abortion, feminism and homosexuality, dispelling myths and enlightening us in its own special way. Unlike most situation comedies before and after it, "All in the Family" didn't idealize the American family.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The small-town atmosphere in "Staying Together," set in Ridgeway, S.C., is humid with metaphorical meaning. The streets are a bit too quaint; the homes too ramshackle; the people too countrified and ornery. If you think you've seen it all before--well, you have. And that's the point. The movie (citywide) is englobed in the sentimentality of a hundred rural coming-of age dramas, and the familiarity breeds not contempt but boredom.
NEWS
June 3, 1989 | DENNIS McLELLAN, Times Staff Writer
With a cool breeze blowing in off the steel-gray ocean below, Harriet Nelson stood on the deck of her cliff-top Laguna Beach house and remembered warmer days. "Ozzie would swim way out past the rocks, and then he'd swim all the way down there," she said, pointing to the rocks off Victoria Beach to the north and then down to Blue Lagoon a half mile to the south. "When we first came down here he'd swim twice a day and play volleyball with all the kids," she said, adding with a throaty laugh: "He'd knock his brains out. Ozzie had to win, you know.
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