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P J O Rourke

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NEWS
November 16, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Don't laugh--you'll just encourage him. And if there's one thing concerned citizens have no business encouraging, it's a self-described "investigative humorist" with so little respect for the deep seriousness of our troubled world. Read any piece in journalist P. J. O'Rourke's latest collection, "Holidays in Hell," and you'll encounter things you shouldn't find funny. Regardless of your moral or political leanings, you're bound to come across something ideologically incorrect.
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NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Tribune Newspapers
P.J. O'Rourke has written so many books of humor that no one is quite sure how many. I have it on good authority that it's 15, but since I finished writing this sentence, he may have written yet another. That's how fast he is. I've enjoyed O'Rourke's off-the-wall writing going back to his Harvard Lampoon days. In his collaborations with Douglas Kenney, he helped birth the subversive humor of the 1970s - before going solo with pieces for Vanity Fair, Playboy and an especially long association with Rolling Stone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last February, facing a challenge from a new Sunday night edition of "Dateline NBC," "60 Minutes" executive producer Don Hewitt announced the first changes on the CBS newsmagazine in many years. In addition to adding more breaking-news stories to the mix, three prominent commentators from print journalism--Molly Ivins, P.J. O'Rourke and Stanley Crouch--were hired to do weekly commentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010
"Give Us Liberty: A Tea Party Manifesto" by Dick Armey and Matt Kibbe (William Morrow: 266 pp., $19.99) "History," explain Dick Armey and Matt Kibbe, "teaches us that nothing could be more American than protest. " In this book, they connect that spirit of protest with the "tea party" movement, which Kibbe (chief executive of the smaller government advocacy group FreedomWorks) defines as being "built on a coherent, unifying set of values ? that go back to the revolutionary traditions of our founding as a nation.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | NIKKI FINKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Amy: Help! On second thought, make that: Help, please! Ms. Vanderbilt, you must be turning over in your grave because of the problems that polite society is suffering as we enter the '90s. I mean, as manners go, I'm not exactly a model of decorum. (I take special pleasure in cutting off Camaros on the freeway).
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Tribune Newspapers
P.J. O'Rourke has written so many books of humor that no one is quite sure how many. I have it on good authority that it's 15, but since I finished writing this sentence, he may have written yet another. That's how fast he is. I've enjoyed O'Rourke's off-the-wall writing going back to his Harvard Lampoon days. In his collaborations with Douglas Kenney, he helped birth the subversive humor of the 1970s - before going solo with pieces for Vanity Fair, Playboy and an especially long association with Rolling Stone.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | S. J. DIAMOND
Running counter to all trends in housekeeping literature, humorist J. O'Rourke has reissued "The Bachelor Home Companion: A Practical Guide to Keeping House Like a Pig." We're not in household-hint land anymore: The book is against cleaning, for dirt and pro-clutter. This is the DUI school of literature, written with what's known as broad humor and laced with drunk jokes and vocabulary from the author's happy days at prep school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Political satirist and author P.J. O'Rourke will give a lecture and sign copies of his new book, "The Empire of the Sofa," Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley. O'Rourke, who has written for "National Lampoon," "Rolling Stone" and "Saturday Night Live," will speak at 11 a.m. and sign his book during a two-hour luncheon. Tickets are $50, including lunch. For information, call 522-2977.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | Peter Haldeman
The household hint industry is nothing if not resourceful in its quest for new, previously unpublished pointers. Would you have thought of this? "Break (dryer lint) up and put it into the cups of an empty egg carton. Melt paraffin and pour it over the entire carton, being sure to fill all the cups. When wax is dry and hard, break the carton into two sections and put them on top of the charcoal or wood to start (your barbecue)."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2007 | Lee Drutman, Special to The Times
ADAM SMITH is an Enlightenment-era moral philosopher best known for writing "The Wealth of Nations," a founding text of modern economics that checks in at more than 900 dense pages -- enough to discourage many a would-be reader. P.J. O'Rourke is an impudent political satirist with a penchant for quippy one-liners, best known for such books as "Parliament of Whores" and "Give War a Chance."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2007 | Lee Drutman, Special to The Times
ADAM SMITH is an Enlightenment-era moral philosopher best known for writing "The Wealth of Nations," a founding text of modern economics that checks in at more than 900 dense pages -- enough to discourage many a would-be reader. P.J. O'Rourke is an impudent political satirist with a penchant for quippy one-liners, best known for such books as "Parliament of Whores" and "Give War a Chance."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Political satirist and author P.J. O'Rourke will give a lecture and sign copies of his new book, "The Empire of the Sofa," Friday at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley. O'Rourke, who has written for "National Lampoon," "Rolling Stone" and "Saturday Night Live," will speak at 11 a.m. and sign his book during a two-hour luncheon. Tickets are $50, including lunch. For information, call 522-2977.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last February, facing a challenge from a new Sunday night edition of "Dateline NBC," "60 Minutes" executive producer Don Hewitt announced the first changes on the CBS newsmagazine in many years. In addition to adding more breaking-news stories to the mix, three prominent commentators from print journalism--Molly Ivins, P.J. O'Rourke and Stanley Crouch--were hired to do weekly commentary.
BOOKS
March 3, 1996 | John Balzar
"doughnuts, Limbaugh's consumption of, 27-31 eating, Limbaugh's inability to stop, 14-156, 158 gas, hot, Limbaugh full of, 3, 27, 90 restaurants, Limbaugh's favorite . . . waffle houses 7, 9, 72 self-loathing, Limbaugh's weight as cause of, 47 weather, hot, Limbaugh sweating in, 43, 158, 182 zeppelin, Limbaugh size of, 6, 18, 76, 94 (see also blimp)" --From the spoof index . . "Our era is supposed to be the 1950s all over again. Indeed we are experiencing anew many of the pleasures and benefits of that excellent decade: a salubrious prudery, a sensible avariciousness, a healthy dose of social conformity.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | KINKY FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The only thing more unpleasant than a well-versed liberal is an intelligent conservative. In the case P.J. O'Rourke and "All the Trouble in the World" we have an intelligent conservative who's also effete, sartorially smug, in a state of perpetual preppiness and somewhere to the right of Judge Robert Bork, traveling to Haiti, Somalia, Bangladesh, Vietnam, what used to be Yugoslavia, what used to be Czechoslovakia and what used to be a pristine rain forest before he got there.
BOOKS
October 24, 1993 | Peter Haldeman
The household hint industry is nothing if not resourceful in its quest for new, previously unpublished pointers. Would you have thought of this? "Break (dryer lint) up and put it into the cups of an empty egg carton. Melt paraffin and pour it over the entire carton, being sure to fill all the cups. When wax is dry and hard, break the carton into two sections and put them on top of the charcoal or wood to start (your barbecue)."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010
"Give Us Liberty: A Tea Party Manifesto" by Dick Armey and Matt Kibbe (William Morrow: 266 pp., $19.99) "History," explain Dick Armey and Matt Kibbe, "teaches us that nothing could be more American than protest. " In this book, they connect that spirit of protest with the "tea party" movement, which Kibbe (chief executive of the smaller government advocacy group FreedomWorks) defines as being "built on a coherent, unifying set of values ? that go back to the revolutionary traditions of our founding as a nation.
BOOKS
March 3, 1996 | John Balzar
"doughnuts, Limbaugh's consumption of, 27-31 eating, Limbaugh's inability to stop, 14-156, 158 gas, hot, Limbaugh full of, 3, 27, 90 restaurants, Limbaugh's favorite . . . waffle houses 7, 9, 72 self-loathing, Limbaugh's weight as cause of, 47 weather, hot, Limbaugh sweating in, 43, 158, 182 zeppelin, Limbaugh size of, 6, 18, 76, 94 (see also blimp)" --From the spoof index . . "Our era is supposed to be the 1950s all over again. Indeed we are experiencing anew many of the pleasures and benefits of that excellent decade: a salubrious prudery, a sensible avariciousness, a healthy dose of social conformity.
NEWS
June 21, 1993 | S. J. DIAMOND
Running counter to all trends in housekeeping literature, humorist J. O'Rourke has reissued "The Bachelor Home Companion: A Practical Guide to Keeping House Like a Pig." We're not in household-hint land anymore: The book is against cleaning, for dirt and pro-clutter. This is the DUI school of literature, written with what's known as broad humor and laced with drunk jokes and vocabulary from the author's happy days at prep school.
NEWS
April 24, 1992 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
P.J. O'Rourke, foreign affairs desk chief for Rolling Stone and self-proclaimed Republican Party reptile, dedicates his newest collection of magazine pieces to a man he doesn't know--the poor fool drafted in his place after O'Rourke convinced an Army psychiatrist, in 1970, that extensive drug use made him unfit for military service. That about sums up O'Rourke's brand of humor: mocking on the surface but serious beneath, sharply attuned to quotidian hypocrisy and contradiction.
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