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WORLD
March 16, 2004 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide arrived Monday in Jamaica, prompting Haiti's new prime minister to formally recall his nation's ambassador in protest amid fears that Aristide is plotting a return to power.
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SPORTS
November 20, 1997 | MICHAEL ITAGAKI
When Jamaica qualified for the World Cup last weekend, some members of the Pacific Christian men's soccer team celebrated, although a bit more mildly than their countrymen. Jamaican Prime Minister P.J. Patterson declared Monday a national holiday in celebration of Jamaica's 0-0 tie with Mexico, which qualified the team for the World Cup. He called the achievement, "undoubtedly the greatest day in Jamaica's sporting history."
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a lush, tropical land just a few hundred miles off the U.S. coast where marijuana, though illegal, is a cultural icon worshiped by thousands and so plentiful it goes for just $26 a pound. Now, imagine this place when it's legal. That's precisely what Jamaica's government-appointed National Commission on Ganja has been doing for the last nine months.
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | MATTHEW J. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a hot Caribbean afternoon, and Barry Owens is sweltering in a garage piled high with remnants of the comfortable life he tried to build for his family. "A man can't make any money around here, and when he does it's monkey money--worthless," says the 45-year-old stockbroker, who was born in Jamaica, grew up in England and returned 22 years ago with "great hope."
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most violent campaign in more than a decade, Jamaica holds watershed elections today, marking the probable end of two political dynasties and underlining the nation's turn from radicalism to a moderate, free-market economy. Since Prime Minister P. J. Patterson called parliamentary elections three weeks ago, at least 11 people have been killed in incidents connected to the campaign, and several candidates and political workers have been attacked or threatened.
NEWS
March 15, 1992 | From Reuters
An economic slump has undercut support for Jamaican Prime Minister Michael Manley and led to growing apathy among the island's voters, according to opinion polls and political analysts. Even Manley admits that if elections were held today, his People's National Party probably would lose. But he dismisses that possibility as the result of a natural midterm slump and believes the economy will rebound, restoring voters' faith before elections due in 1994.
WORLD
March 12, 2004 | John-Thor Dahlburg, Times Staff Writer
Angry supporters of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, accusing the United States of having abducted their leader, attempted Thursday to march on the National Palace, seat of Haiti's new leadership, but were driven off by police firing tear-gas grenades. The crowd of 2,000 retreated into the hillside slum neighborhood of Bel Air, smashing car windshields and pillaging the paltry stands of sidewalk merchants.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | MATTHEW J. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A draconian crackdown on gang-related crime helped Jamaica lower its burgeoning murder rate last year. Just don't ask Jamaicans to feel better about it. "I have three guns, and my wife knows how to use them as well," says David Johnson, who lives in the tony Kingston neighborhood of Beverly Hills. "When I go to sleep at night, I keep a loaded gun in arm's reach." Johnson and his neighbors are still haunted by a crime wave last summer that killed 100 people in six weeks.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of miles and a world away from his police chief's office in South Pasadena, Michael Berkow craned over a harried Jamaican police dispatcher Thursday as a command center console crackled nonstop. "Shots fired. Olympic Gardens." "Crowd forming. No ballot boxes." "Barrytown, Montego Bay. No black books."
NEWS
October 10, 1999 | MATTHEW J. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's a hot Caribbean afternoon, and Barry Owens is sweltering in a garage piled high with remnants of the comfortable life he tried to build for his family. "A man can't make any money around here, and when he does it's monkey money--worthless," says the 45-year-old stockbroker, who was born in Jamaica, grew up in England and returned 22 years ago with "great hope."
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