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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1999 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
La-deees and gentlemen . . . and children of all ages! Welcome to the beguiling biopic "P.T. Barnum," an affectionate four-hour film whose best moments are almost as colorful as the quintessential showman himself.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Daniel M. Finley rode into town barely a month ago, and the new president of the Autry National Center is already fixin' for a showdown with Doc Holliday, the Earp brothers and the Clanton gang. The lifesize figures of the OK Corral gunslingers have stood on the Griffith Park museum's lower level since it opened in 1988, in an exhibit representing the famed 1881 shootout in the Arizona Territory town of Tombstone. The problem, Finley says, is that there's no action ? push a button and all you get is an audio account of the gunfight, with lights shining on whichever character is supposed to be speaking.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
"Barnum," the musical about the life of P. T. Barnum, has closed after 11 performances and losses of $2.4 million, the producers said today. The show, a revival of the original 1981 version, suffered scathing reviews, dwindling audiences and technical difficulties. The production, staged under a big-top tent in west London with a 25-member cast and 22-piece orchestra, was to have toured 20 British towns in the summer after its London run.
AUTOS
June 21, 2006 | Chris Erskine, Times Staff Writer
FIRST, some back story. It's World War II, and U.S. carmakers have shifted to more important products -- jeeps and anything else that would help fill the Army's arsenal. With new cars in short supply, dealers become hungrier sharks, having to work harder to sell vehicles that were past their prime. Enter Madman Muntz, who was so young when he began selling cars back in Illinois that his mother had to sign sales papers.
NEWS
March 13, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--If there's a sucker born every minute, showman extraordinaire P. T. Barnum continues to reel 'em in nearly a century after his death. The self-proclaimed "Prince of Humbug"--who brought us 26-inch-tall Gen. Tom Thumb, Jo-Jo the Dog-Faced Boy and Jumbo the Elephant during his entrepreneurial career--is drawing a crowd these days with an exhibit at the New York Historical Society.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jordan Bridges was in fifth grade, he did an oral report on P.T. Barnum, already captivated by the infamous King of the Circus. His father, actor Beau Bridges, helped him find a voice and a costume. Little did he know that 15 years later, he and his father would share a wig of voluminous curls to portray six decades of Barnum in a four-hour miniseries. Being shown Sunday and Monday on A&E, "P.T.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1986 | CHALON SMITH
Buena Park Civic Theater's production of "Barnum" has the charm of a circus calliope: It's brash, noisy, old-fashioned and a bit creaky but exuberant enough to be diverting. The musical recounts key moments in the life of P.T. Barnum, the notorious impresario who pioneered the traveling circus and was instrumental in creating "The Greatest Show on Earth."
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | BILL RYAN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Nearly a century ago, in 1891, impresario P.T. Barnum made his final exit, and unfortunately--certainly for him--it was no hoax. However, Barnum has recently made a comeback in a scenario that could have been concocted by the old prince of humbug himself. It concerns his museum. When Barnum died, he left a building in Bridgeport, Conn., that could only be described as Barnumesque--a bizarre mix of architectural styles topped off by a red-tiled dome.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | GARRET CONDON, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Step right up, ladies and gentlemen, the Barnum Museum is not for suckers. The three floors of the newly refurbished museum located in Bridgeport, Conn., are filled with memorabilia from the life and times of Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891), the father of mass-market entertainment. Welcoming guests to the first floor is a six-foot animated statue of Barnum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | LESLIE EARNEST
Not everyone would consider it great luck to break both legs in a tractor accident. But Cotton Rosser figures it was the best thing that ever happened to him. The former rodeo rider, who will furnish truckloads of livestock for a South County rodeo this weekend, credits an accident that almost cost him use of his legs for boosting him into a career devoted to "keeping Western heritage alive."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1999 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
La-deees and gentlemen . . . and children of all ages! Welcome to the beguiling biopic "P.T. Barnum," an affectionate four-hour film whose best moments are almost as colorful as the quintessential showman himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Jordan Bridges was in fifth grade, he did an oral report on P.T. Barnum, already captivated by the infamous King of the Circus. His father, actor Beau Bridges, helped him find a voice and a costume. Little did he know that 15 years later, he and his father would share a wig of voluminous curls to portray six decades of Barnum in a four-hour miniseries. Being shown Sunday and Monday on A&E, "P.T.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | GREG KRIKORIAN
From the start, the People vs. O.J. Simpson was always more than a murder trial, more than high drama. Too big to contain, it was destined to be a carnival. What happened in the courtroom would captivate the world. What happened outside was a sideshow that P.T. Barnum could not have envisioned. Like a medieval execution, when mobs gathered to wager and gawk only feet from the gallows, the Criminal Courts Building became a marketplace of the bizarre.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1991 | LESLIE EARNEST
Not everyone would consider it great luck to break both legs in a tractor accident. But Cotton Rosser figures it was the best thing that ever happened to him. The former rodeo rider, who will furnish truckloads of livestock for a South County rodeo this weekend, credits an accident that almost cost him use of his legs for boosting him into a career devoted to "keeping Western heritage alive."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1990 | From Times staff and wire service reports
"Barnum," the musical about the life of P. T. Barnum, has closed after 11 performances and losses of $2.4 million, the producers said today. The show, a revival of the original 1981 version, suffered scathing reviews, dwindling audiences and technical difficulties. The production, staged under a big-top tent in west London with a 25-member cast and 22-piece orchestra, was to have toured 20 British towns in the summer after its London run.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | GARRET CONDON, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Step right up, ladies and gentlemen, the Barnum Museum is not for suckers. The three floors of the newly refurbished museum located in Bridgeport, Conn., are filled with memorabilia from the life and times of Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891), the father of mass-market entertainment. Welcoming guests to the first floor is a six-foot animated statue of Barnum.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1988
Regarding the June 26 story on strategies for marketing Pepsi in the Soviet Union ("Pepsi Push Into Soviet Union a Textbook Case in Marketing"): If the Russians are suckers enough to spend their hard-earned rubles on empty calories instead of fruit juice, mineral water, milk, wine or beer, it only proves, as P. T. Barnum said, there's one born every day. It's too bad that Soviet viewers, so starved for abundance, beauty and variety of...
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | GREG KRIKORIAN
From the start, the People vs. O.J. Simpson was always more than a murder trial, more than high drama. Too big to contain, it was destined to be a carnival. What happened in the courtroom would captivate the world. What happened outside was a sideshow that P.T. Barnum could not have envisioned. Like a medieval execution, when mobs gathered to wager and gawk only feet from the gallows, the Criminal Courts Building became a marketplace of the bizarre.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | BILL RYAN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Nearly a century ago, in 1891, impresario P.T. Barnum made his final exit, and unfortunately--certainly for him--it was no hoax. However, Barnum has recently made a comeback in a scenario that could have been concocted by the old prince of humbug himself. It concerns his museum. When Barnum died, he left a building in Bridgeport, Conn., that could only be described as Barnumesque--a bizarre mix of architectural styles topped off by a red-tiled dome.
BOOKS
September 17, 1989 | Ricky Jay, Jay is the author of "Learned Pigs and Fireproof Women" and the host of a forthcoming CBS-TV special of the same name. He is the curator of the Mulholland Library of Conjuring and the Allied Arts in Los Angeles
Welcome to the world of Mysterious Aztecs, Ferocious Zulus, Annamite Dwarfs, Invincible Afghans, Pagan Burmese Priests, the Fejee Mermaid, the Wooly Horse, Tom Thumb, Jenny Lind and the Three Ring Circus. Welcome to the world of a man who counted as his friends or acquaintances Mark Twain, Walt Whitman, Joaquin Muller, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry Ward Beecher, Abraham Lincoln, Queen Victoria and Brigham Young. Welcome to the world of Phineas Taylor Barnum.
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