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Pablo Escobar

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
MEDELLIN, Colombia - The actor's comb-over, the mincing walk, the flat speech cadence and murderous, reptilian glare are all too reminiscent of one of the most powerful criminals who lived. The large number of Colombian eyeballs glued to a new prime-time telenovela about the life and times of Pablo Escobar, highlighted by actor Andrés Parra's bravura performance, shows that the late drug narco still fascinates more than 18 years after he died on a Medellin rooftop in a shoot-out with police.
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WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Richard A. Serrano and Richard Fausset
The residence where Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman apparently had been hiding is a tidy, whitewashed house with spike-topped wrought iron fencing, a heavy metal door and blackened windows. It sits across from a high school and is surrounded by drainage canals that may have been part of a system officials said Guzman used as both a means of escape and to access a network of other homes. Guzman was nothing if not discreet. "I thought the house was empty," a neighbor told The Times on Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2010 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Few things are more prickly and complicated than the relationships between sons and fathers. Just ask Michael Douglas, who spent many troubled years trying to carve out any kind of satisfying kinship with Kirk Douglas, his emotionally distant father. Many political observers believe that part of the impetus for George W. Bush's invasion of Iraq came from a deep-seated desire to set himself apart from the kind of failures that marked his father's, George H.W. Bush, one-term presidency. But when it comes to difficult fathers, few men have endured the kind of emotional burden carried by Sebastian Marroquin, the son of the notorious Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar, whose illicit empire was so vast that he was once estimated to be worth around $25 billion, his cartel controlling the majority of the global cocaine trade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2012 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
MEDELLIN, Colombia - The actor's comb-over, the mincing walk, the flat speech cadence and murderous, reptilian glare are all too reminiscent of one of the most powerful criminals who lived. The large number of Colombian eyeballs glued to a new prime-time telenovela about the life and times of Pablo Escobar, highlighted by actor Andrés Parra's bravura performance, shows that the late drug narco still fascinates more than 18 years after he died on a Medellin rooftop in a shoot-out with police.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of terrorizing Colombia with bombings, kidnapings and assassinations, Pablo Escobar, the world's most notorious drug lord, has stunned his violence-weary countrymen again--this time with an offer to surrender. The announcement, 21 months into the most determined manhunt ever mounted by Colombian police, came last week from an eccentric, 82-year-old Roman Catholic priest who said he met with the billionaire cocaine dealer at a luxurious ranch hide-out and knelt with him in prayer.
NEWS
June 21, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The surrender of Pablo Escobar, the billionaire king of coke, has suddenly changed the nature of Colombia's drug war from an anti-terrorist campaign to a battle in the courts. But few believe it will put an immediate crimp in the flow of cocaine from this top-producer nation to the United States and Europe. Colombian and U.S. officials say this is because Bogota's "drug war" was never primarily a war against drugs, but a war against violence.
NEWS
May 28, 1991 | STAN YARBRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drugdom's most wanted man, Pablo Escobar, is said to be finally planning to surrender after hiding for seven years, masterminding a deadly terrorist campaign and kidnaping some of Colombia's leading citizens. Anyone searching for an explanation for the sudden change of heart by the leader of Colombia's notorious Medellin cocaine cartel may find it among the extreme rightist groups that were formerly his allies here in the sun-scorched central Magdalena Valley.
OPINION
June 9, 1991 | Cecilia Rodriguez, Cecilia Rodriguez is a Colombian journalist based in Mexico City
An elderly, popular and eccentric priest may achieve what for years has been a dream for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, its Colombian counterpart and Colombia's army and police: put behind bars the most-wanted cocaine trafficker in the world--Pablo Escobar, head of the infamous Medellin cartel. Escobar's imprisonment would appear to be the culminating victory of a 15-year war on drugs fought on an international battleground.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2009 | Tim Rutten
If you speak a little Spanish and recently have spent a bit of time anywhere near the border, you've probably heard a narcocorrido, a ballad sung to danceable Norteno-style music with lyrics that romanticize the drug trade. It's a hugely popular genre, and embattled officials in the violence-ravaged Mexican state of Baja California have gone so far as to keep the songs off the airwaves there.
NEWS
July 10, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A lawyer who recently stopped representing cocaine king Pablo Escobar because of death threats was killed by unidentified gunmen as he left his office in Medellin, police said. They said two gunmen riddled Salomon Lozano with more than 25 bullets and severely injured his brother in an ambush. Lozano, 35, is the fifth Escobar lawyer to be gunned down in the last four months. Police suspect the killings are the work of People Persecuted by Pablo Escobar, a shadowy paramilitary group.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Robert Abele, Special to the Los Angeles Times
They weren't related, but drug lord Pablo Escobar and soccer player Andres Escobar led intertwined lives of glory and infamy in Colombia, and the full-throttle documentary "The Two Escobars" dynamically chronicles their meshed fates. Using richly drawn interviews and a rhythmic punch to editing archival footage, Jeff and Michael Zimbalist ("Favela Rising") take a ravenous appetite to their biographical portraits while never losing sight of their real subject: the queasy intersection of sport and crime.
OPINION
September 20, 2010 | By Thomas E. McNamara
Washington and Mexico City are unsure whether Mexico today resembles Colombia's insurgency of 20 years ago. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton thinks it does; some Mexicans and, maybe, President Obama think not ("The wrong solution in Mexico," Opinion, Sept. 10). As the American ambassador in Colombia when the notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar was at riding high, and later when he was defeated, I side with Clinton in seeing many parallels. The parallels begin with the Colombia of the Escobar days being a large, progressive democracy with a vibrant economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2010 | By PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Few things are more prickly and complicated than the relationships between sons and fathers. Just ask Michael Douglas, who spent many troubled years trying to carve out any kind of satisfying kinship with Kirk Douglas, his emotionally distant father. Many political observers believe that part of the impetus for George W. Bush's invasion of Iraq came from a deep-seated desire to set himself apart from the kind of failures that marked his father's, George H.W. Bush, one-term presidency. But when it comes to difficult fathers, few men have endured the kind of emotional burden carried by Sebastian Marroquin, the son of the notorious Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar, whose illicit empire was so vast that he was once estimated to be worth around $25 billion, his cartel controlling the majority of the global cocaine trade.
WORLD
July 15, 2009 | Chris Kraul
The government-ordered killing of a hippopotamus that escaped from the ranch once owned by the late drug kingpin Pablo Escobar has raised an outcry among Colombian animal rights groups. The hippo, nicknamed Pepe, was killed last month near the town of Puerto Berrio, about 100 miles northwest of Bogota. An environmental agency in Antioquia state ordered the hippo killed as a health risk and menace to farmers and fishermen, and the national Environment Ministry approved the killing.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2009 | Tim Rutten
If you speak a little Spanish and recently have spent a bit of time anywhere near the border, you've probably heard a narcocorrido, a ballad sung to danceable Norteno-style music with lyrics that romanticize the drug trade. It's a hugely popular genre, and embattled officials in the violence-ravaged Mexican state of Baja California have gone so far as to keep the songs off the airwaves there.
NEWS
July 3, 2001 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The story of how U.S. Army intelligence experts and Delta Force commandos helped Colombian police track down and kill Pablo Escobar, head of the Medellin cocaine cartel, in December 1993 is rife with implications for the United States as it embarks upon a $1.3-billion effort, complete with Black Hawk helicopters and trainers, to eradicate cocaine production in this South American country over the next two years.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Argentine authorities arrested the widow and son of slain Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar shortly after a television program revealed that police were shadowing the two as part of a money-laundering investigation. Security Minister Miguel Angel Toma said the arrests of Victoria Henao Vallejos and Juan Pablo Escobar in Buenos Aires had been prodded by the program's revelation.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Richard A. Serrano and Richard Fausset
The residence where Mexican drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman apparently had been hiding is a tidy, whitewashed house with spike-topped wrought iron fencing, a heavy metal door and blackened windows. It sits across from a high school and is surrounded by drainage canals that may have been part of a system officials said Guzman used as both a means of escape and to access a network of other homes. Guzman was nothing if not discreet. "I thought the house was empty," a neighbor told The Times on Sunday.
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Argentine authorities arrested the widow and son of slain Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar shortly after a television program revealed that police were shadowing the two as part of a money-laundering investigation. Security Minister Miguel Angel Toma said the arrests of Victoria Henao Vallejos and Juan Pablo Escobar in Buenos Aires had been prodded by the program's revelation.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pablo Escobar, head of the notorious Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most wanted fugitives, was killed Thursday in a shootout with Colombian security forces. Hundreds of soldiers and police surrounded Escobar's Medellin hide-out, which they had identified through a traced phone call, and killed the drug lord and a bodyguard in a 20-minute shootout when the two tried to escape via the roof.
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