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Pablo Escobar Gavira

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NEWS
April 29, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of mourners crowded rain-drenched Bogota streets Saturday for a funeral march honoring assassinated presidential candidate Carlos Pizarro Leongomez, a guerrilla chieftain who became a champion of peace. Pizarro's leftist political movement, the Democratic Alliance M-19, announced that it will continue its campaign for May 27 presidential elections with another former guerrilla as its candidate.
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WORLD
December 20, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
HACIENDA Napoles was Pablo Escobar's pleasure palace, a 5,500-acre estate where the notorious drug lord reigned over million-dollar cocaine deals, parties with underage girls and visits by shadowy men of power. Escobar lived large here in his lush fiefdom 100 miles east of Medellin, far from the teeming slums where he began his life of crime. He built a bullring, an airstrip, an ersatz Jurassic Park with half a dozen immense concrete dinosaurs.
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NEWS
October 27, 1988 | AMY STEVENS, Times Staff Writer
Twenty-one people, including an Orange County lawyer who has defended alleged members of a Colombian drug cartel, have been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of cocaine smuggling, it was disclosed Wednesday. Eleven people have been arrested so far in the case, which involved the importation and distribution of up to 1,000 kilograms of uncut cocaine in the United States every month for at least a year, officials said.
NEWS
December 4, 1993 | From Associated Press
The burial of cocaine king Pablo Escobar, one of the world's most hunted criminals but a Robin Hood to his admirers, on Friday drew thousands of Colombians to a cemetery so packed his wife and children couldn't get through to the coffin. Crowds of curious onlookers and flower-bearing mourners sought a last glimpse of the ruthless cartel leader who had waged a decade-long war with the government while funneling drugs into the United States and Europe.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wily and nervous as a hunted fox, and maybe more than a little crazed, Pablo Escobar manages to stay a step ahead of Colombian anti-narcotics forces as they dog his trail from hide-out to hide-out. Escobar, 40, is Colombia's leading drug lord and most-wanted man.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pablo Escobar, head of the notorious Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most wanted fugitives, was killed Thursday in a shootout with Colombian security forces. Hundreds of soldiers and police surrounded Escobar's Medellin hide-out, which they had identified through a traced phone call, and killed the drug lord and a bodyguard in a 20-minute shootout when the two tried to escape via the roof.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pablo Escobar, the billionaire cocaine lord who eluded an intense police manhunt for seven years, surrendered to Colombian authorities Wednesday in exchange for a promise of leniency for drug-related crimes and a guarantee against extradition to the United States.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After years of terrorizing Colombia with bombings, kidnapings and assassinations, Pablo Escobar, the world's most notorious drug lord, has stunned his violence-weary countrymen again--this time with an offer to surrender. The announcement, 21 months into the most determined manhunt ever mounted by Colombian police, came last week from an eccentric, 82-year-old Roman Catholic priest who said he met with the billionaire cocaine dealer at a luxurious ranch hide-out and knelt with him in prayer.
NEWS
October 22, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pablo Escobar and Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha have joined the notorious ranks of Billy the Kid and Al Capone. After years on the rampage, the two Colombian drug lords seem bigger than life and as bad as bandits come. Forbes magazine estimates the pair's wealth in the billions of dollars. In addition to buying the compliance of countless Colombian officials, they are known to finance paramilitary platoons in rural areas and squads of hired killers in the cities.
WORLD
December 20, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
HACIENDA Napoles was Pablo Escobar's pleasure palace, a 5,500-acre estate where the notorious drug lord reigned over million-dollar cocaine deals, parties with underage girls and visits by shadowy men of power. Escobar lived large here in his lush fiefdom 100 miles east of Medellin, far from the teeming slums where he began his life of crime. He built a bullring, an airstrip, an ersatz Jurassic Park with half a dozen immense concrete dinosaurs.
NEWS
December 3, 1993 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pablo Escobar, head of the notorious Medellin cocaine cartel and one of the world's most wanted fugitives, was killed Thursday in a shootout with Colombian security forces. Hundreds of soldiers and police surrounded Escobar's Medellin hide-out, which they had identified through a traced phone call, and killed the drug lord and a bodyguard in a 20-minute shootout when the two tried to escape via the roof.
NEWS
December 1, 1993 | Associated Press
The wife of fugitive drug lord Pablo Escobar, threatened by a death squad and rejected in her request for asylum in Germany, is pleading for any country to grant her family a haven. "Our lives are in danger in Colombia and we don't have the ability to protect ourselves from the evil of our enemies," Victoria Escobar said in an appeal carried by local media Tuesday. Mrs.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
The government relented Monday and promised to renew protection for the family of fugitive drug lord Pablo Escobar, a day after the relatives tried and failed to find asylum abroad. The family fears a clandestine paramilitary group that has been killing Escobar's associates. They left after the government canceled their guards.
NEWS
November 13, 1993 | WILLIAM R. LONG
Police informer Ivan Custodio Barbosa de Lima, spilling the beans on bad cops in Rio, has told judicial authorities that police extorted $10 million from Pablo Escobar, the notorious king of cocaine who escaped from jail in neighboring Colombia in July, 1992. Lima said he did not participate in the crime but learned of it from former police who did.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | Times Wire Services
Fugitive drug lord Pablo Escobar has smuggled his family out of Colombia, possibly to Europe, to protect them from vengeful enemies, security sources said Friday. The police sources said Escobar's wife, Maria Victoria Henao, his two children, Juan Pablo and Manuela, and his mother, Hermilda Gaviria, appeared to have slipped across the border to Venezuela at the end of April carrying false papers.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | Associated Press
Pablo Escobar, the fugitive leader of the Medellin drug cartel, said in a letter that he would surrender to authorities if the government guaranteed his security. The letter was slipped under the door of RCN radio network offices in Medellin. It was 2 1/2 pages, handwritten, signed by Escobar and stamped with his fingerprint. "I'm willing to present myself if I'm given certain written and public guarantees," said the letter to Atty. Gen. Gustavo de Greiff.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
In a major escalation of the already bloody war between the Colombian government and narcotics traffickers, presumed drug barons attacked one of the nation's most important newspapers, setting off a powerful truck bomb that killed at least one person and wounded at least 83 more. The 6:40 a.m.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their single biggest victory in the drug war, Colombian police Friday shot and killed notorious narcotics trafficker Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, who as a leader of the Medellin cartel waged a campaign of terror to maintain the world's biggest cocaine empire.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | STEVEN AMBRUS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A powerful car bomb exploded in an upscale shopping district of Bogota on Thursday, killing at least 11 people, injuring 100 and demolishing buildings and vehicles along a block-long stretch, officials said. No one claimed responsibility for the bombing, but Colombian President Cesar Gaviria, citing intelligence reports, blamed fugitive drug lord Pablo Escobar.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His private army shattered and his family threatened, fugitive cocaine king Pablo Escobar is coming under unprecedented pressure to surrender to authorities and put an end to the deadly war he is waging against the Colombian government. A month after a car bomb blamed on Escobar killed 20 people in downtown Bogota, nearly all of the drug lord's most trusted henchmen have been slain or captured or have surrendered.
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