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November 25, 2006 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Amid the fallout and finger-pointing surrounding O.J. Simpson's hypothetical confession "If I Did It," there's one man who knows everything but has said nothing -- ghostwriter and longtime L.A.-based screenwriter Pablo Fenjves. He was Nicole Brown Simpson's neighbor and a witness at the 1995 murder trial, the man who famously testified that he heard a dog's "plaintive wail" the night of her murder, a key plot point in the prosecution's case.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2006 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
Amid the fallout and finger-pointing surrounding O.J. Simpson's hypothetical confession "If I Did It," there's one man who knows everything but has said nothing -- ghostwriter and longtime L.A.-based screenwriter Pablo Fenjves. He was Nicole Brown Simpson's neighbor and a witness at the 1995 murder trial, the man who famously testified that he heard a dog's "plaintive wail" the night of her murder, a key plot point in the prosecution's case.
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NEWS
October 11, 1995 | GREG KRIKORIAN
Even now, after so many months of testimony, much of it riveting, some of it jarring, his simple, haunting phrase remains among the most memorable of the case. It was June 30, 1994, when Pablo Fenjves first took the witness stand during the preliminary hearing and was asked by Marcia Clark where he was the night Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman were murdered. He was at his home in Brentwood, Fenjves said, watching the news.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | GREG KRIKORIAN
Even now, after so many months of testimony, much of it riveting, some of it jarring, his simple, haunting phrase remains among the most memorable of the case. It was June 30, 1994, when Pablo Fenjves first took the witness stand during the preliminary hearing and was asked by Marcia Clark where he was the night Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman were murdered. He was at his home in Brentwood, Fenjves said, watching the news.
NEWS
July 2, 1994
Six witnesses took the stand in the O.J. Simpson preliminary hearing Friday, bringing to 10 the number of people who have testified. Friday's witnesses: 1: KAREN LEE CRAWFORD, manager and bartender at Mezzaluna restaurant. Said she found the glasses left by Nicole Simpson's mother and gave them to Ronald Goldman. 2: STEWART TANNER, waiter and bartender at Mezzaluna. Said he was planning to meet Goldman after work on the evening of the killings. Goldman never showed up.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1995 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Set against today's heightened sense of racial divide, the irony in tonight's HBO movie, "The Affair," a World War II-era drama about a tragic interracial liaison, is inescapable. In this "inspired by true events" saga, a black G.I. stationed in a small British town suffers injustice and betrayal, paying the ultimate price for his love affair with an unhappily married white woman.
NEWS
July 9, 1994
A look at the time frames provided during court testimony in the O.J. Simpson case. Many of the witnesses said the times are approximate: 9 p.m.: Ron Goldman's co-workers at Mezzaluna restaurant: 9:50 p.m.: Goldman leaves carrying glasses for Nicole Simpson. Guest house tenant Brian (Kato) Kaelin: 9:45 p.m.: Returns to estate with Simpson after going out together for fast food. * 10 p.m.: Nicole Simpson's neighbors: Pablo Fenjves, 10:15 to 10:20 p.m.: Hears dog wailing. Steven Schwab, 10:55 p.m.
NEWS
February 8, 1995
UCLA law professor Peter Arenella and Loyola University law professor Laurie Levenson offer their take on the Simpson trial. Joining them is Los Angeles defense lawyer Albert De Blanc Jr., who will rotate with other experts as the case moves forward. Today's topic: The prosecution tries to establish the time of the killings. PETER ARENELLA On the prosecution: "Time is critical. Prosecutors must prove that the murders occurred close to 10:15 to show that O.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- It was derided as a cheap publishing stunt, a book that major publishers wouldn't touch and booksellers vowed to ignore. But four weeks after its release, "If I Did It: Confessions of the Killer," a book penned by O.J. Simpson and co-writer Pablo Fenjves, is a fixture on bestseller lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
The notorious ghost-written O.J. Simpson book, "If I Did It," left for dead after it sparked the closing of Judith Regan's publishing imprint and a PR disaster for parent company HarperCollins, seemed to have a shot at a second life earlier this week when the family of the slain Ronald Lyle Goldman purchased the book from a court-appointed bankruptcy trust. They then announced their intention of publishing it under the title "Confessions of a Double Murderer."
BUSINESS
November 22, 2006 | Gina Piccalo and Meg James, Times Staff Writers
Scant details have emerged about the genesis of O.J. Simpson's book "If I Did It" and how the TV project landed at News Corp.'s Fox television network. But two things became clear Tuesday, a day after News Corp. pulled the plug on both the book and a two-part TV special on Fox: The project was a source of heated internal debate at Fox and the book may never find a publisher.
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