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Pablo Marz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be dead to see actor Pablo Marz's one-man show, but it does help you get a good seat. Twice a year, Marz, 41, portrays the artist Michelangelo before crowds packed into the main room of the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial-Park in Glendale. He has already heard all the jokes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1994 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You don't have to be dead to see actor Pablo Marz's one-man show, but it does help you get a good seat. Twice a year, Marz, 41, portrays the artist Michelangelo before crowds packed into the main room of the Great Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Memorial-Park in Glendale. He has already heard all the jokes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
"The Immigrant Project" isn't smooth or flashy, but it does offer some useful insights into culture and ethnicity. Words Across Cultures, an ensemble operating out of Deaf West Theatre, has stitched together this modest show from six poems and seven playlets describing the immigrant experience in America. The characters' backgrounds range from Central American to Latvian, South African to Chinese.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1993 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Coast Ensemble is alternating performances of "Bitter Cane" and "La Malasangre" ("Bad Blood"), two plays by contemporary women, set in the 19th Century. Both are ostensibly about doomed love affairs, but both apparently have deeper themes too. The subtext isn't all that subterranean in "La Malasangre," by Argentine playwright Griselda Gambaro, especially if you consider that Gambaro was forced into exile from her country from 1977 to 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1987 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
What kid wouldn't rather go to the the circus than clean up a messy room? In the Los Angeles Children's Museum's colorful "Spinning the Big Top," a girl named Hero is told to tidy her room. But unmade beds and a toy-strewn floor aren't nearly as interesting as dreaming up ferocious beasties, tightrope walkers and clowns. Imagination abounds in this new Bumberchute production conceived by Bennett McClellan and directed by Candace Barrett.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1986 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Bravo to the Los Angeles Children's Museum and its new children's theater ensemble, Bumberchute. Last summer, a pleasingly literate production of Rudyard Kipling's "Just So" stories suggested that the fledgling acting troupe--all museum staff--would be worth a second look. Its current production, "Toad of Toad Hall," proves it. Under Candace Barrett Birk's direction, care is taken to treat classic literature for children with respect. Using A. A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1988 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
The homegrown Bumberchute Players of the Los Angeles Children's Museum are putting on a show for holiday visitors guaranteed to bring a little light into their lives. The show, "Night light," is about a child's fear of the dark. It's all a bit patchy, as if it needs more time to come together, but the cast delivers with such good cheer that much is forgiven.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1985 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
"Is she going to be all right?" Pablo Marz, house manager of Louis B. Mayer Performance Space at the Los Angeles Children's Museum, paused apprehensively to address the mother of a loudly tearful infant, in the middle of his brief pre-performance cautionary speech that admonished: No sudden onstage audience ambulations, and quiet, please. "I think she'll be fine once she's entertained," was the serene reply.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1987 | JULIE WHEELOCK
When the Exotic Women take to the stage in their Fringe Festival production of "To Hell in a Handbag," (Sept. 17 at the Limbo Lounge of the Four Star Saloon in West Hollywood) their sets will be constructed of discarded lumber, their thrift shop costumes home tailored and their props will include a working TV set rescued from a garbage dumpster. "It's amazing what people will throw away," says Malcolm Brooker, company member. "We gather things from anywhere we can find them."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Some plays look like TV. Others imitate the movies. "Slow Love," at the Harman Avenue Theater, resembles nothing so much as that landmark French film, "Last Year at Marienbad." Australian playwright Richard Murphet acknowledges his debt to Alain Robbe-Grillet, who wrote "Last Year." Both writers broke up their narratives into tiny pieces and mixed up the chronology.
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