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October 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pabst to Shutter Milwaukee Brewery: Pabst Brewing Co. said it will close the plant and lay off 250 workers, ending 150 years of Blue Ribbon beer in the city that once dominated the industry. Pabst, which will continue to be brewed elsewhere, already had shifted about two-thirds of its production to Stroh Brewing Co.'s La Crosse, Wis., plant. The decision to cease operations by year-end was prompted by reduced demand and first-quarter losses that were significantly greater than anticipated.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pabst to Shutter Milwaukee Brewery: Pabst Brewing Co. said it will close the plant and lay off 250 workers, ending 150 years of Blue Ribbon beer in the city that once dominated the industry. Pabst, which will continue to be brewed elsewhere, already had shifted about two-thirds of its production to Stroh Brewing Co.'s La Crosse, Wis., plant. The decision to cease operations by year-end was prompted by reduced demand and first-quarter losses that were significantly greater than anticipated.
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BUSINESS
October 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pabst Tells Union of Payroll Cut: The Milwaukee beer maker has notified the Brewery Workers union that two-thirds of the approximately 400 employees at its plant there will be laid off by December under a plan to shift production elsewhere. Pabst Brewing Co. had said earlier this year that it would hire G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis., to produce some of its beer if it could not cut production costs through employee concessions.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pabst Tells Union of Payroll Cut: The Milwaukee beer maker has notified the Brewery Workers union that two-thirds of the approximately 400 employees at its plant there will be laid off by December under a plan to shift production elsewhere. Pabst Brewing Co. had said earlier this year that it would hire G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis., to produce some of its beer if it could not cut production costs through employee concessions.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1985
As expected, William F. Smith Jr., president and chief executive of Milwaukee-based Pabst Brewing Co., resigned both posts in the wake of the company's takeover by California investor Paul Kalmanovitz. Executive Vice President John C. Brzezinski also resigned.
BUSINESS
February 9, 1985
Milwaukee-based Pabst Brewing Co. said its board would support an offer of $10 a share, or about $64 million, for the company's stock by S&P Co., headed by California brewer Paul Kalmanovitz. Because of a dispute in court between Pabst and two other brewers, however, the company had to officially take a neutral position on the Kalmanovitz offer, a spokesman said. A court hearing is scheduled in Detroit in late March on whether to permanently bar G. Heileman Brewing Co. of La Crosse, Wis.
NEWS
August 23, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Harris Perlstein, former president and chairman of Pabst Brewing Co. under whose auspices a single beer maker first sold its products on both the East and West coasts, has died at the age of 93. Perlstein died of heart failure on Sunday. He was a member of the board of directors at Pabst for 47 years, from 1932 to 1979. He also served as chairman from 1954 to 1972, president from 1932 to 1956 and chairman of the executive committee from 1972 to 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lorraine Dunn Davis, 61, a Washington, D.C., accountant who in her youth represented Panama in 1960 and 1964 Olympic sprinting events, died Oct. 16 at North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie, Md. The cause was a heart attack. Born in Panama, where her father was an accountant for the Panama Canal, Davis came from a family of athletes but pursued competitive running only when a friend said she could travel abroad if she were a member of the Panamanian national women's track team.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu and Ricardo Lopez
The dismantling of Hostess Brands Inc. continued this week as bidders, including the owner of Pabst Brewing Co., emerged to buy the bankrupt company's bread and cake brands. C. Dean Metropoulos & Co., the private equity firm that owns the popular Pabst beer label, is one of the likely stalking horse bidders for Hostess cake brands such as Twinkies, Ho Hos, Ding Dongs and CupCakes, according to a person close to the deal. Metropoulos would be joined by Apollo Global Management, a private equity firm that owns major companies such as Carl's Jr. parent CKE, the source said.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Just like its popular Duncan Hines cake mixes, packaged foods company Pinnacle Foods Inc. was on the rise Thursday morning after raising $580 million in an initial public offering. The company -- which owns an array of popular brands including Birds Eye, Aunt Jemima, Log Cabin, Mrs. Butterworth's and Hungry-Man -- debuted on the New York Stock Exchange under the PF symbol. Wednesday night, the Parsippany, N.J.-based business sold 29 million shares for $20 apiece -- on the top end of its suggested $18-to-$20 range.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Paul Kalmanovitz, a reclusive immigrant who became one of the wealthiest men in the United States through several brewing companies he owned, died of cancer at his home in Tiburon, Calif., over the weekend. Kalmanovitz, who once wanted to spend $15 million to erect a Statue of Justice in San Francisco Bay to rival the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, was 81. At his death he owned Pabst Brewing Co., Falstaff Brewing, General Brewing, Lucky Lager Brewery and a brewery in Zhaoqing, China.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1985 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
In a surprise move, California brewer Paul Kalmanovitz on Monday renewed his tender offer of $10 a share for all 6.36 million outstanding shares of ailing Pabst Brewing Co.'s stock. The Kalmanovitz offer, launched by his Vancouver, Wash.-based S&P Co., was made one month after Pabst agreed to be acquired by La Crosse, Wis.-based G. Heileman Brewing Co. for $11 a share, or about $70 million.
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