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NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Scientists have struggled to explain a recent slowdown in the rise of global surface temperatures while skeptics have seized on the 15-year lull to cast doubt on the science of climate change. A new study offers one explanation of where much of the heat trapped by greenhouse gas emissions is going: the ocean. Scientists found that parts of the Pacific Ocean are absorbing heat faster than they have over the past 10,000 years. The results, published Friday in the journal Science, suggest seawater is capturing far more energy than previously thought, for now sparing land-dwellers some of the worst effects of climate change.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
El Niño, nature's most powerful influence on weather around the globe, has been in a lull for two years. But indications suggest that could change as early as fall. Since spring 2012, the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean has not warmed enough to create an El Niño. Nor has it cooled to form a La Niña. Instead, it has lingered in an in-between state some experts call "La Nada. " Though it is too early to predict with much certainty, scientists say their observations and computer models show increasing signs of El Niño's return, which might portend more rain for California.
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NATIONAL
February 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Climate experts meeting in Atlanta confirmed the start of La Nina -- a cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean that often coincides with stronger hurricanes, a wetter Pacific Northwest and a drier South. The event will probably last through late spring and possibly through the summer, said Edward Alan O'Lenic, chief of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
California is bracing for what officials fear could be an unprecedented winter fire season fueled by record dry conditions that show no signs of letting up. January is typically a time when forest fire camps and air bases are closed and seasonal firefighters go home. But not this year. the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has responded to 150 wildfires so far. During the same period last January, there were none, and the historic average is 25. Fire officials pointed to coastal fires in Humboldt and San Mateo counties in the last two weeks as examples of the conditions they're facing.
NEWS
January 17, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
British millionaire-adventurer Richard Branson and Swedish pilot Per Lindstrand crossed the North American coast early today to set a distance record for a manned balloon in a trans-Pacific odyssey from Japan. Organizers of the trek said the pair crossed the coastline at 1:45 a.m. PST, headed for a landing in the Canadian Yukon sometime after dawn. They expected to set down somewhere between Great Bear Lake and Great Slave Lake near Yellowknife in Canada's Northwest Territories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A magnitude 4.6 earthquake centered in the Pacific Ocean rattled the Ventura County coast Saturday. The temblor occurred at 1:33 p.m., centered about 23 miles northwest of Santa Barbara Island and 44 miles south of Ventura, according to a preliminary report from the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. There were no immediate reports of damage or injuries.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | United Press International
A 23-year-old yachtswoman completed a solo round trip across the Pacific Ocean on Saturday, reportedly the first woman to accomplish the feat that covered nearly 14,000 miles. Kyoko Imakiire, a former Kagoshima municipal office employee, was welcomed by 1,000 relatives and friends as she sailed her 4-ton yacht Kairentarachine into Kagoshima Port. "I wanted to be with my family on New Year's Day," Imakiire told reporters. "I was jubilant when my yacht drew close to the port."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000
Russia will use an unmanned cargo spacecraft to safely drop the aging Mir into the Pacific in February, a top space official said Wednesday, seeking to allay fears that the space station will make an uncontrolled plunge that could rain tons of flaming debris on populated areas. Russian Aerospace Agency chief Yuri Koptev said that a 20-hour loss of radio contact with Mir this week was a final warning that its time is up.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two jumbo jets, one from Los Angeles, came within seconds of colliding head-on 28,665 feet over the Pacific Ocean after an air traffic controller mistakenly put them on a collision course, Japanese aviation officials said. Northwest Airlines Flight 6 from Tokyo to Chicago avoided the disaster Sunday by veering out of the way of oncoming Cathay Pacific Airways Flight 881 from Los Angeles en route to Hong Kong, the officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1985 | GLENN BURKINS, Times Staff Writer
Restocking lakes and streams with fish bred at hatcheries is a time-tested practice with a proven record of success. But a group of marine biologists from local institutions are embarking on uncharted waters, as they attempt to restock Pacific Ocean coastal waters with two species of fish whose numbers have declined drastically in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
This year is shaping up to be the driest in downtown Los Angeles since 1877. Only 3.60 inches have fallen at the  National Weather Service  station at USC since Jan. 1, about half an inch less than was recorded in 1953 and 1947, which until now had tied for the lowest rainfall. Climatologist Bill Patzert of  NASA's   Jet Propulsion Laboratory  in La Cañada Flintridge blames a long-lasting weather pattern in the Pacific Ocean called the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.
NEWS
December 11, 2013 | By Leon Logothetis
As of this writing, I have been on the road for 100 days, going around the world on a motorcycle trip that's been supported by other people's kindness.  I started in August at the famed Hollywood sign and have crossed three continents and, by journey's end, two huge bodies of water. This is the final day of the Asian leg of my journey as I head off across the Pacific Ocean on a container ship. Before I left on this epic journey I had called all the container lines of the world and asked for a free ride across the oceans so that my bright-yellow motorcycle, which I've dubbed Kindness One , and I could circumnavigate the globe.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has been doing some serious myth-busting after news reports this week claimed a massive island of debris from the 2011 Japan tsunami was headed for the U.S. West Coast. One problem: There is no floating mass of debris. The disaster swept millions of tons of material out to sea. While some has washed up on the West Coast and Hawaii, what remains afloat is widely scattered across the Pacific. The source of alarm was a map NOAA posted online without fanfare Sept.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Scientists have struggled to explain a recent slowdown in the rise of global surface temperatures while skeptics have seized on the 15-year lull to cast doubt on the science of climate change. A new study offers one explanation of where much of the heat trapped by greenhouse gas emissions is going: the ocean. Scientists found that parts of the Pacific Ocean are absorbing heat faster than they have over the past 10,000 years. The results, published Friday in the journal Science, suggest seawater is capturing far more energy than previously thought, for now sparing land-dwellers some of the worst effects of climate change.
SCIENCE
September 22, 2013 | By Monte Morin
It's a climate puzzle that has vexed scientists for more than a decade and added fuel to the arguments of those who insist man-made global warming is a myth. Since just before the start of the 21st century, the Earth's average global surface temperature has failed to rise despite soaring levels of heat-trapping greenhouse gases and years of dire warnings from environmental advocates. Now, as scientists with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gather in Sweden this week to approve portions of the IPCC's fifth assessment report, they are finding themselves pressured to explain this glaring discrepancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
In "The World Without Us," Alan Weisman took readers for a romp through the misty primeval forest in Poland and splashed into gin-clear waters to gaze upon one the most remote and intact coral reefs in the Pacific Ocean. Besides highlighting a few of the world's last remaining pristine places, the bestseller engaged in a thought experiment: If human beings were suddenly wiped off the face of Earth, how fast would nature overgrow cities with vegetation, reclaim the land, and demonstrate its remarkable resilience?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
No one doubts that the 20th century is ending hotter than it began. The 10 warmest years of the past century have occurred in the last 15 years, records show. Spring arrives a week earlier than 20 years ago, scientists say. Extremes of weather have become increasingly common, and even the butterflies appear to be fleeing northward to escape the heat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987 | GEORGE JAHN, Associated Press
The head of Japan's prestigious Science Council says his country is looking for someone to build a city standing on pillars in the Pacific Ocean for homes for up to a million people. There have been no firm offers yet, although there have been some expressions of interest, said Jiro Kondo, president of the council, which has completed a feasibility study of the project and hopes someone will build it in exchange for real estate rights.
SCIENCE
September 9, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
A UC San Diego chemistry center has won $20 million from the National Science Foundation to continue pioneering research on the effects of tiny atmospheric particles on climate. The award, announced Monday, follows a much smaller NSF grant that helped establish the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment at the university three years ago. Distributed over five years, the funding will underwrite research by a multidisciplinary team of scientists from various institutions who are examining the role that microscopic atmospheric particles called aerosols play in precipitation and other aspects of climate.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A seamount in the northwestern Pacific Ocean may be the largest volcano on Earth, and could rival the largest in the solar system -- the mighty Olympus Mons on Mars -- according to oceanographers. Tamu Massif, a well-known seamount off Japan, turns out to be one continuous shield volcano, about the size of New Mexico or the British Isles, said geophysicist William W. Sager, lead author of a study published online Thursday in the journal Nature Geoscience. Sager and team members had long ago given names to the formations jutting up from the Shatsky Rise, a California-sized oceanic plateau southeast of Japan.
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