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Pacific Telesis

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BUSINESS
November 1, 1985
The parent of Pacific Bell said the unregulated venture, called PacTel Spectrum Services, will manage and monitor private voice-data networks for clients using a new remote testing device and proprietary software that feeds operating data into two service centers. The "network assurance service" eliminates clients' needs to track problems and pin down responsibility for repairs among the multiple vendors typically involved.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1999
Re "Phone Co.'s Wrong Number," editorial, April 13: In the two years since Pacific Telesis merged with SBC Communications Inc., Pacific Bell has created more than 4,000 new jobs, most of them in customer-facing positions, which has spurred residential installation and repair service gains. With more than 18 million access lines, delays can occur. But even as installation orders increased 37% in 1998, Pacific Bell met 98.7% of its installation commitments. Installation intervals statewide have decreased from 3.29 days to 1.97 days.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 1986
California's regional telephone company used money from local customers to subsidize new business ventures, according to audits requested by the National Assn. of Regulatory Utility Commissioners. The California Public Utilities Commission staff has recommended that ratepayers be reimbursed $17 million in the case. Pacific Telesis "strongly disagrees" with the findings, a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1997 | Bloomberg News
SBC Communications Inc. said Vice Chairman Philip Quigley will retire at the end of the year, nine months after completing the sale of Pacific Telesis Group to SBC. Quigley, 55, chairman, president and chief executive of San Francisco-based PacTel, negotiated the sale of the Baby Bell local phone company to its sibling SBC for $16.5 billion. The transaction, completed in April, formed the largest U.S.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1987
San Francisco-based Pacific Telesis Group, which serves California and Nevada, said Thursday that its first-quarter profit rose 7% from a year earlier on a slight increase in revenue. Pacific Telesis said the results do not reflect a recent ruling by the California Public Utilities Commission to reduce the rates of Pacific Bell, a Pacific Telesis unit, in 1987 to account for lower inflation and interest rates.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1992 | Associated Press
John E. Hulse has resigned as chief financial officer of Pacific Telesis Group, ending his 34-year career in the telecommunications industry, Chief Executive Sam Ginn announced Monday. Hulse will be succeeded by Lydell L. Christensen, who was also named executive vice president. Christensen, 57, will retain the post of treasurer, which he has held since 1987.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Pacific Telesis Group, calling 1988 a "banner year," today reported a 25% increase in earnings over 1987. Earnings for the 12 months that ended Dec. 31 were $1.19 billion, compared to $950 million for the previous year, the telecommunications corporation said. Per-share earnings for the year were up 27.1% to $2.81, compared to $2.21 in 1987. Outstanding shares decreased from 430 million to 423 million.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Michael Ashby, vice president and chief financial officer of Pacific Telesis Enterprises, has been named to the board of directors for Xircom in Thousand Oaks. "Michael's leadership role at Pacific Telesis, combined with his years of experience in finance and operations at other technology companies, will be very valuable to Xircom," said Dirk Gates, Xircom chairman, president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1987
More members of Pacific Telesis' top management announced on Tuesday their intent to take early retirement, thus following the lead last July of the the holding company's chief executive, Donald E. Guinn, 54, and his counterpart at Pacific Bell, Theodore J. Saenger, 59. Tuesday's batch include vice president Gerald D. Foster, 57, head of Southern California operations for the San Francisco-based parent firm.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1985 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
Pacific Telesis Group, which inherited Pacific Telephone's local network and other assets 16 months ago, threw its first annual meeting Friday--just two days after its former parent, AT&T, held its 100th. The theme was the new company's future, not the old Bell past, Chairman Donald E. Guinn emphasized, telling reporters: "Then's then; now's now."
BUSINESS
May 10, 1997 | Reuters
SBC Communications Inc., in its first report as a merged company after acquiring Pacific Telesis Group, reported higher first-quarter earnings. SBC said its earnings rose to $857 million, or 94 cents a share, on a pro forma basis that reflects the April 1 merger with Pacific Telesis, compared with earnings of $798 million, or 86 cents, in the year-ago quarter. San Antonio-based SBC Communications is the holding company for Southwestern Bell, Pacific Bell, Nevada Bell and Cellular One.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 2.3 million California households are dialing into the Internet, and those connections account for 27% of all residential phone use in California, according to a study released Tuesday by Pacific Telesis Group in support of its request to charge fees for access to the global computer network.
NEWS
March 23, 1997 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Pacific Telesis Group acknowledge that they were unaware former Associate Atty. Gen. Webster L. Hubbell, one of the firm's private advisors in the high-stakes battle over massive telecommunications legislation in 1994, worked at the same time for a competing telephone company. Hubbell's simultaneous consulting deals with Pacific Telesis, which provides local phone service in California and Nevada, and Sprint Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996
Letters (Dec. 6) about the pending 818 area code split show there is confusion about Pacific Bell's role in the administration of telephone numbers in California. Evaluating relief options for rapidly exhausting area codes is a process that involves the entire telecommunications industry--not Pacific Bell exclusively. As many as 25 local and long distance carriers, and cellular, paging and cable television providers meet at the planning table. In selecting a final area code relief plan, each company has one vote.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN
Consumer advocates see big bucks in the proposed merger of Baby Bells Pacific Telesis and SBC Communications. The watchdog group Toward Utility Rate Normalization has asked the state Public Utilities Commission to order $1 billion worth of refunds for Pacific Bell's California customers if the merger is approved early next year. The PUC's own Division of Ratepayer Advocates has gone even further, requesting that $2.1 billion in rebates be paid out over five years.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | BARBARA MURPHY
Michael Ashby, vice president and chief financial officer of Pacific Telesis Enterprises, has been named to the board of directors for Xircom in Thousand Oaks. "Michael's leadership role at Pacific Telesis, combined with his years of experience in finance and operations at other technology companies, will be very valuable to Xircom," said Dirk Gates, Xircom chairman, president and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1986
Pacific Telesis International and Kaiser Engineers & Constructors Inc. agreed to work on joint design, construction, consulting and other services abroad. The two firms' first collaboration is with China's Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications to study the feasibility of modernizing a telephone equipment plant in Sichuan Province. The six-month project is being funded by the U.S. International Development Cooperation Agency.
NEWS
July 29, 1996 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1984, around the time of the Los Angeles Olympics, a group of Pacific Telesis executives met around a conference table in recognition that they had a tiger by the tail. The tiger was cellular telephone service, which the California phone company had introduced to coincide with the widely promoted games. And it was roaring far louder than anyone had anticipated.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Companies Protest SBC-Pac Tel Merger Plans: Documents filed by MCI Communications Corp. and AT&T Corp. with California regulators assert that the $24-billion merger between SBC Communications Inc. and Pacific Telesis Group will be anti-competitive and not in Californians' best interests. An attorney for MCI said SBC has a reputation for not welcoming competition; an AT&T spokeswoman accused SBC of anti-competitive practices.
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