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Pacific Texas Pipeline Co

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1989
A long-delayed plan to build a 1,030-mile oil pipeline from the Los Angeles Harbor to Texas has hit yet another bureaucratic snag with the revocation by the federal government of a crucial permit. Complaining that the San Pedro-based Pacific Texas Pipeline Co. had failed to pay nearly $100,000 in fees, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management rescinded its 1986 decision to let the company run the pipe under federal land in four states.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1989
A long-delayed plan to build a 1,030-mile oil pipeline from the Los Angeles Harbor to Texas has hit yet another bureaucratic snag with the revocation by the federal government of a crucial permit. Complaining that the San Pedro-based Pacific Texas Pipeline Co. had failed to pay nearly $100,000 in fees, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management rescinded its 1986 decision to let the company run the pipe under federal land in four states.
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NEWS
May 12, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
Pacific Texas Pipeline Co., which seeks to build a 1,000-mile pipeline to carry crude oil from Los Angeles Harbor to Texas, won a crucial battle Wednesday when the California Coastal Commission voted to extend the company's permit for one year. The extension was approved over the objections of several critics, who argued, among other things, that the pipeline is not financially feasible. The firm, known as Pac-Tex, needed the extension because it has failed to begin construction on the $1.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | SHERYL STOLBERG, Times Staff Writer
Pacific Texas Pipeline Co., which seeks to build a 1,000-mile pipeline to carry crude oil from Los Angeles Harbor to Texas, won a crucial battle Wednesday when the California Coastal Commission voted to extend the company's permit for one year. The extension was approved over the objections of several critics, who argued, among other things, that the pipeline is not financially feasible. The firm, known as Pac-Tex, needed the extension because it has failed to begin construction on the $1.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1985
Fred Massey was named vice president and chief financial officer for Pacific Texas Pipeline Co., Long Beach.
NEWS
March 14, 1986
Construction of an island at the Port of Los Angeles for a giant oil storage facility could begin within two to three months, according to Long Beach-based Pacific Texas Pipeline Co. President Cecil Owens made the prediction after the state Coastal Commission approved the construction of a 106-acre landfill island in the port's outer harbor where the terminal will be located.
NEWS
November 16, 1986
In a move that virtually assures funding for a multimillion-dollar restoration project at Batiquitos Lagoon in Carlsbad, the state Coastal Commission gave the go-ahead for construction of a pipeline from Los Angeles to Texas. Long Beach-based Pacific Texas Pipeline Co. will be allowed to proceed with the $1.66-billion oil pipeline project on the condition that it pay for enhancement of the lagoon to offset environmental damage the pipeline is expected to cause in Los Angeles Harbor.
NEWS
May 24, 1987
A public presentation of a proposal to restore a lagoon in exchange for the environmental damage a pipeline company expects to cause in San Pedro Bay is scheduled May 28 in the city of Carlsbad. CH2M Hill, consultants for Carlsbad, will discuss the preliminary engineering design and related studies for the Batiquitos Lagoon Enhancement Project at 7 p.m. in the Carlsbad City Council Chambers, 1200 Elm Ave. Pacific Texas Pipeline Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1985
People interested in Batiquitos Lagoon--both those who want to preserve it and those who want to develop around it--may have come into some unexpected good luck last week when the Port of Los Angeles and the Pacific Texas Pipeline Co. offered to spend $10 million restoring the lagoon. The unusual proposal comes about as part of a federal requirement that the port and pipeline company compensate for destroying environmentally important tidal land with their future projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1985
An offer by the Port of Los Angeles to foot the bill for a $15-million face lift of Batiquitos Lagoon in northern San Diego County was jeopardized Tuesday when two developers owning large portions of that coastal wetland called the state-endorsed improvement plan "totally unacceptable." The port and Pacific Texas Pipeline Co.
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