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August 5, 2011 | By Greg Kot
Lollapalooza is feeling the weight of its 90,000 capacity crowd Friday just before headliners Muse and Coldplay arrive. The South Side of the park is packed, with a Times Square vibe spilling over from the Perry's stage, which once again is the hit of the festival. With Skrillex commanding a huge crowd, the sound and lights awhirl and a crowd collectively dancing itself into a sweaty frenzy - including a dozen partyers who climbed a generator outside the tent, the better to gyrate in full view of Grant Park - it seems inevitable that Lollapalooza will eventually go 50-50 on electronic/DJ performers vs. rock bands.
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BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - After nearly four decades as a Washington lawyer and lobbyist for the cable and cellphone industries, Tom Wheeler was eager to revive long-stalled initiatives as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. But within weeks of taking charge in November, he ran into unexpected turbulence in pushing for a review of the ban on using cellphones on airplanes. Consumers howled that airline cabins would fill with annoying chatter. Opponents petitioned the White House to tell regulators that cellphone use should stay grounded.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2010
"Sunset Blvd. " wasn't the only unforgettable dark satire about show business that came out in 1950. "All About Eve," a brilliant evocation of the backbiting world of actors, writers and producers, actually dominated the Academy Awards that year. Nominated for 14 Oscars, "All About Eve" earned six, including best picture, director and screenplay for Joseph L. Mankiewicz and supporting actor for George Sanders as the acerbic critic Addison DeWitt. The film was a great comeback vehicle for Bette Davis, stealing the show as the aging theater star Margo Channing who befriends aspiring actress Eve Harrington ( Anne Baxter)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Take off your thinking cap and simply enjoy the mini-pleasures of "Antboy. " This fantastical story of 12-year-old Pelle (Oscar Dietz), who goes from zero to superhero after being bitten by a genetically modified ant, should delight kids and adults alike. The film - a Danish import that has been wisely, if not quite seamlessly, dubbed into English to accommodate younger viewers - starts with the unpopular Pelle considering himself more "invisible man" than nerd. (That latter distinction is saved for bespectacled comic-book fan Wilhelm, played by Samuel Ting Graf.)
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
U.S. District Judge Richard Leon has blocked the federal government's plan to require cigarette manufacturers to cover half of each package sold with a graphic health warning. In his ruling, issued late Wednesday, Leon said the government mandate amounted to an "impermissible expropriation of a company's advertising space for government advocacy. " That decision confirms a temporary stay issued by Leon in November - a move that signaled his view that a suit brought last August by several tobacco manufacturers against the Department of Health and Human Services would likely prevail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
A portrait of Brazilian mixed martial arts fighter Anderson "The Spider" Silva, the documentary"Like Water"feels wildly incomplete, a let-down for fans and initiates to the sport alike. The film's title comes from a quote from the late martial arts master Bruce Lee, in which he explains how water takes on the properties of the container that holds it. Perhaps meant to explain Silva's mercurial nature, the brief glimpse of Lee only highlights how uncharismatic Silva is in comparison.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Contraband," starring the rock-steady Mark Wahlberg, is about a high-risk, high-seas heist involving a supertanker that is so super complicated (implausible?) that in the wrong hands it would be laughable. Instead, this very gritty bit of greased action does a decent job of shaking the sluggish out of January. Based on the 2008 Icelandic thriller, "Reykjavik-Rotterdam," the filmmakers have turned up the heat — both literally and figuratively — shifting it from icy Nordic seas and alcohol trafficking, to set things in New Orleans with a Panama port of call and a few million counterfeit dollars on the horizon.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1996
You must think there is a major breakthrough, or smoking gun, when you put an article at the top of the Business section ("BAT Exec Urged Firm to Admit Smoking-Disease Link," Oct. 8) about the discovery of a 1980 internal letter of the British American Tobacco Co. admitting there might be a link between tobacco and disease. So what's new? I invite you to look at any one of the millions of packs of cigarettes sold every day that display the warning that cigarettes might be hazardous to your health.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1987 | CONNIE JOHNSON
There's nothing like a tell-all book and the public's willingness to cheer on the underdog to put a rock icon solidly back on the comeback trail. It worked for Tina Turner, and judging by the enthusiastic response Mary Wilson drew from a full house at the Roxy on Tuesday, it's working for the former Supreme. Wilson's career probably should have collapsed the day Diana Ross left the Supremes, since Wilson's role within that popular '60s group was minimal by comparison.
NEWS
August 8, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Think that turkey sandwich you packed for your kid's lunch will be at a safe temperature -- safe and sound from food-borne illness --when they sit down to eat it? Maybe not--a study finds that few sack lunches might be kept at proper temperatures until lunch time. The study, released Monday in the journal Pediatrics , looked at temperatures of 705 lunches containing at least one perishable item belonging to 3- to 5-year-olds. Food was removed from containers and temperatures were measured by a temperature gun about an hour and a half before the lunches were served.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Born in Berlin in 1938, Ursula Schulz-Dornburg is a contemporary of Bernd and Hilla Becher and shoots with the same typological clarity, focusing on a single architectural form and cataloging its variants. Each of the bus shelters in her photographs at Luisotti occupies the center of its frame with declarative plainness. The directness of this approach evolved out of New Objectivity photography of the 1920s and '30s (Renger-Patzsch, Blossfeldt) and into New Topographics of the '70s onward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Turning the Cecil Hotel into homeless housing was supposed to be a quick and innovative way to get skid row residents off the streets. But a proposal for hundreds of homeless units in the hotel collapsed recently in the face of opposition from downtown business leaders and social service providers, backed by Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina. They argued the neighborhood is oversaturated with homeless housing and other services. "Supervisor Molina's strong opinion is that the skid row area is the way it is because of an over-concentration of services," Roxane Marquez, Molina's press deputy, said Friday.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
With the addition of Amazon Fire TV this week, the market for video-streaming devices is getting crowded. And maybe that's why Roku made its latest device so small. The Saratoga, Calif., company recently began shipping the Streaming Stick, a video-streaming dongle that users can discreetly plug into their HDTVs to access online video services such as Netflix, HBO Go and Pandora. Measuring 3.1 inches by 1.1 inches and just 0.5 inch tall, the Streaming Stick takes up a lot less space than Roku's other devices, which resemble hockey pucks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The new dystopian thriller "Divergent" defied the recent trend of young-adult book adaptations faltering on the big screen, topping the weekend box office with an estimated $56-million opening. While that falls short of the first "Twilight" ($69.6 million) and "Hunger Games" ($152.5 million), it's still a solid number that outpaces such YA misses as "The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones" ($9.34 million), "Beautiful Creatures" ($7.6 million), "Vampire Academy" ($7.8 million) and "Ender's Game" ($27 million)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
Let's hear it for the "American Idol" voters. They were spot-on this week. The voters didn't care if the judges told Majesty Rose that her shouty rendition of "Let It Go" was "strong. " Nor were they willing to unquestioningly accept all that Sam Woolf-is-the-next-big-heartthrob propaganda the show has been handing them when his performances have been consistently awkward and underwhelming. And they certainly won't sit idly by when a guy who'd portrayed himself as a down-home country boy suddenly sees fit to lose the backward baseball hat, slick back his hair, groom his scraggly beard, replace his flannel shirt with a velvet jacket and make like Elton John.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Thunderheads, be prepared to set sail this fall. Irish band Celtic Thunder plus a slew of other Irish music performers will headline a four-night cruise aboard the MSC Divina from Miami to the Bahamas. Those who want to immerse themselves in the floating song fest -- from Irish standards to musical theater to a little pop rock -- will be entertained by the band's Keith Harkin, George Donaldson, Ryan Kelly, Neil Byrne and Colm Keegan. The cruise ship leaves Miami and stops at Nassau and the private island of Thunder Bay. Fans receive assigned seating (based on order of sign-up)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998
Regarding the Nov. 2 letter from Winston Steward: I do not believe that gun owners love the danger, they just believe in the Bill of Rights that was written over 200 years ago. And what about the criminal who packs a gun? What other means of protection should we have? Maybe a 750-pound lion! CHERYL HILL Buena Park
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1988
How much deterrence do we need? We have 19-20 submarines at sea at all times, together shipping about 3,000 nuclear warheads. Each boat packs 1,500 times the blasting power of the Hiroshima bomb, enough to levitate every city with over 50,000 population--and all coming down silently out of nowhere without warning. If this isn't enough to discourage them, it's hard to see how the half-billion-dollar B-2 is going to make much difference. VICTOR BOESEN Pacific Palisades
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Judi Dash
Eagle Creek's newest travel bag has all the advantages of big, roomy unstructured duffel and all the hands-free portability of a well-designed backpack. That's because the Systems Go Duffel Pack 60L is both. Used as a backpack, the 2 1/2 -pound, water-resistant bag benefits from a fully padded back panel and adjustable padded back strap, sternum strap, and hip belt. Or you can tuck away the hip belt, detach the back straps and recombine them to create a single cross-body duffel strap.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Shelby Grad
The large 6.9 magnitude earthquake that rattled Northern California on Sunday was the state's largest earthquake in nearly a decade. But it caused no damage or injuries. That's because the quake was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey. By the time the waves reach the shore, they had dissipated significantly. The USGS said the north coast felt only moderate to light shaking.
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