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NEWS
July 26, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many Americans, Bob Richards was teary-eyed as he watched gymnast Kerri Strug vault on a severely sprained ankle to help win the first Olympic gold for U.S. women gymnasts in team competition. "My wife and I bawled like babies," he confessed on Wednesday, the day after the drama unfolded in Atlanta's Georgia Dome. Behind his tears was much more than a spectator's sympathy. In 1952, Richards competed in Olympic pole vaulting with a pulled left hamstring.
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HEALTH
July 5, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Engineer George Lewis would like to move the soothing pain relief of ultrasound out of the doctor's office and into your medicine cabinet. The biomedical engineering student, who is about to receive his doctorate from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., is working on a coin-size device to make ultrasound pain relief available any time, anywhere. Doctors and physical therapists use ultrasound for pain relief for conditions such as muscle spasms, tendonitis, osteoarthritis and sciatica.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
Your article "Many Specialists, but Little Relief for Most Sufferers" (March 22) discusses many important issues in the field of pain management. However, two need to be highlighted. The reason pain is often poorly managed has nothing to do with concerns about prescribing narcotic medications. In fact, nerve pain that responds better to the antidepressant and anticonvulsant medications and bone pain that is better treated with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are just as poorly managed as pain best treated with narcotics.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruling that the former manager of PaineWebber Inc.'s Beverly Hills office should have prevented the theft of customer funds, a Securities and Exchange Commission administrative law judge ordered her suspended for six months from acting as a brokerage supervisor. Patricia A. Johnson, 43, had been in charge of the office from 1984 until mid-1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1997 | EMORY HOLMES II, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Belushi was recalling his first confrontation with the late Tupac Shakur, his co-star in "Gang Related," a cop and crook comic nightmare released Wednesday by MGM that is Shakur's final film. "He was late for the first rehearsal, didn't show up for the second [and was] late for the third, so I turned to him and I go, 'Before we start, I want to get something straight,' " the actor says during an interview in his trailer on the set of the ABC series "Total Security."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2013 | By Scott Glover and Lisa Girion
A Southern California pain doctor who was featured in a 2012 Times investigative article on patient overdose deaths was arrested Tuesday on seven counts of illegally prescribing narcotics and other widely abused drugs. Dr. John Dimowo is charged with prescribing Vicodin, Norco, Adderall and Xanax to undercover agents who pretended to be patients but had no legitimate need for the drugs. Dimowo was not charged in connection with any patient deaths. The Times reported in November that five of Dimowo's patients fatally overdosed on medications he prescribed between 2009 and 2010, coroner's records show.
SPORTS
May 1, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Dwight Howard won't need off-season surgery on his shoulder. Howard was examined on Wednesday by Dr. James Tibone of the Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Group, according to a  Lakers news release.  Tibone's assessment was that "surgery is not necessary at this time. " Howard tore the labrum in his right shoulder on Jan. 4 in a loss to the Clippers. During the season, the Lakers center sat out six games while dealing with soreness related to the tear. In late January, Howard told The Times surgery would knock him out for a lengthy period.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2000 | Bloomberg News
I-Flow Corp.'s stock rose $1.66 a share, or 41%, to $5.69 a share after the Lake Forest maker of infusion systems said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will allow the company to market its new catheter for pain management of large surgical incisions.
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