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Pain Management

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Sen. Orrin Hatch's Pain Relief Promotion Act is aimed at discouraging terminally ill patients from committing assisted suicide to escape intractable pain, a practice that Oregon voters approved in 1994 and other states have since considered. But the Utah Republican's bill, which the Senate will consider Thursday, is hardly true to its name. Its broad provisions, far from improving palliative care, could in fact discourage doctors from effectively treating pain, and it should be defeated.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 2000 | Dow Jones
I-Flow Corp., a Lake Forest maker of low-cost nerve block infusion kits, said Tuesday it has acquired a San Antonio company for $1.5 million in cash and stock. The company said in a news release that the purchase price for privately held Spinal Specialties Inc. consisted of $750,000 of cash and 200,000 shares of common stock. I-Flow said the acquisition should boost earnings this year. Spinal Specialties, which makes custom, disposable products for chronic pain management, had $1.
HEALTH
April 12, 1999
Your article "Many Specialists, but Little Relief for Most Sufferers" (March 22) discusses many important issues in the field of pain management. However, two need to be highlighted. The reason pain is often poorly managed has nothing to do with concerns about prescribing narcotic medications. In fact, nerve pain that responds better to the antidepressant and anticonvulsant medications and bone pain that is better treated with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are just as poorly managed as pain best treated with narcotics.
HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL
Imagine a life without pain. No pounding headache after a hellish day at the office. No cricked back after that awful night on Aunt Millie's lumpy sofa bed. No pangs from injuries, childbirth or food poisoning--no pangs, either, to impel us to yank a finger from a flame, rest a broken leg or refrain from romping through poison oak. Put that way, life without pain would be bad. And short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU and KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mathew Rudes got the ride of his 12-year-old life Thursday when officers from the LAPD's Devonshire Division took him for a spin around the block in a cruiser with its lights flashing and siren blaring. "That was funner than heart surgery," Matt said as officers helped him out of the black and white and into his wheelchair.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1998
Decent intentions have gone awry in a bill by Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) that Congress has fast-tracked for House and Senate votes in the coming week. In an attempt to outlaw assisted suicide, the measure would also make doctors less likely to prescribe adequate painkillers for terminally ill patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John C. Liebeskind, an internationally respected pioneer in pain relief research, has died at age 62. Liebeskind, who taught psychology and anesthesiology at UCLA for more than 30 years, died of cancer Sept. 8, UCLA officials said this week. In the early 1970s, Liebeskind became one of the first to conduct research on brain activity and the sensations of pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The elegant ballroom at the Four Seasons hotel has been the scene of many gala gatherings. But on Saturday, it looked more like a scene from "ER." Beneath the glittering chandeliers, doctors huddled over seven cadavers draped in blue, studying what some call cutting-edge techniques in pain management. They watched as one physician inserted needles and catheters into the spinal area of a well-covered cadaver, demonstrating a process in which medication can be applied to ease cervical pain.
NEWS
July 26, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like many Americans, Bob Richards was teary-eyed as he watched gymnast Kerri Strug vault on a severely sprained ankle to help win the first Olympic gold for U.S. women gymnasts in team competition. "My wife and I bawled like babies," he confessed on Wednesday, the day after the drama unfolded in Atlanta's Georgia Dome. Behind his tears was much more than a spectator's sympathy. In 1952, Richards competed in Olympic pole vaulting with a pulled left hamstring.
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