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NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Ash Wednesday marks a day of sacrifice and penance for Christians in order to atone for sins. The theology of the idea coincides nicely with psychology. Feeling pain, it seems, really cleanses the mind of guilty burdens, according to a new study. Australian researchers tested the idea of whether pain and sacrifice ease guilt. They recruited 62 young men and women under the guise that they were part of a study on mental and physical acuity. The participants were asked to write a short essay about a time when they had ostracized someone.
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NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Unless there is some recognized analgesic effect of rolling a joint, lighting it up and deeply inhaling the by-products of marijuana combustion, then it stands to reason that you could distill the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, and formulate it into, say, a capsule. Doing so would combine the relief that comes with smoked marijuana with the ease of a pill and the quality control that comes with approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Poof! Up in smoke goes the debate about medical marijuana.
SPORTS
March 19, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
When Rebecca Soni took down one of the hallowed barriers in swimming - becoming the first woman to go under 2 minutes and 20 seconds in the 200-meter breaststroke - the moment resonated on multiple levels. Not only did her star turn come on the world stage, at the London Olympics, the modest Soni became the first American swimmer to repeat a gold-medal performance in the breaststroke, winning in 2:19.59. Four years prior, Soni upset the heavily favored Leisel Jones of Australia to own the podium at the Beijing Olympics in the 200 breaststroke.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Lindsey Vonn has been released from a Vail, Colo., hospital after undergoing testing and treatment for intestinal pain. Vonn's spokesman, Lewis Kay, wrote in an email to the Associated Press that the four-time World Cup ski champion was "resting comfortably at home" and that she's "feeling much better" after an overnight stay in the hospital. Kay said it is unclear when Vonn "will be able to return to the mountain” as she prepares for a World Cup event in Aspen on Nov. 24. There has been concern in Vonn's camp regarding her ailment, the cause of which doctors have been unable to determine, according to Kay. Vonn's ski technician, Heinz Haemmerle, said Vonn's recent trip to the hospital was not her first in recent weeks.
SPORTS
August 27, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
OK, enough talk about Lance Armstrong and his possible use of drugs or blood doping as a performance enhancer. It turns out some athletes in the Paralympics, which begins Wednesday in London, use pain as a performance enhancer. Paralympics officials said Monday that, along with testing for banned drugs, they will be on the lookout for something called "boosting" among wheelchair athletes. What is boosting? Pain. In able-bodied athletes, physical exercise raises the heart rate and blood pressure, which helps you perform better during an event.
SPORTS
May 6, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Adrian Gonzalez said on Monday that he intends to play through the discomfort in his neck. The MRI exam Gonzalez underwent earlier in the day revealed a strained neck muscle and nothing more, according to the first baseman. Gonzalez is in the lineup for the Dodgers' series opener against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium. “Basically, it's how much pain you can tolerate,” Gonzalez said. “I'm going to try to play through it and see how it feels when I'm out there running around and doing all those things.” Gonzalez was injured when he collided with an umpire on Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The automatic federal budget cuts brought about the by so-called sequestration are already inflicting some pain on the hotel industry. Federal agencies responded to the cuts by slashing nonessential travel by federal employees, which represent at least 30% of business for some hotels. This month, the 67th annual National Defense Transportation Assn. Forum & Expo -- which was to be held in September in San Antonio -- was called off because of the budget cuts. The association is a nonprofit, educational group focusing on transportation issues for the military.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
When is a mascot not really a mascot? When the Dodgers tell you it isn't. Only don't look now, but bouncing around out there in those new plaza areas behind the pavilions and in the kids' areas in the upper decks is an oversized, oh-so-cute person in a Dodgers uniform with a giant bobblehead who looks amazingly like a mascot. “It's not a mascot,” said Dodgers executive vice president of marketing Lon Rosen. “It's a unique performance character.” See, that's what's great about being a marketing wiz, you can just make stuff up. Rosen also called it a “bobblehead character,” so you can see he's really trying hard.
HEALTH
April 4, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Across cultures and language divides, people talk about the sting of social rejection as if it were a physical pain. We feel "burned" by a partner's infidelity, "wounded" by a friend's harsh words, "crushed" when a loved one fails us, "heartache" when spurned by a lover. There's a reason for that linguistic conflation, says a growing community of pain researchers: In our brains too, physical and social pain share much the same neural circuitry. In many ways, in fact, your brain may scarcely make a distinction between a verbal and physical insult.
HEALTH
February 6, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
OH, your achin' back. It can happen lifting something heavy, or simply reaching for a book. About 85% of adults suffer low back pain at some point in their lives. For most, the pain resolves in a few weeks. For others, it can be long lasting and difficult to treat. Now researchers have found a way to help identify the approximately 20% of back pain patients who might be helped by facet joint injections.
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