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Pain

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After years as a slave to heroin, Craig Einhorn feared that he would never get clean--let alone in a single day. Even though he was on methadone, he was spending as much as $800 a day on the street to buy more drugs just to keep from getting sick. As his weight ballooned to 265 pounds, his vital signs were heading toward zero. And then he got busted. Facing charges of possession with intent to distribute, "I had two choices: jail or death," said Einhorn, 39, a Miami meat cutter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | Steve Appleford
The woman with the electric guitar has played this song before. It's a Michael Jackson ballad, and the young guitarist is named Orianthi, who leans back now to unfurl a solo of smoldering melody before stepping up to the microphone to sing some torrid lyrics: "Love is a feeling / give it when I want it / 'cause I'm on fire / quench my desire. . . ." Orianthi's eyes are closed beneath her blond bangs as she wails "Give In to Me" in a North Hollywood rehearsal studio, her four-piece rock band swaying behind her. The 1991 song (co-authored by Bill Bottrell)
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Unless there is some recognized analgesic effect of rolling a joint, lighting it up and deeply inhaling the by-products of marijuana combustion, then it stands to reason that you could distill the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, and formulate it into, say, a capsule. Doing so would combine the relief that comes with smoked marijuana with the ease of a pill and the quality control that comes with approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Poof! Up in smoke goes the debate about medical marijuana.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A venomous bark scorpion, its stinger poised to strike, confronts a furry, little grasshopper mouse somewhere in the desert. A deadly melee is about to begin and you won't believe who wins. Even though the bark scorpion possesses one of the most painful -- and potentially lethal -- stings in the animal kingdom, he's about to become lunch for a twitchy little rodent.  Thanks to evolution, the grasshopper mouse no longer feels the intense burning, and subsequent throbbing, that humans or other mice feel when injected with scorpion venom -- pain that would stop most predators dead in their tracks.  In fact, after several stings to the face, a grasshopper mouse stops briefly to groom itself, then resumes its savage attack before feasting on the overwhelmed scorpion.
SPORTS
March 19, 2013 | By Lisa Dillman
When Rebecca Soni took down one of the hallowed barriers in swimming - becoming the first woman to go under 2 minutes and 20 seconds in the 200-meter breaststroke - the moment resonated on multiple levels. Not only did her star turn come on the world stage, at the London Olympics, the modest Soni became the first American swimmer to repeat a gold-medal performance in the breaststroke, winning in 2:19.59. Four years prior, Soni upset the heavily favored Leisel Jones of Australia to own the podium at the Beijing Olympics in the 200 breaststroke.
HEALTH
April 4, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Across cultures and language divides, people talk about the sting of social rejection as if it were a physical pain. We feel "burned" by a partner's infidelity, "wounded" by a friend's harsh words, "crushed" when a loved one fails us, "heartache" when spurned by a lover. There's a reason for that linguistic conflation, says a growing community of pain researchers: In our brains too, physical and social pain share much the same neural circuitry. In many ways, in fact, your brain may scarcely make a distinction between a verbal and physical insult.
HEALTH
April 4, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most causes of back pain don't require immediate medical attention, but you should see a doctor right away if your pain is accompanied by any of these "red flags": • Weakness or pain in your legs, especially if it goes all the way down to your feet. • Loss of bladder or bowel control. • Fever or tenderness. The first two could be a sign of neurological damage, caused by compression of the nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord. A fever or tenderness may signal an infection.
OPINION
October 1, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
How lousy has Roman Polanski's life been? His mother died at Auschwitz; his pregnant wife was murdered by the Manson family; and in 1978, after pleading guilty to unlawful intercourse and serving an evaluation period in the Chino state prison, he says he learned that a judge who had led him to believe that he would serve no more jail time actually was considering a long sentence, followed by deportation. On the eve of his sentencing, the acclaimed director of "Rosemary's Baby" and "Chinatown" fled the U.S. and never returned.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Ash Wednesday marks a day of sacrifice and penance for Christians in order to atone for sins. The theology of the idea coincides nicely with psychology. Feeling pain, it seems, really cleanses the mind of guilty burdens, according to a new study. Australian researchers tested the idea of whether pain and sacrifice ease guilt. They recruited 62 young men and women under the guise that they were part of a study on mental and physical acuity. The participants were asked to write a short essay about a time when they had ostracized someone.
SPORTS
May 6, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Adrian Gonzalez said on Monday that he intends to play through the discomfort in his neck. The MRI exam Gonzalez underwent earlier in the day revealed a strained neck muscle and nothing more, according to the first baseman. Gonzalez is in the lineup for the Dodgers' series opener against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium. “Basically, it's how much pain you can tolerate,” Gonzalez said. “I'm going to try to play through it and see how it feels when I'm out there running around and doing all those things.” Gonzalez was injured when he collided with an umpire on Wednesday.
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