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OPINION
July 16, 2009
Lawmakers have pushed their efforts to overhaul the U.S. healthcare system into a higher gear, with a Senate panel approving one Democratic proposal and a House committee starting to debate another. The 1,018-page House bill (HR 3200), which the Democratic chairmen of three committees introduced Tuesday, is a decidedly mixed bag, reflecting the difficulty of making large-scale repairs while preserving the healthcare options people have today.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
Three people dead in an apparent murder-suicide in Hacienda Heights were all suffering from long-term illnesses, said a relative of the victims. Jim Crabtree went to the home in the 15900 block of Ladysmith Street on Wednesday after seeing news reports of a triple-homicide, he told KTLA News . Crabtree said he was married to Rita Delehanty, 62, who along with her father-in-law and mother-in-law, Don and Carol Crabtree, all suffered long-term...
HEALTH
April 4, 2011 | By Karen Ravn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Most causes of back pain don't require immediate medical attention, but you should see a doctor right away if your pain is accompanied by any of these "red flags": • Weakness or pain in your legs, especially if it goes all the way down to your feet. • Loss of bladder or bowel control. • Fever or tenderness. The first two could be a sign of neurological damage, caused by compression of the nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord. A fever or tenderness may signal an infection.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Monte Morin
A venomous bark scorpion, its stinger poised to strike, confronts a furry, little grasshopper mouse somewhere in the desert. A deadly melee is about to begin and you won't believe who wins. Even though the bark scorpion possesses one of the most painful -- and potentially lethal -- stings in the animal kingdom, he's about to become lunch for a twitchy little rodent.  Thanks to evolution, the grasshopper mouse no longer feels the intense burning, and subsequent throbbing, that humans or other mice feel when injected with scorpion venom -- pain that would stop most predators dead in their tracks.  In fact, after several stings to the face, a grasshopper mouse stops briefly to groom itself, then resumes its savage attack before feasting on the overwhelmed scorpion.
OPINION
October 1, 2009 | MEGHAN DAUM
How lousy has Roman Polanski's life been? His mother died at Auschwitz; his pregnant wife was murdered by the Manson family; and in 1978, after pleading guilty to unlawful intercourse and serving an evaluation period in the Chino state prison, he says he learned that a judge who had led him to believe that he would serve no more jail time actually was considering a long sentence, followed by deportation. On the eve of his sentencing, the acclaimed director of "Rosemary's Baby" and "Chinatown" fled the U.S. and never returned.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Unless there is some recognized analgesic effect of rolling a joint, lighting it up and deeply inhaling the by-products of marijuana combustion, then it stands to reason that you could distill the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol, and formulate it into, say, a capsule. Doing so would combine the relief that comes with smoked marijuana with the ease of a pill and the quality control that comes with approval by the Food and Drug Administration. Poof! Up in smoke goes the debate about medical marijuana.
SPORTS
August 27, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
OK, enough talk about Lance Armstrong and his possible use of drugs or blood doping as a performance enhancer. It turns out some athletes in the Paralympics, which begins Wednesday in London, use pain as a performance enhancer. Paralympics officials said Monday that, along with testing for banned drugs, they will be on the lookout for something called "boosting" among wheelchair athletes. What is boosting? Pain. In able-bodied athletes, physical exercise raises the heart rate and blood pressure, which helps you perform better during an event.
NEWS
March 9, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Ash Wednesday marks a day of sacrifice and penance for Christians in order to atone for sins. The theology of the idea coincides nicely with psychology. Feeling pain, it seems, really cleanses the mind of guilty burdens, according to a new study. Australian researchers tested the idea of whether pain and sacrifice ease guilt. They recruited 62 young men and women under the guise that they were part of a study on mental and physical acuity. The participants were asked to write a short essay about a time when they had ostracized someone.
SPORTS
November 14, 2012 | By Dan Loumena
Lindsey Vonn has been released from a Vail, Colo., hospital after undergoing testing and treatment for intestinal pain. Vonn's spokesman, Lewis Kay, wrote in an email to the Associated Press that the four-time World Cup ski champion was "resting comfortably at home" and that she's "feeling much better" after an overnight stay in the hospital. Kay said it is unclear when Vonn "will be able to return to the mountain” as she prepares for a World Cup event in Aspen on Nov. 24. There has been concern in Vonn's camp regarding her ailment, the cause of which doctors have been unable to determine, according to Kay. Vonn's ski technician, Heinz Haemmerle, said Vonn's recent trip to the hospital was not her first in recent weeks.
SPORTS
May 6, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
Adrian Gonzalez said on Monday that he intends to play through the discomfort in his neck. The MRI exam Gonzalez underwent earlier in the day revealed a strained neck muscle and nothing more, according to the first baseman. Gonzalez is in the lineup for the Dodgers' series opener against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium. “Basically, it's how much pain you can tolerate,” Gonzalez said. “I'm going to try to play through it and see how it feels when I'm out there running around and doing all those things.” Gonzalez was injured when he collided with an umpire on Wednesday.
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