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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The music was straightforward: blunt-force punk rock loaded with brawny guitars and set to a galloping beat. The ideas in play, though, were anything but simple. Leading her band Against Me! on Monday night at the Troubadour, Laura Jane Grace roared through “Transgender Dysphoria Blues,” a surging march-tempo number in which she channeled the inner thoughts of someone in conflict with herself. “You want them to see you like they see any other girl,” she bellowed, before acknowledging, “but we can't choose how we're made.” PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Grace sings from experience.
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SPORTS
April 14, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
Dunks bring cheers, not tears. But when Shannon Brown has been putting them in lately, the pain of slamming his right thumb, which is suffering from a bone bruise and a torn ligament, against the metal rim almost brings the Lakers guard to sobs. "It's tough," he said. "I've definitely dunked and had to put a smile on my face to stop from tearing up." He sustained that injury while blocking the shot of Indiana's Dahntay Jones on March 2.
SPORTS
September 3, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
Rafael Nadal would be the first to say he's coming back from sore knees and it's no big thing. Richard Gasquet would be the first to say he's coming back from a raw deal and it's a huge thing. The two young tennis stars played a first-round match on center court at the U.S. Open on Wednesday. Nadal won, as expected. Gasquet showed flashes of brilliance in the 6-2, 6-2, 6-3 defeat, as expected. But this was much more than your routine match. This one had connections, multiple story lines and an off-court soap opera.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
For veteran Emily Cook, the Olympics have been a case study of pain management. The 30-year-old freestyler from Park City, Utah, has been dealing with the lingering pain of a bruised left heel, which has limited her practice time at Cypress Mountain. She will test it on Saturday morning in qualifying for women's aerials. The favorites in the competition include Nina Li of China, her countrywoman Mengtao Xu and Lydia Lassila of Australia. Li was the silver medalist four years ago in Turin.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Many people who suffer with lower back pain rely on glucosamine supplements for some relief. But does the stuff really work? A new study shows that glucosamine was no different from a placebo in treating lower back pain. The study, released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., was a large, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial that included 250 adults with chronic lower back pain. It was conducted at the Oslo University Outpatient Clinic in Norway. Chronic lower back pain plagues millions of people in the U.S., and treatments include physical therapy, medication and the use of glucosamine supplements.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Massage therapy may hit the spot for people suffering from low back pain. A recent study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found that two types of massage--relaxation and structural--improved function and pain for people with low back pain, compared with regular treatment. The study included 401 men and women age 20 to 65 who had nonspecific lower back pain. Two-thirds were randomly assigned to two types of massage: relaxation, or Swedish, massage, non-therapeutic massage not intended for helping with pain; and structural massage, which often concentrates on soft tissue and pain issues.
NEWS
September 28, 2010
You've been dumped by a romantic interest you really liked. You've been passed over for a job by a boss you thought admired you. A group of friends is going out together, leaving you out of their plans. This kind of social rejection prompts your brain to send warning signals to your body that there's been a sudden tear in your personal social fabric, says a new study. Some of those signals you will undeniably feel -- the pain in your gut, the ache in your heart, the lump in your throat.
OPINION
April 28, 2007
Re "Study faults lethal injection," April 24 I am fed up hearing about prisoners suffering a little pain when being executed. What about the pain they caused the people they killed, and the ongoing pain the victims' families suffer long after their deadly deeds? We should be thinking of them, not of the prisoner having a little pain. The condemned deserve to suffer for what they did, and it should be more than just a little pain. RAY GARNETT Santa Clarita
NEWS
October 17, 1996
Re "Rethinking Approaches to Pain Relief" (Oct. 1): I agree that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are potentially dangerous in their potential to cause bleeding ulcers. I will also concede that acute pain after injury is part of the body's way to rest the affected area. However, I think it is somewhat simplistic for Dr. James F. Fries to say there is a sunny side to pain. Is it true that the new approach to treating lower back pain is to do nothing? I disagree. For example, acupuncture has been found to be very useful for this problem.
HEALTH
November 28, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
If you experience neck pain when you perform abdominal crunches lying flat on the floor, try doing this move with a small, partially deflated ball behind your back. The ball assists you in holding the correct position so you don't overuse your neck muscles. You can also use a firm pillow in place of the ball. Sit on a flat, level surface with a small, squishy ball placed behind your lower back. Bend your knees with your feet flat on the floor, hip-width apart. Begin by holding the backs of your thighs and lean back.
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