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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
The music was straightforward: blunt-force punk rock loaded with brawny guitars and set to a galloping beat. The ideas in play, though, were anything but simple. Leading her band Against Me! on Monday night at the Troubadour, Laura Jane Grace roared through “Transgender Dysphoria Blues,” a surging march-tempo number in which she channeled the inner thoughts of someone in conflict with herself. “You want them to see you like they see any other girl,” she bellowed, before acknowledging, “but we can't choose how we're made.” PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Grace sings from experience.
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SPORTS
April 14, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
Dunks bring cheers, not tears. But when Shannon Brown has been putting them in lately, the pain of slamming his right thumb, which is suffering from a bone bruise and a torn ligament, against the metal rim almost brings the Lakers guard to sobs. "It's tough," he said. "I've definitely dunked and had to put a smile on my face to stop from tearing up." He sustained that injury while blocking the shot of Indiana's Dahntay Jones on March 2.
HEALTH
July 5, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Engineer George Lewis would like to move the soothing pain relief of ultrasound out of the doctor's office and into your medicine cabinet. The biomedical engineering student, who is about to receive his doctorate from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., is working on a coin-size device to make ultrasound pain relief available any time, anywhere. Doctors and physical therapists use ultrasound for pain relief for conditions such as muscle spasms, tendonitis, osteoarthritis and sciatica.
HEALTH
July 5, 2010 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The other day, my 9-year-old son came in from throwing the football with his dad, sobbing in pain. My husband told me that he'd twisted his neck when he went out for a long pass; he assured me that there'd been no rough tackles or hard falls. I was initially sympathetic, dispensing a hug and comforting words. It was only when my son insisted that he couldn't possibly eat dinner at the table and needed to be served on the couch that I started to laugh. I had no doubts that his neck hurt him; in fact, I was sure that it did. But as a doctor, I was convinced that it was a minor injury, probably a muscle strain that couldn't hurt too badly.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
For veteran Emily Cook, the Olympics have been a case study of pain management. The 30-year-old freestyler from Park City, Utah, has been dealing with the lingering pain of a bruised left heel, which has limited her practice time at Cypress Mountain. She will test it on Saturday morning in qualifying for women's aerials. The favorites in the competition include Nina Li of China, her countrywoman Mengtao Xu and Lydia Lassila of Australia. Li was the silver medalist four years ago in Turin.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Researchers at USC have made mice insensitive to near-freezing temperatures by deactivating select neurons, a development that could one day lead to new treatments for pain in humans. In a study published Tuesday in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers used a bacterial toxin to kill neurons equipped with so-called TRPM8 channels, cellular structures that help relay sensations of cold. (The pathway is also responsible for sensing menthol, the cooling component of mint.) Neurons that sense heat and mechanical pain were left intact, however.
SPORTS
September 3, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
Rafael Nadal would be the first to say he's coming back from sore knees and it's no big thing. Richard Gasquet would be the first to say he's coming back from a raw deal and it's a huge thing. The two young tennis stars played a first-round match on center court at the U.S. Open on Wednesday. Nadal won, as expected. Gasquet showed flashes of brilliance in the 6-2, 6-2, 6-3 defeat, as expected. But this was much more than your routine match. This one had connections, multiple story lines and an off-court soap opera.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Melissa Healy, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
It's taken an army of mice (and a group of clever Canadian researchers) to crack open an old sexual chestnut and get at the meat inside: For women, "Not tonight dear, I have a headache" is not a passive-aggressive rebuff to a mate's sexual invitation (not always, at least). It's a biological phenomenon with deep evolutionary roots. Even for females who've never watched a 1950s movie or been schooled in the art of sexual gamesmanship, bodily pain puts a serious damper on sexual desire, new research has revealed.
NEWS
July 6, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Many people who suffer with lower back pain rely on glucosamine supplements for some relief. But does the stuff really work? A new study shows that glucosamine was no different from a placebo in treating lower back pain. The study, released Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., was a large, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial that included 250 adults with chronic lower back pain. It was conducted at the Oslo University Outpatient Clinic in Norway. Chronic lower back pain plagues millions of people in the U.S., and treatments include physical therapy, medication and the use of glucosamine supplements.
NEWS
July 5, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Massage therapy may hit the spot for people suffering from low back pain. A recent study in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found that two types of massage--relaxation and structural--improved function and pain for people with low back pain, compared with regular treatment. The study included 401 men and women age 20 to 65 who had nonspecific lower back pain. Two-thirds were randomly assigned to two types of massage: relaxation, or Swedish, massage, non-therapeutic massage not intended for helping with pain; and structural massage, which often concentrates on soft tissue and pain issues.
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