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NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Mindfulness meditation can help ease anxiety, depression and pain, but scientists found little evidence that meditation helped other conditions including substance abuse or sleep and attention problems. The scientists, reporting Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Internal Medicine, noted that many Americans had turned to mindfulness or transcendental meditation to improve their lives and to cope with medical and other problems. But there's little clarity, they said, among healthcare providers about the value of these alternatives to standard medical care.
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SPORTS
December 20, 2013
Hey, Kobe, When I said, "Break a leg," it was just a figure of speech. Jeff Black Beverly Hills :: So when Kobe comes back from this latest injury, is Jim Buss going to sign him to another two-year extension? Matthew Klipper Studio City :: Kobe Bryant's return from injury was short-lived. The Lakers now have to seriously start preparing for "life after Kobe" as it is obvious that the wear and tear and years of playing have begun to break him down. Kobe's insatiable desire to excel and compete are just not enough to combat medical reality and the laws of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Sam Adams
"I'm tired of being funny," sighs West L.A. single mom Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) in Nicole Holofcener's "Enough Said," as she lies next to the man she's just had sex with, the will-we-or-won't-we pressure of their early dates finally ebbing. "Me too," he sighs back. What about Louis-Dreyfus? "Oh, yeah," she says in her Baltimore hotel after a day on the set of her HBO political comedy "Veep," blowing air between pursed lips to add an unspoken, "Are you kidding?" FULL COVERAGE: Oscars 2014 "I relate to [that moment]
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
"Lee Daniels' The Butler" opened in mid-August, and, in the ensuing months, its namesake director has participated in countless Q&As and receptions both to promote the movie and to keep it alive in the Oscar conversation. But Daniels had never been involved in an event quite like the one hosted last night by actor Denzel Washington at the Motion Picture Academy's Goldwyn Theater. Six members of the Freedom Riders, the civil rights activists who defied Jim Crow laws and rode interstate buses into the Deep South in the early '60s, attended the screening and shared their memories during a Q&A following the film.
NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Every shopper's worst nightmare played out in an upscale New Jersey mall over the weekend, turning the joyful Christmas season to ashes for the family of a pair of young lawyers who will gather Wednesday for a funeral.  Carjackers approached Dustin Friedland and his wife, Jamie, in the parking area at the Mall at Short Hills and opened fire. Dustin was gravely wounded and left to die by his assailants, who drove off in his late-model silver Range Rover which was recovered nearby in Newark - a scant 15 minutes away by vehicle but more than a lifetime away in wealth.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Members of Nelson Mandela's family spoke for the first time Saturday of their grief at losing a "great man, a pillar of the family," who was always humble, despite his global fame. Mandela's family, deeply sensitive about the intense global media interest in his upcoming funeral, is walking a difficult line between a need for privacy to grieve, and the sense that Mandela belonged to to the world. The family is deeply concerned about the possibility of photographs circulating of Mandela lying in state, according to a spokeswoman for the Government Communication and Information System.
NATIONAL
December 4, 2013 | By Tina Susman
As residents of Newtown, Conn., awaited the release Wednesday of 911 records from the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre a year ago, the city's top elected official said their unsealing would “create a new layer of pain” for the city. “Imagine yourself as a parent of a child who was killed, or a family member of one of the six educators,” First Selectman Pat Llodra said in a statement hours before the police complied with a judge's order to make the recordings public. The Associated Press, which led the 11-month battle to make the recordings public, reported Wednesday that a review of them showed that dispatchers responded calmly and assured callers trapped in the school that help was on the way.   The dispatchers also urged people inside the school to take cover and asked about the condition of children with them, AP reported.
HEALTH
November 29, 2013 | By Elise Oberliesen
Ever wonder why some people, even under adverse circumstances, set goals and achieve them effortlessly? Some of them, undoubtedly, are hard-wired to succeed. They just set themselves in a direction and their mind handles the rest. But that ability is atypical; most of us, at one time or another, are daunted by illness or other mental or physical challenges. That's where hypnosis can come in. Experts in a variety of fields say that patients become highly focused and open to suggestions when they are in a trance-like state.
SPORTS
November 22, 2013 | By Ben Bolch
  Steve Nash doesn't know when he'll come back, how he'll feel or whether he can be an effective player again. There is one certainty for the Lakers point guard: He's not contemplating retirement because of persistent back pain that has sidelined him for nearly two weeks. "No, not at all," Nash said Friday of rumors he is considering calling it a career long before his contract expires at the end of next season. "I don't know where that came from. "For me, I realize I have about 18 months left of basketball and I want the most out of this that I can possibly get and I don't know if that's going to be one game or the vast majority of what's left, but I have a long life without basketball, so I don't want to give in too soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A growing minority of Americans believes that doctors should do anything possible to save a life, no matter what, instead of saying there are some situations in which a patient should be allowed to pass away, the Pew Research Center found in a survey of nearly 2,000 adults. In addition, an increasing number of people say that even if they were suffering an incurable disease and were in severe pain, they would not ask their doctors to halt treatment. The surge in such attitudes surprises bioethicists who want physicians and families to carefully weigh aggressive medical treatments for patients near death.
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