Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPaint
IN THE NEWS

Paint

ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If George Clooney's "The Monuments Men" did nothing else, it made possible the theatrical re-release of "The Rape of Europa," a splendid documentary that shows the true story behind the Nazi theft of European art and interviews some of the real-life Monuments Men who got it back. The film is packed with information and also tells a series of wonderful truth-is-stranger-than-fiction tales. "The Rape of Europa" even details the postwar fights about who owns which paintings that culminated in the sale of Gustav Klimt's gold portrait for a record $135 million.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials in France returned three paintings that were confiscated by Nazi forces during World War II to the descendants of the paintings' rightful owners at a ceremony in Paris on Tuesday. The three works of art were a painting by 16th century Flemish artist Joos de Momper titled "Mountainous Landscape"; "Madonna and Child" by the 14th century Italian painter Lippo Memmi; and an 18th century portrait of a woman by an unknown painter. In a ceremony presided over by Aurélie Filippetti, France's minister of culture and communication, she said the French ministry of culture will be more proactive in researching the provenance of disputed works of art, according to a report in Le Monde.
HOME & GARDEN
March 10, 2014
Want to do something more creative with your tight living quarters but don't know where to start? Interior designer Heather Ashton offers some suggestions on how to deliver a big jolt of personality to a small living space. PHOTOS: At home with Heather Ashton Don't be scared of paint: Most people think a color, especially a darker tone, makes a small space look smaller. But you aren't fooling anyone, so have fun with it. Paint is an easy way to add personality and dimension to a room.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be Biebers. In video clips from a deposition taken last Thursday in Miami, Justin Bieber at 20 looks like little more than a petulant child - and attention to the clips might be getting under the singer's skin. "Love how some people love to twist and justify the horrible action of others. We all have a right to defend ourselves and feel harassed," he tweeted Monday, hours after the tapes started making the rounds. PHOTOS: Justin Bieber's tattoos The clips, culled by TMZ from 4½ hours of deposition footage (related to a paparazzo's lawsuit alleging he was attacked by one of the singer's bodyguards)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Christopher Knight
Myths die hard. Especially creation myths. Messing with the symbolic origins of a world isn't something to be undertaken lightly. Jackson Pollock's mammoth 1943 painting "Mural" - nearly 8 feet high, 20 feet wide and covered edge-to-edge with rhythmic, Matisse-like linear arabesques, muscular abstract shapes and piercing voids, all of which he likened to a frenzied mustang stampede - was something entirely new for American art. The great painting represents...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Inevitably, the recent paintings of multicolored dots by B. Wurtz put a viewer in mind of Damien Hirst, he of the thousands of paintings with grids of multicolored circles on a white background. Hirst was neither the first nor only artist to harness the visual theme; but the sheer volume of his parodies of abstract painting colonized the territory, like white cells overwhelming the art-world bloodstream, giving him the dull equivalent of a brand. All the more reason that Wurtz's dot paintings at Richard Telles Fine Arts, seven of which are in the New York-based artist's first solo show at the gallery in several years, are so captivating.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Anticipation is an undercurrent running through recent work by New York-based artist Rory Devine -- anticipation and imminent loss, if not exactly dread. Two-dozen paintings on canvas and paper, plus one video showing only a fellow absent-mindedly riffing chords on an electric guitar, employ motifs both figurative and abstract, recognizable and allusive. Devine's art is determined to focus on present experience instead of promises of future reward, a point well-taken. Dour but not bleak, the work could still benefit from even greater immediacy of engagement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
The annex at Michael Benevento Gallery holds three large paintings of three-masted sailing ships at sea, the kind that proliferated during the colonizing age of exploration that began half a millennium ago. Shown in various states of full and partial sail, and largely drawn in black acrylic on white painted canvas, these are the vessels whose sailors scanned the globe during their unprecedented journeys. In the main gallery a few doors away, painter Mark Roeder continues a similar scan in what could be called full sail.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
Oscar's animated feature race is a clash of the major Hollywood studios this year, with Disney, Fox/DreamWorks and Universal/Illumination all contending. But one movie in the mix -- a French-Belgian production about the unlikely friendship between a mouse and a bear -- is the sort that is alien to the high-stakes U.S. animation industry. Made with hand-painted watercolor backgrounds and a modest $12-million price tag, "Ernest & Celestine," which U.S. distributor GKIDS will release in Los Angeles on Friday, is based on a whimsical series of children's books by reclusive Brussels-born author Gabrielle Vincent.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
Celebrated for his more-is-more interior designs, Hollywood legend Tony Duquette (1914-99) was, fittingly, more of a Renaissance man. He not only decorated the homes of Mary Pickford, Elizabeth Arden, J. Paul Getty and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, but he also designed costumes and sets for the stage and MGM musicals, crafted jewelry and sculpture for the jet-set elite and was the first American artist to have a solo exhibition at the Louvre in...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|