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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Two paintings that the Nazis forced a Jewish art dealer to sell off in the 1930s have been returned to his estate, and its heirs said Wednesday they were working hard to recover hundreds more. The Max Stern estate is trying to recover all of the estimated 400 works sold off from Stern's collection between 1935 and 1937, estate representative Clarence Epstein said. Only 25 have been located thus far, he said. The returned paintings -- "Flight From Egypt," by the circle of Jan Wellens de Cock, and "Girl From the Sabine Mountains," by Franz Xaver Winterhalter -- will be loaned to art museums in Canada for display.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Mark Stock, a painter known for his evocative portraits of white-gloved butlers and sad, stylish women in slinky gowns, has died. He was 62. Stock, who died Wednesday at an Oakland hospital, had an enlarged heart, his publicist Charlotte Parker said. His most famous painting, "The Butler's in Love - Absinthe," a study of a butler scrutinizing a lipstick smear on an empty glass, inspired a short David Arquette film, "The Butler's in Love" (2008). It is one of more than 100 Stock paintings featuring butlers, often in poses suggesting suppressed longing or brooding disappointment.
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WORLD
June 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Police in Marseille, France, recovered a Monet landscape and three other paintings that gunmen had stolen in August from the Museum of Fine Arts in Nice, judicial officials said. The paintings were discovered in a parked utility vehicle, the prosecutor's office said. Together, they are worth about $1.55 million, police have said. The paintings were Monet's 1897 "Cliffs Near Dieppe," the 1890 "Lane of Poplars at Moret" by fellow Impressionist Alfred Sisley and Flemish master Jan Brueghel the Elder's 17th century "Allegory of Earth" and "Allegory of Water."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Both the title and the contents of Keltie Ferris' show, "Doomsday Boogie," bring to mind Piet Mondrian, especially his acclaimed painting, "Broadway Boogie Woogie" (1942-3). The Brooklyn-based Ferris, too, trades in planar, geometric -- or at least loosely so -- shapes, arranged with a nod to the rhythms of urban life. Her paintings, made with sprayed oil pigments, feel like unkempt street versions of several more elegant precedents, not just the work of Mondrian but also Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Five paintings by U.S. pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein were stolen from a museum close to Stockholm early Friday. Thieves broke into the Aaberg Museum in Baalsta outside the Swedish capital just after 2 a.m. and stole three Lichtenstein artworks and two Warhol paintings, museum Chief Executive Carina Aaberg said. The stolen pieces have a value of about $500,000, she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Italian police have recovered 10 masterpieces that were stolen in 2004 from an ancient religious complex in Rome, officials said Tuesday. Officers located the paintings in December. The works were wrapped in newspapers and hidden in the trailer of a suspected art smuggler, police said. Investigators believe the man was about to take the works abroad to sell them, Carabinieri paramilitary police art squad chief Gen. Giovanni Nistri said. The suspect is under investigation for receiving stolen goods but is not believed to be behind the theft.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | PAUL YOUNG
I wasn't alive when the Neorealist movement shattered the staid cinematic conventions of post-WWII Italy. But ever since I fell in love with that style of filmmaking I've become aware that realism, as an aesthetic, always surfaces in times of difficulty and change. Yet war and panic also inspire escapist fantasies, abstraction and private, invented worlds. So I was pleased to see both tendencies in the fascinating paintings of Pierpaolo Campanini at Blum & Poe (blumandpoe.com, through April 5)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | reuters
A curator at the Louvre in Paris has stumbled upon some unknown drawings on the back of a painting by Leonardo da Vinci that look like they might be by the Italian master himself, the museum said Thursday. The extraordinary find was made by chance, when Louvre staff unhooked Leonardo's "The Virgin and Child With Saint Anne" from the museum wall as part of a broad program of study and restoration of paintings by Leonardo. "The Virgin and Child With Saint Anne" was painted in the early 1500s and no one had previously noticed the drawings -- at least not to the knowledge of the Louvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Controversy continues to swirl around the collection of paintings Georgia O'Keeffe donated to Fisk University in Nashville. In March, a judge permanently banned any sale of the 101-piece collection -- which not only includes works by O'Keefe but also Picasso, Renoir and Cezanne -- and set an October deadline for Fisk to retrieve the artwork from storage and put it on display. The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in New Mexico had sued to gain the rights over the collection because of the school's attempts to sell paintings and because they weren't currently on display.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2008 | Associated Press
Two portraits whose authenticity was in doubt have been verified as real Van Goghs, the museum named for the Dutch master confirmed Friday. One portrait is the face and torso of a woman in a hat. In the second, a lady sits with gloved hands folded in her lap. Because the themes were so common in the 19th century and the paintings had little similarity to the rest of the work by Vincent van Gogh, their authorship was in doubt, said spokeswoman Natalie...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By David Ng
The Maier Museum of Art at Randolph College in Virginia has received a rare sanction from a national organization of museum directors for the recent decision to sell a valuable George Bellows painting in order to fund college operations. Leaders at the Assn. of Art Museum Directors said in a release on Wednesday that the sale of Bellows' 1912 "Men of the Docks" constituted a "violation of one of the most fundamental professional principles of the art museum field. " The sale "not only erodes the credibility and good standing of the Maier Museum, but also affects all art museums and the trust that the public has placed in them," the group said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If George Clooney's "The Monuments Men" did nothing else, it made possible the theatrical re-release of "The Rape of Europa," a splendid documentary that shows the true story behind the Nazi theft of European art and interviews some of the real-life Monuments Men who got it back. The film is packed with information and also tells a series of wonderful truth-is-stranger-than-fiction tales. "The Rape of Europa" even details the postwar fights about who owns which paintings that culminated in the sale of Gustav Klimt's gold portrait for a record $135 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By David Pagel
The lines in Bart Exposito's new paintings at Thomas Solomon Gallery do things the lines in his old paintings didn't: slip away from the shapes they demarcate to float in spaces that are more atmospheric than anything the artist has painted since he began exhibiting 15 years ago. This transformation may have something to do with Exposito's recent move from Los Angeles to Santa Fe and his commute to Albuquerque, where he teaches. Like the landscape he drives through, most of his new works are horizontal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials in France returned three paintings that were confiscated by Nazi forces during World War II to the descendants of the paintings' rightful owners at a ceremony in Paris on Tuesday. The three works of art were a painting by 16th century Flemish artist Joos de Momper titled "Mountainous Landscape"; "Madonna and Child" by the 14th century Italian painter Lippo Memmi; and an 18th century portrait of a woman by an unknown painter. In a ceremony presided over by Aurélie Filippetti, France's minister of culture and communication, she said the French ministry of culture will be more proactive in researching the provenance of disputed works of art, according to a report in Le Monde.
HOME & GARDEN
March 10, 2014
Want to do something more creative with your tight living quarters but don't know where to start? Interior designer Heather Ashton offers some suggestions on how to deliver a big jolt of personality to a small living space. PHOTOS: At home with Heather Ashton Don't be scared of paint: Most people think a color, especially a darker tone, makes a small space look smaller. But you aren't fooling anyone, so have fun with it. Paint is an easy way to add personality and dimension to a room.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Mamas, don't let your babies grow up to be Biebers. In video clips from a deposition taken last Thursday in Miami, Justin Bieber at 20 looks like little more than a petulant child - and attention to the clips might be getting under the singer's skin. "Love how some people love to twist and justify the horrible action of others. We all have a right to defend ourselves and feel harassed," he tweeted Monday, hours after the tapes started making the rounds. PHOTOS: Justin Bieber's tattoos The clips, culled by TMZ from 4½ hours of deposition footage (related to a paparazzo's lawsuit alleging he was attacked by one of the singer's bodyguards)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Mark Stock, a painter known for his evocative portraits of white-gloved butlers and sad, stylish women in slinky gowns, has died. He was 62. Stock, who died Wednesday at an Oakland hospital, had an enlarged heart, his publicist Charlotte Parker said. His most famous painting, "The Butler's in Love - Absinthe," a study of a butler scrutinizing a lipstick smear on an empty glass, inspired a short David Arquette film, "The Butler's in Love" (2008). It is one of more than 100 Stock paintings featuring butlers, often in poses suggesting suppressed longing or brooding disappointment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Christopher Knight
Myths die hard. Especially creation myths. Messing with the symbolic origins of a world isn't something to be undertaken lightly. Jackson Pollock's mammoth 1943 painting "Mural" - nearly 8 feet high, 20 feet wide and covered edge-to-edge with rhythmic, Matisse-like linear arabesques, muscular abstract shapes and piercing voids, all of which he likened to a frenzied mustang stampede - was something entirely new for American art. The great painting represents...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
The annex at Michael Benevento Gallery holds three large paintings of three-masted sailing ships at sea, the kind that proliferated during the colonizing age of exploration that began half a millennium ago. Shown in various states of full and partial sail, and largely drawn in black acrylic on white painted canvas, these are the vessels whose sailors scanned the globe during their unprecedented journeys. In the main gallery a few doors away, painter Mark Roeder continues a similar scan in what could be called full sail.
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