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January 14, 2009 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Italian police have recovered 10 masterpieces that were stolen in 2004 from an ancient religious complex in Rome, officials said Tuesday. Officers located the paintings in December. The works were wrapped in newspapers and hidden in the trailer of a suspected art smuggler, police said. Investigators believe the man was about to take the works abroad to sell them, Carabinieri paramilitary police art squad chief Gen. Giovanni Nistri said. The suspect is under investigation for receiving stolen goods but is not believed to be behind the theft.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By David Colker
Robert Olsen, a critically acclaimed artist known for his luminescent paintings of outdoor urban objects such as gas pumps and ATMs, would drive around Los Angeles all night looking for interesting items to photograph and then later paint. "I try to isolate the ubiquitous," Olsen said to a reporter who accompanied him on a drive for a 2002 Los Angeles Times article . "I like to look at these things as mathematical models. " Times art critic Christopher Knight chose Olsen, whose works almost never portrayed humans, as one of L.A.'s top painters under 45 . "The pictures have the specificity and presence of portraiture," Knight wrote in 2007, "resonating with the bleak beauty of American life today.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2008 | PAUL YOUNG
I wasn't alive when the Neorealist movement shattered the staid cinematic conventions of post-WWII Italy. But ever since I fell in love with that style of filmmaking I've become aware that realism, as an aesthetic, always surfaces in times of difficulty and change. Yet war and panic also inspire escapist fantasies, abstraction and private, invented worlds. So I was pleased to see both tendencies in the fascinating paintings of Pierpaolo Campanini at Blum & Poe (blumandpoe.com, through April 5)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By David Pagel
Right now, the most beautiful place in all of Los Angeles may very well be the center gallery of Gary Lang's exhibition at Ace Gallery Beverly Hills. Eleven big, circular paintings, each a candy-colored rainbow of concentric rings, fill the space with enough visual warp and woof to make repeat visits thrilling. The setup is symmetrical: three dazzling paintings on each of three long walls and two more flanking the door through which you entered. The size of Lang's paintings matters, and it's measured in feet: 6, 9½, 11 and 13 at their diameters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | reuters
A curator at the Louvre in Paris has stumbled upon some unknown drawings on the back of a painting by Leonardo da Vinci that look like they might be by the Italian master himself, the museum said Thursday. The extraordinary find was made by chance, when Louvre staff unhooked Leonardo's "The Virgin and Child With Saint Anne" from the museum wall as part of a broad program of study and restoration of paintings by Leonardo. "The Virgin and Child With Saint Anne" was painted in the early 1500s and no one had previously noticed the drawings -- at least not to the knowledge of the Louvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Controversy continues to swirl around the collection of paintings Georgia O'Keeffe donated to Fisk University in Nashville. In March, a judge permanently banned any sale of the 101-piece collection -- which not only includes works by O'Keefe but also Picasso, Renoir and Cezanne -- and set an October deadline for Fisk to retrieve the artwork from storage and put it on display. The Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in New Mexico had sued to gain the rights over the collection because of the school's attempts to sell paintings and because they weren't currently on display.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
I dropped in at Regen Projects in Hollywood to see my friend Lari Pittman's new show, just installed and opening to the public on Saturday. The exhibition is very large - a whopping 92 paintings on canvas, panel and mostly paper - but the three mammoth works that anchor the main room dwarf everything. Titled as various “Flying Carpets,” each one is a boggling 10 feet high and 30 feet wide. No doubt there are many reasons for the daunting scale, which fits the work's overall theme of epic trauma - and equally epic possibility -- during what the artist has dubbed today's “Late Western Impaerium.” The spelling alone, with its Old World allusion to ancient Rome, reeks of life lived under crushing conditions of supreme power.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
No Entropic school of art has announced itself as such, but the concept seems to animate a good deal of drawn and painted work of the past decade or more -- images of intense and unpredictable energy, change and disorder. Julie Mehretu might be considered a chief practitioner. The speed and unwieldiness of the information age is one clear source for the vocabulary of charged, global fluidity; a post-9/11 tenor of physical and political uncertainty is likely another. The increasingly volatile collision of nature and culture, in the form of large-scale natural disasters, is yet another catalyst for this type of work.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Both the title and the contents of Keltie Ferris' show, "Doomsday Boogie," bring to mind Piet Mondrian, especially his acclaimed painting, "Broadway Boogie Woogie" (1942-3). The Brooklyn-based Ferris, too, trades in planar, geometric -- or at least loosely so -- shapes, arranged with a nod to the rhythms of urban life. Her paintings, made with sprayed oil pigments, feel like unkempt street versions of several more elegant precedents, not just the work of Mondrian but also Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Too much of a good thing can be wonderful, Mae West famously quipped. She might have been standing in front of a Lari Pittman painting. The three epically-scaled works anchoring Pittman's show at Regen Projects forsake " or" to exuberantly embrace " and . " They -- and to only a slightly lesser extent the show's other paintings on canvas and paper -- are high-energy operatic productions. Even the titles tend to be prolonged and dramatic. The three 9-by-30-foot extravaganzas are named: "Flying Carpet With a Waning Moon Over a Violent Nation;" "Flying Carpet With Petri Dishes for a Disturbed Nation;" and "Flying Carpet With Magic Mirrors for a Distorted Nation.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
Seemingly from the moment Cuban refugee Yasiel Puig showed up at Dodger Stadium out of nowhere, arriving last June unwilling to discuss his unknown background, the talk behind the batting cages has been rife with unprintable rumors. There were rumors Puig was smuggled out of Cuba by members of a Mexican drug cartel. There were rumors he still owed the smugglers money, and that his life could be in jeopardy. There was talk about Puig being essentially owned by a Miami businessman with a criminal record who hired those smugglers in exchange for 20% of the ballplayer's future earnings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
INDIO, Calif. - In the sprawl of desert scrub brush and freeway ramps that is this industrial part of Indio, the sun burns brightly in a barren office park. Light and shadows flash off the scorched asphalt, and the landscape is a spare palette of dusty brown, faded green and gray. Inside one tucked-away structure, however, artist Phillip K. Smith III is preparing to paint the sky red. Or pink. Or green, depending. FULL COVERAGE: Coachella 2014 "Welcome to the different sides of my brain," Smith says, leading the way through his studio, which looks like an airplane hangar and is filled with elements of a light installation premiering at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By David Ng
The security guard is an art critic? A painting that recently sold at auction in Hong Kong for about $3.7 million is feared to have been thrown out in the trash, according to reports from China.  "Snowy Mountain" by contemporary Chinese artist Cui Ruzhuo was sold by the Chinese firm Poly Auction at the Grand Hyatt hotel in Hong Kong. The ink painting, which depicts a snowy mountainscape, sold for 28.8 million Hong Kong dollars.  ART: Can you guess the high price? Officials in Hong Kong are reportedly searching landfills after the South China Morning Post said security footage shows a guard kicking the painting to a pile of garbage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
It's not uncommon for museums to encroach upon what used to be the exclusive turf of galleries, to indulge in a bit of reputation inflation by showcasing recent MFAs rather than waiting for them to season and mature. In turn, some galleries, driven by a different set of credibility-attuned motives, have assumed museum-like practices, mounting historically significant exhibitions, complete with scholarly publications. Kayne Griffin Corcoran's John Tweddle show is of this ilk. It's guest-curated by Alanna Heiss, founder of PS1 (now MoMA PS1)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By David Ng
Former President George W. Bush unveiled some of his paintings of world leaders -- including a portrait of himself -- in an interview Friday on NBC's "Today" show conducted by his daughter, Jenna Bush Hager. The paintings will be part of the former president's first solo art exhibition, "The Art of Leadership: A President's Personal Diplomacy," opening this month at the  George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum  in Dallas. The exhibition, which opens Saturday and runs through June 3, will feature two dozen never-before-exhibited portraits created by Bush, as well as personal artifacts, photographs and other items that will tell the story of his relationship with international leaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Roberto Gil de Montes is truly a citizen of the world. The 62-year-old artist -- whose first solo show in nearly 10 years opens at Bergamot Station's Lora Schlesinger Gallery on Saturday -- was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, and as a teenager, his family lived in East Los Angeles. He's spent the last nine years living in the small beach town of Nayarit and in Echo Park, where he still keeps a home, while also traveling extensively throughout India and Europe for inspiration, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Cecily Brown seems as though she's belting it out in her large, athletically brushed paintings now at Gagosian. But instead of powerful and passionate, her voice comes across as detached. The volume is turned up, but the verve is on low. London-born and living in New York, Brown bases several of her recent paintings on a photograph of a large group of nude women that appeared on the British release of a 1968 Jimi Hendrix album. PHOTOS: Arts and culture in pictures by The Times Brown preserves the odd theatricality of the image, with all members of the ensemble facing us, seated or in semi-seductive forward leans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Mark Stock, a painter known for his evocative portraits of white-gloved butlers and sad, stylish women in slinky gowns, has died. He was 62. Stock, who died Wednesday at an Oakland hospital, had an enlarged heart, his publicist Charlotte Parker said. His most famous painting, "The Butler's in Love - Absinthe," a study of a butler scrutinizing a lipstick smear on an empty glass, inspired a short David Arquette film, "The Butler's in Love" (2008). It is one of more than 100 Stock paintings featuring butlers, often in poses suggesting suppressed longing or brooding disappointment.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2014 | By Leah Ollman
Both the title and the contents of Keltie Ferris' show, "Doomsday Boogie," bring to mind Piet Mondrian, especially his acclaimed painting, "Broadway Boogie Woogie" (1942-3). The Brooklyn-based Ferris, too, trades in planar, geometric -- or at least loosely so -- shapes, arranged with a nod to the rhythms of urban life. Her paintings, made with sprayed oil pigments, feel like unkempt street versions of several more elegant precedents, not just the work of Mondrian but also Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko.
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