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TRAVEL
September 19, 2010
INDIA Village walking tour Shakti Tours' "Kumaon Village Experience" transports travelers to a land of resplendent views and rich cultural heritage. You'll leave bustling Delhi behind for an intimate walking tour that laces together the villages of the Himalayan foothills and concludes each day with an authentic overnight home stay. Itinerary: Delhi to Sarai Rohilla, Kathgodam, Deora, Alai, Jwalabanj and back to Delhi Dates: Multiple departure dates between Oct. 1 and April 30 Price: Starting at $1,245, double occupancy ($1,995 for single travelers)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Tony Perry
In recent years it's become a truism that the American military promises "no man left behind" when it goes to war. But in World War II, that promise was often not achievable and may not even have been a priority. More than 73,000 Americans remain missing in action and presumed dead from World War II. Of those, 47,000 disappeared in the Pacific during the "island hopping campaign" that can be said to have begun at Guadalcanal in 1942 and ended in Okinawa in 1945. Tracking down the remains of the MIAs and piecing together their final moments is the daunting, emotionally fraught quest - undertaken by civilians and the military - at the heart of "Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II," a deeply reported, compellingly written book by Wil S. Hylton, a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine.
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OPINION
June 17, 2009
Re "Uighurs: Trouble in paradise?" June 14 In your article about the Palau receiving Uighur prisoners from Guantanamo, you mentioned that the resident population of 20,000 receives about $20 million in aid from the U.S. annually, and a new aid package could exceed $200 million. That equates to $10,000 per resident of Palau. Coincidentally, under that new package, per person that would be about the same amount of money per member of my household that I am forced to pay the federal government in income taxes.
TRAVEL
September 19, 2010
INDIA Village walking tour Shakti Tours' "Kumaon Village Experience" transports travelers to a land of resplendent views and rich cultural heritage. You'll leave bustling Delhi behind for an intimate walking tour that laces together the villages of the Himalayan foothills and concludes each day with an authentic overnight home stay. Itinerary: Delhi to Sarai Rohilla, Kathgodam, Deora, Alai, Jwalabanj and back to Delhi Dates: Multiple departure dates between Oct. 1 and April 30 Price: Starting at $1,245, double occupancy ($1,995 for single travelers)
NATIONAL
June 10, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
U.S. officials have persuaded the tiny Pacific island nation of Palau to accept some of the Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, representing a major step in the Obama administration's plan to close the prison. In a statement released to the Associated Press today, Palau President Johnson Toribiong said his government had "agreed to accommodate the United States of America's request to temporarily resettle in Palau up to 17 ethnic Uighur detainees . . . subject to periodic review."
WORLD
June 22, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The police came to Aye Aye Thant's home late one night soon after the ruling Myanmar junta had declared her a dangerous political dissident. The officer was a family friend who came with a discreet warning: Thant and her cousin, a Buddhist monk, would soon be thrown into prison. So the pair fled their native land, paying $250 apiece, they say, to bribe immigration officials to let them slip out of the troubled military-ruled nation on a plane bound for Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
NEWS
August 24, 1987
Voters in the western Pacific island chain of Palau have overwhelmingly approved a political and economic agreement with the United States. The unofficial tally from the Friday referendum showed 73% of the voters supporting the Compact of Free Association. Under the pact, Palau would receive nearly $1 billion in U.S. economic aid over a 50-year term and the 400-mile-long archipelago would become self-governing. Palau, with about 14,000 residents living on eight inhabited islands, is the last U.
TRAVEL
July 25, 2004
Regarding "Palau," July 11: I lived in the Pacific in Guam for four years. I had the opportunity to be in Palau many times. Although Rosemary McClure didn't trek out to Peleliu to see the rusted Japanese and U.S. tanks from World War II, she covered some of the spirit of visiting Palau. Like her, I ventured to the prison to buy a storyboard. The picture in the paper does not do the carved work justice because it is painted. The natural stained boards are priceless. McClure's article made me want to go back there.
WORLD
June 23, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Only a few of the Guantanamo detainees Palau has agreed to resettle have shown interest in moving to the remote Pacific nation, its government said today. The 13 Turkic Muslims from far western China are concerned about the island nation's ability to provide for their safety, according to a government statement. Palau made headlines this month when it consented to President Obama's request to take the Uighurs as part of plans to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center in Cuba.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration says at least six, and as many as eight, Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will soon leave their island prison for freedom on the island nation of Palau. Word of the transfer to the tiny Pacific Ocean country, planned for sometime after Oct. 1, came in a letter released Thursday from Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. Kagan also confirmed that Palau had agreed to accept all but one of the 13 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who remain at Guantanamo.
WORLD
November 1, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Six Chinese Muslims released from Guantanamo Bay but still wanted at home as separatists arrived on their new tropical island home of Palau, which accepted a U.S. request to resettle the men. The tiny Pacific nation agreed in June to Washington's request to temporarily resettle the men, who have been held by the U.S. since their capture in Afghanistan and Pakistan in 2001. The Pentagon determined last year that the Uighurs were not "enemy combatants," but they had remained in legal limbo as the U.S. was unwilling to send them to China and sought other countries willing to take them.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The Obama administration says at least six, and as many as eight, Chinese Muslims held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, will soon leave their island prison for freedom on the island nation of Palau. Word of the transfer to the tiny Pacific Ocean country, planned for sometime after Oct. 1, came in a letter released Thursday from Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court. Kagan also confirmed that Palau had agreed to accept all but one of the 13 Chinese Muslims, or Uighurs, who remain at Guantanamo.
WORLD
June 22, 2009 | John M. Glionna
The police came to Aye Aye Thant's home late one night soon after the ruling Myanmar junta had declared her a dangerous political dissident. The officer was a family friend who came with a discreet warning: Thant and her cousin, a Buddhist monk, would soon be thrown into prison. So the pair fled their native land, paying $250 apiece, they say, to bribe immigration officials to let them slip out of the troubled military-ruled nation on a plane bound for Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
OPINION
June 17, 2009
Re "Uighurs: Trouble in paradise?" June 14 In your article about the Palau receiving Uighur prisoners from Guantanamo, you mentioned that the resident population of 20,000 receives about $20 million in aid from the U.S. annually, and a new aid package could exceed $200 million. That equates to $10,000 per resident of Palau. Coincidentally, under that new package, per person that would be about the same amount of money per member of my household that I am forced to pay the federal government in income taxes.
WORLD
June 17, 2009 | John M. Glionna
They carried Sgt. Jasper Obakrairur's body home Tuesday in a casket draped with an American flag for a service held inside a domed government complex modeled on the U.S. Capitol. Obakrairur wasn't American, but a 26-year-old native of this Pacific island nation. He joined the U.S. Army five years ago, inspired by a sense of duty and a plan for a better life. Known as Jazz by island friends, and as Sgt. O.B.
WORLD
June 15, 2009 | John M. Glionna
When asked by the United States to accept a group of hard-to-place Guantanamo inmates, Palauan President Johnson Toribiong mulled over the request as both a head of state and a criminal defense lawyer. The 62-year-old politician says he considered the plight of the 13 Chinese men as he had countless other defendants during two decades as one of this tiny Pacific island nation's top litigators. The men, ethnic Uighurs, had gotten a raw deal, he said, jailed for years without trial.
TRAVEL
July 11, 2004 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
An underwater armada sailed by my dive mask, turned as if on cue and sailed by again -- a dozen bright splashes of color sparkling in the calm, clear water. These yellow-tailed fusiliers were showing off for a clumsy human intruder, I thought, and I laughed. Clumsy, indeed. I exploded to the surface coughing. I'd forgotten you can't laugh underwater; I'm always so excited when I'm nose to nose with a school of fish that I overlook the limitations of having a snorkel clenched between my teeth.
WORLD
March 27, 2006 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Tommy Remengesau Jr., the president of this tiny Pacific nation, will never forget the day four decades ago when he went sailing on his bamboo raft and returned with more fish than his family could eat. He figured his parents would be pleased. Instead, his father hit him on the head and lectured him on the principles of conservation. "I thought I was a hero," the president recalled. "But my father said, 'What are you going to do with the rest of this fish?' I never forgot that lesson."
WORLD
June 14, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Sipping guava juice under cover from a steamy tropical downpour, Tommy Remengesau Jr. says he's always considered his Pacific island home a refuge from the troubles of the outside world. "While the rest of the planet was in conflict, waging its wars, we remained a little piece of paradise," the former Palauan president said as his pet fruit bat swayed upside down in a nearby cage. "Now, the world's headaches have come home to roost in Palau."
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