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Paleontology

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, Orange County has required that fossils and other artifacts dug up by developers with county permits remain within its borders. But unlike its neighbors, the county never established a bona fide museum where million-year-old whale bones and other treasures can be researched by scientists and viewed by children.
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SCIENCE
February 25, 2006 | From Associated Press
The discovery of the remains of a furry, beaver-like animal that lived at the time of dinosaurs has overturned more than a century of scientific thinking about Jurassic mammals. The find shows that the role of mammals in the time of dinosaurs was greater than previously thought, said Zhe-Xi Luo, curator of vertebrate paleontology at Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a decade, Orange County has required that fossils and other artifacts that are dug up by developers with county permits remain within its borders. But unlike its neighbors, the county never established a bona fide museum where million-year-old whale bones and other treasures can be researched by scientists and viewed by children.
SCIENCE
January 30, 2010 | By Amina Khan
The long-dead bones of a four-winged dinosaur, the cat-sized Microraptor gui , have inspired lively argument among present-day paleontologists. How, they ask, did such an animal coast through the skies? For a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers took an unusual approach to test the 125-million-year-old dinosaur's flight capability -- they built a life-size model microraptor from a beautifully preserved fossil skeleton found in China.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
On a shale-covered hillside on the inaccessible northern shore of Greenland, British and Danish researchers have for the first time found intact fossils of one of the first complex animals to inhabit the Earth, a discovery that sheds new light on a crucial period of evolution that is still largely hidden by time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
For months, maybe years, hikers trekking along the muddy creek bed stamped over it, mistaking it for a large rock. But Daryll Hansen knew differently. The amateur paleontologist could tell the flat gray hump protruding from the dusty sandstone was a rare prehistoric gem: a 5-foot-long baleen whale skull left from millions of years ago when Aliso Creek in Lake Forest was underwater.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2006 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
The fossilized remains of what may be the largest meat-eating dinosaur has been discovered in Argentina -- a bus-sized monster that attacked its prey in roving packs, scientists announced Monday. The remains of at least seven of the beasts, named Mapusaurus roseae, were found clustered in 100-million-year-old rocks south of the city of Plaza Huincul in western Patagonia.
NEWS
July 29, 1994 | BILL HARLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bob Cassaday, 68, wields a cheap but wicked looking commando knife to scrape sandstone from around a bony protuberance on a hillside. "This has got me mildly excited," says Cassaday, a retired Navy lieutenant commander from Escondido. Paleontologist Kraig Derstler watches over Cassaday's shoulder. "That's a posterior rib for sure," Derstler tells him. "Way posterior." Within an hour, Cassaday has uncovered about 10 inches of brown, shiny bone that once belonged to a duckbill dinosaur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1988 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
Diamonds discovered in Africa suggest that the earth could be older than previously estimated, reports Japanese paleontologist Minoru Kojima of Tokyo University. He said a Japanese team had found 10 small diamonds in Zaire which were 6 billion years old. A broadly accepted theory puts the age of the earth and other planets in the solar system at 4.5 to 4.6 billion years.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | JOHN SCHWARTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Fossil remains discovered in Argentina appear to support the theory that birds descended from dinosaurs, scientists announced Tuesday. More than 20 bone fragments extracted from a green sandstone hill in the Patagonia region come from a previously unknown ancient critter whose pelvis resembles both dinosaurs and birds and whose shoulder is uncannily bird-like. The flightless creature stood nearly 4 feet tall, was about 7 1/2 feet long and ran on two legs. Paleontologist Fernando E.
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