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Paleontology

NEWS
August 3, 2001 | STEPHANI SUTHERLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists long have suspected that dinosaurs were land animals. Only recently, however, have the giants of the Earth been depicted as the terrestrial creatures they were. To get a true picture, a small but significant change needed to be made in the dinosaurs' appearance. They needed a nose job. A study by Ohio University paleontologist Lawrence Witmer found that the traditional depiction of dinosaur nostrils was wrong.
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NEWS
June 4, 2001
University of Pennsylvania archeologists have unearthed a gargantuan dinosaur in a corner of Egypt that paleontologists have ignored since World War II, when earlier finds from the region stored in German museums were blasted from existence by Allied warplanes. They report in Friday's Science that the new species, dubbed Paralititan stromeri, or tidal giant, walked in ancient mangrove swamps in what is now the Sahara Desert.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | WILLIAM McCALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The early cousin of Tyrannosaurus rex had a much weaker bite than the most fearsome predator ever to roam Earth, so it may have relied on the sharpness of its teeth and a tough but lightweight skull to slash and tear flesh from its prey, a study suggests. Allosaurus fragilis (pronounced fruh-JILL-iss) was an extremely successful hunter that survived for millions of years chasing down larger and smaller dinosaurs alike during the late Jurassic period before Tyrannosaurus emerged.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | USHA LEE McFARLING, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Earth's greatest mass extinction--an Armageddon that wiped out nearly all life on the planet 250 million years ago--may have been triggered by a massive meteor collision like the one that millions of years later helped end the reign of the dinosaurs, a team of scientists reported Friday.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | ERIC LAX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alas, poor Eugene Dubois! No one knew him well. A paleontologist whose greatest joy was to hold a skull and discern its evolutionary place (he once noticed the prominent forehead and lantern jaw of a waiter in a Paris restaurant and exclaimed, "Look at that skull! What I would give to have one like it for my collection!"), Dubois was a total failure at connecting with people. But with bones, he was a genius.
NEWS
February 18, 2001 | COLLEEN LONG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Inside a cramped church basement, rows of folding tables overflow with dinosaur footprints hacked from bedrock or molded with plaster. Prints from all over the world line the walls. No glass barriers protect the artifacts from curious hands. A stegosaur print the width of a stove caught the eye of visitor Erick Probeck, 5, who said he thought it was "the biggest footprint in the whole world." "I love it here. I want to come back tomorrow," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a plentiful fishery, once starting at Wilshire Boulevard near MacArthur Park, stretching up Vermont Avenue, over Cahuenga Pass and into the San Fernando Valley. It has yielded more than 2,200 fish. But none of them are good eating, since many have had more than 8 million years to age to a fossilized state. These fossils, all excavated during the Red Line subway construction, represent 64 extinct fish species, and 39 of them are new discoveries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a plentiful fishery, once starting at Wilshire Boulevard near MacArthur Park, stretching up Vermont Avenue, over the Cahuenga Pass and into the San Fernando Valley. It has yielded more than 2,200 fish. But none of them are good eating, since many have had more than 8 million years to age to a fossilized state. These fossils, all excavated during the Red Line subway construction, represent 64 extinct fish species, more than half of them new discoveries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000 | MATT SURMAN and GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aaron Plunkett went out for a January day of angling at Lake Casitas, and though it wasn't a particularly good day for fish, the Ojai resident came home with a monumental catch: a 25-million-year-old whale. It was a find--a few pieces of fossilized bones--that has the experts excited.
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