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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1989
As one who treasures my friendship with Philip M. Klutznick, and enjoys a continuous exchange of views and information, I'll observe with great interest how the Jewish "establishment" spokespersons will react to his sage advice as to negotiations with the PLO in Israel's need for peace ("Palestine Needs a State, Too," Op-Ed Page, Jan. 10). Will they distribute Phil's opinion piece to their constituency for independent judgment(s), or skewer his remarks? If the treatment Stanley Sheinbaum and the others in the "Stockholm five" received is any example, Klutznick will be the target of abuse and distortion of purpose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Maher Abukhater
RAMALLAH, West Bank - The presence of three words on a letterhead - "State of Palestine" - is keeping Palestinian patients from being transferred from the Gaza Strip to hospitals in East Jerusalem or Israel, officials on both sides acknowledged Wednesday. Israel informed the  Palestinian Authority on Tuesday that it would no longer accept the patients if the transfer letter issued by the Palestinian Ministry of Health contains those words. Palestinian authorities expressed surprise, saying the phrase had been used on official documents since late 2012, when the United Nations upgraded the Palestinian Authority's status to that of a nonmember observer "state" rather than "entity.
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OPINION
May 26, 2006
Sandy Tolan suggests in "The incredible shrinking Palestine" (Current, May 21) that the U.S. should be wary of Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's plan for Israel to withdraw from territory in the West Bank. What does Tolan think would be a better plan -- to wait around and see what better solution Hamas proposes? Tolan states that it "is too early to be sure which direction the Hamas-run Palestinian government will take." How many times does Hamas have to state its intention to destroy Israel before Tolan will be "sure"?
WORLD
May 3, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Google has switched the tagline on its Palestinian website, replacing the words “Palestinian territories” with “Palestine” in both English and Arabic. Google spokesman Nathan Tyler said the company consulted "a number of sources and authorities when naming countries" and was following the lead of organizations such as the United Nations, the Internet Corp. for Assigned Names and Numbers and the International Organization for Standardization. "We're changing the name 'Palestinian Territories' to 'Palestine' across our products,” Tyler said in a statement emailed to the Los Angeles Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988
Apparently Pfaff feels he has a license to rewrite Jewish history. "The West Bank never belonged to Israel." "It was Ottoman territory until World War I." Really, now! And from whom did the Ottoman Turks and their predecessors steal it? The West Bank is a name invented by the Jordanians as a modern-day technique emulating the Romans of old--change the name to eliminate the Jewish connection with the land. The so-called West Bank is Judea and Samaria, and all international maps prior to 1948, including Ottoman maps, so stated.
OPINION
October 24, 2011 | By Timothy E. Wirth
The Palestinian bid for statehood recognition by the United Nations is almost certain to be rejected if it is taken up by the Security Council. But as early as this week, the governing assembly of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization could grant the Palestinians membership in that organization. If this happens, as is widely expected, the United States would have to resign from UNESCO because of a 20-year-old law forbidding the payment of dues by the U.S. to any U.N. body that accepts Palestine as a member.
WORLD
March 17, 2003 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Wearing jeans and a long-sleeved polo shirt, elbows on his knees, the 15-year-old looks and talks like any American teenager. His dream is to study computer engineering in California, where many of his relatives live. The young Jordanian's passion, though, is "Palestine" -- a place that no longer exists on most maps, and whose historical boundaries for the last 50 years have been entangled with those of Israel.
BOOKS
October 26, 1986
Of this map, Nebenzahl writes: "Istakhri's map of Syria/Palestine appears in his atlas of twenty-one maps entitled BOOK OF ROADS AND COUNTRIES, compiled in 952. Both scientific and aesthetic principles guided the design of these atlases, which were intended as fine literature for a highly cultured court... One of the difficulties for the modern view is that the map, with south at the top, appears to be upside down.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | TRACY WILKINSON and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With or without Israel's permission, Palestine is about to be born. Whether this month, as some Palestinian leaders insist, or a bit later, the declaration of an independent Palestinian state seems all but inevitable and will crown a 52-year quest for legitimacy and homeland that has been at the heart of the most enduring conflict in the Middle East. But what will this state, Palestine, look like, and how will it function?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's something shambling and unassuming about "The Flat," a home-movie quality to much of its footage. But it's not just any home that's being examined, and that makes all the difference. Israel's top-grossing documentary of last year as well as the winner of that country's best documentary award, "The Flat" succeeds by being wide-ranging as well as particular. It tells an out-of-the-ordinary personal story and examines broad historical issues of societal memory and selective amnesia, of what is hidden between generations and what is revealed.
OPINION
March 29, 2013
Re "Palestinian politics do matter," Opinion, March 24 Khaled Elgindy, a former advisor to Palestinian leadership, is right when he says, "The United States does not have to like Palestinian politics or endorse its themes or outcomes - any more than it needs to embrace the appointment of pro-settlement and anti-peace figures to Israel's Cabinet - but it does need to acknowledge them. " Israelis are fond of saying, "How can you expect us to negotiate with organizations that want to destroy our state?"
WORLD
November 30, 2012 | Carol J. Williams
Thursday's overwhelming U.N. vote to elevate the status of Palestine at the world body inflicts yet another fracture in the facade of Western solidarity, exposing a divide among European Union and NATO member states over U.S. policy in the Middle East. Israel, Canada, Panama, the Czech Republic and four tiny Pacific island states were the only ones in the 193-member U.N. General Assembly siding with the U.S. in its quixotic vote against the Palestinian Authority's request for nonmember observer state status.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's something shambling and unassuming about "The Flat," a home-movie quality to much of its footage. But it's not just any home that's being examined, and that makes all the difference. Israel's top-grossing documentary of last year as well as the winner of that country's best documentary award, "The Flat" succeeds by being wide-ranging as well as particular. It tells an out-of-the-ordinary personal story and examines broad historical issues of societal memory and selective amnesia, of what is hidden between generations and what is revealed.
OPINION
November 2, 2011
In past decades, Palestinian nationalists thought they had to hijack planes or blow up Israeli civilians in order to attract international attention. Some still do, but moderate leaders are lately discovering that the path to recognition might lie instead through the United Nations. On Monday, they won a key victory when Palestine — a state that doesn't technically exist — was granted membership in the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. That's giving the Obama administration fits and angering pro-Israel members of Congress from both U.S. political parties, but regardless of how one feels about the proper borders of Israel, the Palestinian switch to a diplomatic strategy represents progress.
WORLD
October 31, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
A decision by the United Nations' cultural organization to admit Palestine as a member state set off a confrontation between the U.S. and the U.N., threatening to strip Washington of influence in several key international agencies while cutting off a major source of contributions to the world body. The Obama administration said it would end funding for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization hours after the group Monday voted 107 to 14 to accept the Palestinian Authority as a full member.
OPINION
October 24, 2011 | By Timothy E. Wirth
The Palestinian bid for statehood recognition by the United Nations is almost certain to be rejected if it is taken up by the Security Council. But as early as this week, the governing assembly of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization could grant the Palestinians membership in that organization. If this happens, as is widely expected, the United States would have to resign from UNESCO because of a 20-year-old law forbidding the payment of dues by the U.S. to any U.N. body that accepts Palestine as a member.
NEWS
October 18, 2001
Slain Palestinian--Some editions of Wednesday's paper contained an erroneous second reference to Mustafa Zibri, the slain leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
WORLD
September 15, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Rebuffing international pressure to soften their positions and return to the negotiating table, Israelis and Palestinians announced separately Thursday that they were moving forward with an expected diplomatic battle next week at the United Nations. Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas will address the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 23, after which he will submit a formal application to admit Palestine into the international body as a state, according to his foreign minister, Riad Malki.
OPINION
September 15, 2011 | By Reza Aslan
Later this month, the Palestinian Authority intends to go before the United Nations to request recognition of an independent Palestinian state. Although there is strong backing for the bid, the United States, in the name of supporting Israel, has stated its willingness to use its Security Council veto power to keep the Palestinians from joining the U.N. as a full voting member. The U.S. has also refused to join in a more symbolic General Assembly vote that could change the Palestinians' status from a "nonvoting observer entity" to a "nonvoting observer state.
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