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Palestinian Women

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WORLD
August 3, 2012 | By Maher Abukhater, Los Angeles Times
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Four recent cases of Palestinian women slain allegedly at the hand of relatives have prompted women and human rights groups to demand tougher laws against domestic violence and more stringent enforcement. Several female activists marched Thursday through the streets of Bethlehem in the West Bank demanding justice for women in this patriarchal and traditional society. They also demanded severe punishment for men who kill or batter a female family member. Women carried placards reading "No to murder, yes to life" and "Shame on us Palestinians who kill our women.
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WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Rising expectations of newlyweds living in their own homes and broader use of family planning in certain parts of the Arab world have drastically changed population dynamics in the region, with women marrying later and having few children, the statistics firm Gapminder reported Friday. In a series of graphics compiled and posted on the company website, the sharp demographic trends in Tunisia and Libya are offered as examples of the shift away from early marriage and frequent childbirth in Arab nations.
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WORLD
December 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Women faced pressure not to run as candidates in Palestinian local elections. But they did, and more than half of them defeated their male opponents in this conservative, traditional Arab society. Palestinian women won 51 seats in Thursday's elections, 32 of them winning their places outright without having to claim seats reserved for women by Palestinian law.
WORLD
August 3, 2012 | By Maher Abukhater, Los Angeles Times
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Four recent cases of Palestinian women slain allegedly at the hand of relatives have prompted women and human rights groups to demand tougher laws against domestic violence and more stringent enforcement. Several female activists marched Thursday through the streets of Bethlehem in the West Bank demanding justice for women in this patriarchal and traditional society. They also demanded severe punishment for men who kill or batter a female family member. Women carried placards reading "No to murder, yes to life" and "Shame on us Palestinians who kill our women.
WORLD
March 3, 2005 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Bashful and soft-spoken, Fatheyeh Rimawi concedes that she knows little about how the government works. The 30-year-old former teacher surprised many in January by being elected mayor of Beit Rima and a neighboring village, the first Palestinian woman to win such a post, during ongoing municipal balloting in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police or shepherds or hikers find them: the bloodstained bodies of women, murdered and dumped outside West Bank villages and towns. A woman discovered recently by a bulldozer driver near the village of Beit Jala had been bound hand and foot and decapitated. Sometimes, they have been strangled, shot or burned alive. More often, the victim has been stabbed or hacked to death. The murderer, if apprehended, nearly always turns out to be a close male relative--father, brother, cousin, uncle.
WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Rising expectations of newlyweds living in their own homes and broader use of family planning in certain parts of the Arab world have drastically changed population dynamics in the region, with women marrying later and having few children, the statistics firm Gapminder reported Friday. In a series of graphics compiled and posted on the company website, the sharp demographic trends in Tunisia and Libya are offered as examples of the shift away from early marriage and frequent childbirth in Arab nations.
NEWS
July 16, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan's daughter Maureen denounced South Africa's system of racial discrimination today but warned Third World delegates at the U.N. women's conference against forcing a general debate on the subject. Reagan, addressing more then 4,000 delegates to the conference from 155 countries, also said the U.S. delegation she heads does not object to discussing the plight of Palestinian women but added that talks should focus on women's concerns and not politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995
After carefully reading "Paying a High Price for Honor" (March 12), it is very clear to me that condoning the murder of Palestinian women has nothing to do with "honor," but a lot to do with Palestinian men keeping full control of Palestinian women. If these men truly felt that they couldn't live with what "their" women may have done, they would be committing suicide, not murder. The world's oldest cop-out is for men to attach their "honor," or lack of it, to a woman's sexuality, real or imagined.
NEWS
October 11, 1995 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Israeli-Palestinian peace accord moved forward in fits and starts Tuesday when the Israeli government began releasing several hundred Palestinian prisoners amid much confusion and handed over a military occupation office in the West Bank village of Salfit. As the prisoner release began, an adviser to Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat petitioned the Supreme Court to override the government's refusal to pardon female prisoners involved in the murder of Israelis. Dr.
WORLD
June 27, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Naila Ayesh's path to becoming a Muslim activist for women's rights began when she miscarried in an Israeli detention center in 1987 after being arrested for belonging to a Palestinian student union. Today Ayesh, 49, founder of the Gaza Strip-based Women's Affairs Center, has become one of the only feminist voices in the seaside territory that was seized three years ago by Hamas, an armed Palestinian group that aspires to impose Islamic law. Besides being married to Jamal Zakout, a top advisor to Prime Minister Salam Fayyad of the Fatah-led Palestinian Authority — Hamas' political rival that rules the West Bank — Ayesh also raises eyebrows in Gaza as she moves in public without covering her head and sometimes even partakes of a shisha water pipe.
WORLD
November 4, 2006 | Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi abu Alouf, Special to The Times
About 200 Palestinian women broke through an Israeli troop and tank cordon around a mosque Friday to serve as human shields, allowing dozens of armed militants to flee an Israeli siege, but only after two of the women were killed. Answering a call from the Hamas radio station, the women took to the streets in a mass public intervention of a kind rarely seen in this conservative Muslim society. They carried extra robes and veils with them to disguise some of the militants holed up in the mosque.
WORLD
March 3, 2005 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
Bashful and soft-spoken, Fatheyeh Rimawi concedes that she knows little about how the government works. The 30-year-old former teacher surprised many in January by being elected mayor of Beit Rima and a neighboring village, the first Palestinian woman to win such a post, during ongoing municipal balloting in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
WORLD
December 28, 2004 | From Associated Press
Women faced pressure not to run as candidates in Palestinian local elections. But they did, and more than half of them defeated their male opponents in this conservative, traditional Arab society. Palestinian women won 51 seats in Thursday's elections, 32 of them winning their places outright without having to claim seats reserved for women by Palestinian law.
OPINION
November 29, 1998 | Ann Brenoff, Ann Brenoff is an assistant editor on the Op-Ed page of The Times
Women in Saudi Arabia today may not drive cars or be alone with men who are not immediate relatives. Amnesty International says women in this Arab nation are at risk of being detained and accused of immoral behavior merely for walking alone or not wearing a head scarf. Iraqi women may not appear in public unveiled. In Iran, earlier this year, three women were arrested on charges that they had voluntary sexual relations outside marriage. The penalty they faced: being stoned to death.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a year of delays, Israel on Tuesday began freeing its female Palestinian prisoners, fulfilling a commitment made in the interim peace agreement signed in 1995. But there were hitches until the end, with last-minute legal appeals and emotion-charged pleas from Israelis seeking to block the official pardons and freedom for the 31 women, several of whom were involved in killings of Jews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from across the United States to talk about AIDS in Africa, poverty in Latin America and problems that confront women throughout the world. "There's just a wonderful thing that happens when women get together with their hearts to find ways to help those less fortunate than us," Susan Baker, the wife of former Secretary of State James A. Baker III, told the 200 women gathered Friday at the Sutton Place Hotel.
NEWS
May 10, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
Governments of the world must adjust to the "new reality" by providing day care for children and getting men to share the housework if women are to contribute to economic growth, the leader of the forthcoming Nairobi Women's Conference said this week. Leticia Shahani, secretary-general of the 1985 world conference that will review the United Nations' Decade for Women ending this year, spoke to reporters after a preparatory group had completed its work. A U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from across the United States to talk about AIDS in Africa, poverty in Latin America and problems that confront women throughout the world. "There's just a wonderful thing that happens when women get together with their hearts to find ways to help those less fortunate than us," Susan Baker, the wife of former Secretary of State James A. Baker III, told the 200 women gathered Friday at the Sutton Place Hotel.
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