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June 6, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
After 31 years, the Museum of Television & Radio, which operates facilities in Beverly Hills and New York, said Tuesday that it was changing its name to the Paley Center for Media. The change is intended "to better reflect MTR's evolution to a center that convenes media leaders and enthusiasts for programs that explore and illuminate the immense and growing impact of all media on our lives, culture and society," the organization said in a news release. The new name also honors William S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
In her prolific career, singer Margaret Whiting recorded 500 songs, including such signature hits as "It Might as Well Be Spring," "That Old Black Magic" and "Baby It's Cold Outside. " Along with such legends as Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald, Whiting was regarded as one of the premiere interpreters of what is known as the Great American Songbook - songs written by such renowned composers and lyricists of the 20th century as George and Ira Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, Oscar Hammerstein II, Frank Loesser, Johnny Mercer and Richard Whiting, Margaret's father.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
A reunion of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," a tribute to writer-producer Judd Apatow and salutes to several first-year series highlight the 25th annual William S. Paley Television Festival being announced today. Organized by the Paley Center for Media, the festival will be held for the first time this year at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood instead of the center's Beverly Hills facility. It runs March 14-27.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Television series may be canceled quickly or run out of steam after several seasons, but the special ones never really die. They live on in our collective memories. And thanks to cable, the Internet and DVD, these vintage series are becoming more than just fond recollections. Clint Walker, the tall, ruggedly handsome former security guard and bouncer who became an overnight sensation 57 years ago as the heroic scout in the first hour-long television western, ABC's "Cheyenne," has his own website at http://www.clintwalker.com to keep up with the worldwide demand for autographs and pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Long before TMZ, Perez Hilton, "Access Hollywood" and "Entertainment Tonight" invaded Hollywood, there was "Miss Rona." With her distinctive voice and fashionably short hairdo, Rona Barrett was one of the first celebrity journalists to become a celebrity herself. She broke ground in the 1970s by pioneering the concept of in-depth, one-on-one TV interviews, inviting stars to share intimate and sometimes painful details of their lives. Barrett interviewed Cher as they both sat on her bed and gossiped about Sonny Bono.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Television series may be canceled quickly or run out of steam after several seasons, but the special ones never really die. They live on in our collective memories. And thanks to cable, the Internet and DVD, these vintage series are becoming more than just fond recollections. Clint Walker, the tall, ruggedly handsome former security guard and bouncer who became an overnight sensation 57 years ago as the heroic scout in the first hour-long television western, ABC's "Cheyenne," has his own website at http://www.clintwalker.com to keep up with the worldwide demand for autographs and pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
In her prolific career, singer Margaret Whiting recorded 500 songs, including such signature hits as "It Might as Well Be Spring," "That Old Black Magic" and "Baby It's Cold Outside. " Along with such legends as Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald, Whiting was regarded as one of the premiere interpreters of what is known as the Great American Songbook - songs written by such renowned composers and lyricists of the 20th century as George and Ira Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart, Oscar Hammerstein II, Frank Loesser, Johnny Mercer and Richard Whiting, Margaret's father.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
For fans of TV history, a walk through the "Television: Out of the Box" show at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills is like a grand stroll through our collective past. Visitors to the exhibition, which celebrates nearly 60 years of Warner Bros. television, can view such items as Clint Walker's buckskin costume from the western "Cheyenne" and Connie Stevens' sundress from "77 Sunset Strip. " From more modern times, there's a section devoted to NBC's long-running medical drama "ER," which features such items as George Clooney's stethoscope and the County General Hospital badges worn by the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | Susan King
As a youngster in the 1970s, Mike Henry, the executive producer and co-creator of "The Cleveland Show," Fox's upcoming animated spinoff of its hit "Family Guy," would have a "Yabba-dabba-doo" time sitting on shag carpet in the living room of his childhood home watching Hanna-Barbera cartoons such as "The Flintstones," "Scooby-Doo" and "The Jetsons." "It's all I watched as far as animated stuff goes," says Henry, who also supplies the voice of Cleveland, among other characters on the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lesley Ann Warren's first audition for the title role in CBS' 1965 version of the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II musical, " Cinderella" was an unmitigated disaster. Warren was all of 18 but had garnered great notices for her supporting role as Snookie on Broadway in "110 in the Shade," the musical version of "The Rainmaker." "Cinderella" director Charles S. Dubin had seen Warren in "110" and thought she would be perfect. (Rodgers and Hammerstein's only original musical for TV had aired live to great acclaim in 1957 with Julie Andrews in the starring role.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
For fans of TV history, a walk through the "Television: Out of the Box" show at the Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills is like a grand stroll through our collective past. Visitors to the exhibition, which celebrates nearly 60 years of Warner Bros. television, can view such items as Clint Walker's buckskin costume from the western "Cheyenne" and Connie Stevens' sundress from "77 Sunset Strip. " From more modern times, there's a section devoted to NBC's long-running medical drama "ER," which features such items as George Clooney's stethoscope and the County General Hospital badges worn by the cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010 | By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times
Long before TMZ, Perez Hilton, "Access Hollywood" and "Entertainment Tonight" invaded Hollywood, there was "Miss Rona." With her distinctive voice and fashionably short hairdo, Rona Barrett was one of the first celebrity journalists to become a celebrity herself. She broke ground in the 1970s by pioneering the concept of in-depth, one-on-one TV interviews, inviting stars to share intimate and sometimes painful details of their lives. Barrett interviewed Cher as they both sat on her bed and gossiped about Sonny Bono.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Lesley Ann Warren's first audition for the title role in CBS' 1965 version of the Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II musical, " Cinderella" was an unmitigated disaster. Warren was all of 18 but had garnered great notices for her supporting role as Snookie on Broadway in "110 in the Shade," the musical version of "The Rainmaker." "Cinderella" director Charles S. Dubin had seen Warren in "110" and thought she would be perfect. (Rodgers and Hammerstein's only original musical for TV had aired live to great acclaim in 1957 with Julie Andrews in the starring role.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | Susan King
As a youngster in the 1970s, Mike Henry, the executive producer and co-creator of "The Cleveland Show," Fox's upcoming animated spinoff of its hit "Family Guy," would have a "Yabba-dabba-doo" time sitting on shag carpet in the living room of his childhood home watching Hanna-Barbera cartoons such as "The Flintstones," "Scooby-Doo" and "The Jetsons." "It's all I watched as far as animated stuff goes," says Henry, who also supplies the voice of Cleveland, among other characters on the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2008 | From a Times staff writer
A reunion of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," a tribute to writer-producer Judd Apatow and salutes to several first-year series highlight the 25th annual William S. Paley Television Festival being announced today. Organized by the Paley Center for Media, the festival will be held for the first time this year at the ArcLight Cinemas in Hollywood instead of the center's Beverly Hills facility. It runs March 14-27.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
After 31 years, the Museum of Television & Radio, which operates facilities in Beverly Hills and New York, said Tuesday that it was changing its name to the Paley Center for Media. The change is intended "to better reflect MTR's evolution to a center that convenes media leaders and enthusiasts for programs that explore and illuminate the immense and growing impact of all media on our lives, culture and society," the organization said in a news release. The new name also honors William S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2010 | By Susan King, Times Staff Writer
In her new autobiography, "One From the Hart," Stefanie Powers finally opens up on her near-decade love affair with William Holden, the Oscar-winning actor who starred in such classics as "Stalag 17," "Sunset Boulevard" and "Network. " She hopes the book helps to set the record straight on Holden, a raging alcoholic who managed to stay off the bottle for long lengths of time while with Powers. But Holden, a notorious loner, would often slip, disappearing from view while on a bender.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2010
'Bing Crosby: A Holiday Celebration' When: Wednesday at 7 p.m. Where: The Paley Center for Media, 465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills Admission: $15 for members; $20 for general public Information: http://www.paleycenter.org
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