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NEWS
July 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Drug charges were filed Monday against socialite Mary Alice Firestone Asher, her second husband and her son, authorities said. Mrs. Asher, 49, of Palm Beach, was charged with possessing marijuana, drug paraphernalia and cocaine, said Craig Salisbury of the state attorney's office. John Asher, 61, a Kentucky industrialist, was charged with possession of cocaine. Mark Firestone, 22, Mrs. Asher's son from her marriage to tire heir Russell H. Firestone Jr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2002 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mollie Wilmot, a Palm Beach socialite who lived next door to the Kennedy family estate and regularly entertained the likes of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor in grand style, was not used to having uninvited guests.
NEWS
November 11, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before it all began, Mary E. Lupo was known in these parts as a respectable lower-court jurist, a churchgoing mother of two and a tap-dance aficionado. Now she's the "scowling judge" of Palm Beach County, and a sour concoction served at a local saloon is her namesake. Before it all began, Assistant State Atty. Moira Lasch was known as the early-rising, clean-living former Florida Prosecutor of the Year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sullivan's Travels" is director Preston Sturges' acclaimed 1941 satire about a successful Hollywood director who decides to live the life of a hobo for a drama he intends to make. What he discovers, however, is what those facing the harsh realities of poverty and suffering really want is a good laugh. That's exactly what Sturges gave audiences in his next movie, "The Palm Beach Story," which is about as far from the gritty world of the road, flophouses and chain gangs as imaginable.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1995 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Freedom Communications Inc., in a major step to expand its media holdings, said Wednesday that it has agreed to buy the CBS television affiliate in West Palm Beach, Fla., for an undisclosed price. The all-cash deal for privately held WPEC-TV is Freedom's first acquisition of a television station in a decade and gives the Irvine media chain a boost in its recent efforts to diversify its operations and its territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1991 | CARYL RIVERS, Caryl Rivers is a professor of journalism at Boston University and author of "Indecent Behavior" (Dutton/NAL). and
Any woman who has cause to accuse a man of sexual misconduct--and is wondering how to comport herself if she does so--will get cold comfort from two major public dramas that have played out on our television screens of late. There, unfolding in our living rooms, were two compelling stories in which women charged powerful men with sexual offenses.
NEWS
February 19, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
The dirt on major celebrities was being dished but good by writers and publicists at the small dinner party. In the midst of it all, squealing with delight at the stories of who was sleeping with whom, and who had the biggest cocaine problem, was the guest of honor: Roxanne Pulitzer. The irony was inescapable.
TRAVEL
November 1, 1992 | STEPHEN WILLIAMS, NEWSDAY
Give Palm Beach a few days. Odds are you'll love it. Or loathe it. Get past the south Florida blue sky and sunshine, the sea-breezy heat, the mellow bathtub-warm surf. Next to the weather, what Palm Beach stuffs in your face is money. Wealth. Bucks. Moolah. Gelt. A few years back, someone deliberately drove a 1965 Rolls Royce into Lake Worth to give scuba divers something to explore. Palm Beach money is understated, like the sunken Rolls. We're not talking ostentation or glitz a la Rodeo Drive.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Palm Beach police on Friday named William Kennedy Smith, nephew of Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), as the suspect in an alleged rape of a 29-year-old woman at the Kennedy family mansion here on Easter weekend. It was decided to publicly name Smith as the suspect after the woman who filed the complaint identified his photo, a source close to the case said. The woman's name is being withheld by police.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2005 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
When the bottom falls out of your world, perhaps the best thing to do is laugh. The motion picture industry seemed to sense this in the 1930s, after the Depression put such heavy burdens on everyday life. People needed to be taken out of themselves -- to shake off their troubles -- if only for a while. So Hollywood turned out comedies, many satirizing the rich but clueless and often featuring at their core a crackling, complicated, seemingly impossible romance.
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