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MAGAZINE
May 8, 1994
It was gratifying to see the article by Kathleen Maloney on GO, the strategic board game (Palm Latitudes, April 10). It was a little misleading, however, to indicate that only rocket engineers and professors can enjoy the occasional game of GO. It is for everyone who likes the challenge of complex board games, and players come from all walks of life. As in any game or sport, it may not be the most intelligent who wins, but the one who works and plays hardest to be a winner. BILL MACINTOSH Moreno Valley
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MAGAZINE
May 1, 1994
It was pleasant for this 75-year-old to find that the word "scissorbill" (L.A. Speak, Palm Latitudes, March 27) is still in use. It was commonly used when I was young, but when I saw that it was defined as "origin unclear," I went to the unabridged version of Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language and found: "Scissorbill/n. (trans of F. bec-en-ciseaux) 1. A skimmer. 2. chiefly West: an inferior or stupid person as a: a worker indifferent to the interests of the laboring class (as one unwilling to join a union)
MAGAZINE
April 24, 1994
If you can stand one more letter on the subject, there is an easier way to find the hidden image in a holusion print ("Picture This," Palm Latitudes, Feb. 13). Place the print behind a piece of shiny glass or plexiglass and focus on a reflection that is not too bright. On the holusion printed in the magazine, by focusing on a reflection midway across the top edge, one can also see the other hidden images of four dolphins leaping. SUSAN HIKIDA Carson
MAGAZINE
March 20, 1994
"Picture This" (Palm Latitudes, Feb. 13) was a test, right? Did I pass? What's my prize? Of course, the first thing I did was "find" the leaping dolphin in the NVision Grafix print. When I did, I couldn't believe it--the dolphin was leaping away from me "into" the page. Then, when I looked to the side and saw that you had printed the "real" picture of the dolphin, it was leaping in the opposite direction. Someone on your staff (who probably also believes there is nothing there)
MAGAZINE
February 27, 1994
A common error resulted in a confusing headline in Palm Latitudes ("Towing the Orthodox Hemline," Jan. 27). You mean toeing, not towing. Human toes are involved, not trucks. 19th-Century classrooms had cracks in the floor. Teachers would have their pupils place their toes along the cracks during spelling competitions. This method of lining up students became so prevalent that the expressions toe the line, toe the mark and even toe the crack have now become honorable parts of the American language.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 1993
We enjoyed reading your L.A. Speak column (Palm Latitudes, Oct. 3) about "Game Show Lingo" and would like to mention some more common terms and phrases that were omitted. Dumb off--When all the contestants miss an answer, requiring the host to give it to them. Pinner--A particular fact in a question that guarantees a specific answer. Kiss off--The language a host uses to say goodby to a contestant when he or she leaves the show. Schlockmeister--The company or individual broker who supplies prizes for game shows.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 1993
Callahan's Sept. 5 cartoon (Palm Latitudes) was in the worst of taste. The implication that when women say no, they sometimes mean yes is the defense for date rape and other crimes. It is wrong to encourage or promote that kind of thinking. SIMON RUBENSTEIN Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
May 23, 1993
I'm baffled by the weekly appearance of Callahan cartoons (Palm Latitudes). Any one of the daily single-panel comics in The Times' View section would be more worthy of inclusion than the poorly drawn and unfunny Callahan. BARBARA E. BLAINE Claremont
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