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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
"The advantage of not being able to produce art is that you can spend all your energy looking at art," said Don Rubell, whose family of self-confessed contemporary art fanatics is perpetually in search of the next addition to its 5,000-piece collection. Pleased to have uttered a complete sentence without being interrupted by Mera, his wife and collecting partner of nearly 45 years, he eased into a knowing smile as she jumped in to explain how their collecting obsession works.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
PALM SPRINGS - A modest little painting near the entry to the exhibition "Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966" is a harbinger of things to come. Not just for the lovely and engrossing show that unfolds in the galleries at the Palm Springs Art Museum , but for Diebenkorn's greater achievement. That came after the painter left Northern California and settled in Los Angeles, where he began the peerless "Ocean Park" abstractions. "Seated Man" was painted in 1956.
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BUSINESS
May 23, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
Palm Springs, already in the midst of a long-overdue makeover, is now scrapping an empty downtown shopping mall along once-fashionable Palm Canyon Drive, reopening some closed streets and preparing to showcase the start of its Downtown PS redevelopment. After losing its mid-century luster and enduring decades as a second-tier tourist destination, the desert city of nearly 46,000 is building again. Its target: to attract visitors to Palms Springs' burgeoning night life, art scene and retro-cool culture, supporters say. "There's been a changing of the guard," said commercial real estate broker Mark Spohn of Sperry Van Ness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
David Gilhooly, a prominent Northern California sculptor of fanciful frogs who was a founder of the Bay Area funk art movement at UC Davis in the early 1960s, has died. He was 70. He died Aug. 21 after collapsing at his home in Newport, Ore., said his wife, Camille Chang. He had recently been diagnosed with cancer. Whimsical and irreverent, Gilhooly was internationally acclaimed for his imaginative ceramic works of animals, food and other subjects. He started his career in 1962 as an assistant to sculptor Robert Arneson, who ran the freewheeling TB-9 ceramics studio at UC Davis.
HOME & GARDEN
February 6, 2010
Palm Springs Modernism Week runs Friday to Feb. 21. Events include home tours, Airstream trailer show, lectures and the opening of a John Lautner exhibit at the Palm Springs Art Museum. For a schedule and ticket information, go to www.modernismweek.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic
Steven Nash, director of the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas since 2001, has been appointed executive director of the Palm Springs Art Museum. A veteran curator and administrator who has organized dozens of exhibitions and has been second in command at the Dallas Museum of Art and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, Nash will assume his new position in April. He will succeed retiring director Janice Lyle, who has led the Palm Springs museum for 12 years. * -- Suzanne Muchnic
MAGAZINE
April 16, 2006
I enjoyed reading J.R. Moehringer's appreciation of the Frank Sinatra house ("'The House I Lived In,'" The Travel Issue, March 26). However, I was disappointed that he did not include the name of the architect who designed the building, E. Stewart Williams. All too often design is taken for granted, as if it just happened by itself, as if it sprouted from the ground or grew on a tree. Williams is featured in the documentary film "Desert Utopia: Mid-Century Architecture in Palm Springs," which premiered at the Palm Springs Art Museum a few weeks ago. Bill Stern Executive Director Museum of California Design Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2013 | McClatchy Newspapers
David Gilhooly, a prominent Northern California sculptor of fanciful frogs who was a founder of the Bay Area funk art movement at UC Davis in the early 1960s, has died. He was 70. He died Aug. 21 after collapsing at his home in Newport, Ore., said his wife, Camille Chang. He had recently been diagnosed with cancer. Whimsical and irreverent, Gilhooly was internationally acclaimed for his imaginative ceramic works of animals, food and other subjects. He started his career in 1962 as an assistant to sculptor Robert Arneson, who ran the freewheeling TB-9 ceramics studio at UC Davis.
HOME & GARDEN
February 15, 2007 | David A. Keeps, Times Staff Writer
AS the architect of the Palm Springs Art Museum, Frank Sinatra's desert house and the mountaintop station of the Palm Springs Aerial Tramway, E. Stewart Williams helped shape the look of that city. "He was an early environmentalist with his own spin on desert Modernism," says Michael Stern of the Palm Springs Modern Committee, a nonprofit preservation group that will honor Williams at 2 p.m. on Friday with a star on the city's Walk of Stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Jeremy Strick, who led Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art during a nine-year period of vibrant programming and critical acclaim but resigned in December amid a financial crisis that threatened the institution's survival, has been appointed director of the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
Palm Springs, already in the midst of a long-overdue makeover, is now scrapping an empty downtown shopping mall along once-fashionable Palm Canyon Drive, reopening some closed streets and preparing to showcase the start of its Downtown PS redevelopment. After losing its mid-century luster and enduring decades as a second-tier tourist destination, the desert city of nearly 46,000 is building again. Its target: to attract visitors to Palms Springs' burgeoning night life, art scene and retro-cool culture, supporters say. "There's been a changing of the guard," said commercial real estate broker Mark Spohn of Sperry Van Ness.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Don and Mera Rubell are known in the art world as the New York-to-Miami transplants who helped to bring the Art Basel art fair to Florida and opened a museum-like space there for their cutting-edge collection. Not so well known: their connections to California. They lived here briefly in 1969, when Don did his internship at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center before becoming a gynecologist. In 2005 and 2006 they flew from Miami to Los Angeles so often in search of new, exciting art that they called their resulting exhibition "Red Eye. " "We could have called it GPS," Mera said, laughing, remembering crisscrossing the city to reach artists' studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2012
No artists were more serious than the New York School of Abstract Expressionists. Even the word "school" carries with it something stiff and formal. Pop art, by way of contrast, was anything but solemn. If it could even be labeled a school, it would be of the variety for delinquents. "Pop! Goes the Humor," a new exhibition at the Palm Springs Art Museum (through Oct. 7), gleefully illustrates the theme of artists who don't take themselves too seriously. Originating in Britain in the 1950s, Pop really flourished in the U.S. in the following decade.
HOME & GARDEN
February 6, 2010
Palm Springs Modernism Week runs Friday to Feb. 21. Events include home tours, Airstream trailer show, lectures and the opening of a John Lautner exhibit at the Palm Springs Art Museum. For a schedule and ticket information, go to www.modernismweek.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
Jeremy Strick, who led Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art during a nine-year period of vibrant programming and critical acclaim but resigned in December amid a financial crisis that threatened the institution's survival, has been appointed director of the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Muchnic is a Times staff writer.
"The advantage of not being able to produce art is that you can spend all your energy looking at art," said Don Rubell, whose family of self-confessed contemporary art fanatics is perpetually in search of the next addition to its 5,000-piece collection. Pleased to have uttered a complete sentence without being interrupted by Mera, his wife and collecting partner of nearly 45 years, he eased into a knowing smile as she jumped in to explain how their collecting obsession works.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"This IS when I started leaving the smile behind. I felt calmer and I didn't feel the need to have all my models looking at me and blasting you with a histrionic expression." D.J. Hall is talking about "Reflection," her 2001 painting of fellow artist Candice Gawne. Neither blond nor giddy, like Hall's signature subjects, Gawne is seen in profile as if lost in thought over an afternoon cocktail.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2012
No artists were more serious than the New York School of Abstract Expressionists. Even the word "school" carries with it something stiff and formal. Pop art, by way of contrast, was anything but solemn. If it could even be labeled a school, it would be of the variety for delinquents. "Pop! Goes the Humor," a new exhibition at the Palm Springs Art Museum (through Oct. 7), gleefully illustrates the theme of artists who don't take themselves too seriously. Originating in Britain in the 1950s, Pop really flourished in the U.S. in the following decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"This IS when I started leaving the smile behind. I felt calmer and I didn't feel the need to have all my models looking at me and blasting you with a histrionic expression." D.J. Hall is talking about "Reflection," her 2001 painting of fellow artist Candice Gawne. Neither blond nor giddy, like Hall's signature subjects, Gawne is seen in profile as if lost in thought over an afternoon cocktail.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
Thanks to a gift of 543 photographs from an anonymous donor, the Palm Springs Art Museum is transforming its photography collection and expanding its exhibition program. The donation surveys camera art from the mid-19th to the late 20th centuries, with pockets of strength in early photography and Pictorialist images by artists such as Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen and Julia Margaret Cameron. It also includes views of Egypt and Palestine taken by Francis Frith in the 1850s, street scenes of early 20th century Paris by Eugene Atget, dramatically modern compositions by Edward Weston, experimental pieces by Lyonel Feininger and poetic landscapes by Harry Callahan.
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