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NEWS
April 28, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a mirage lurking in a dip in the highway, Palm Springs shimmers enticingly atop the Sonoran Desert, an impossibly green splotch on a canvas of tawny brown. Outside the city, the flat, sandy landscape is broken only rarely by scraggly tamarisk trees, yucca plants and pathetic shrubs twisted by relentless desert winds.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2009 | David Kelly
Eager to safeguard its image as an upscale tourist resort, Palm Springs is prescribing art therapy as a partial cure for downtown shops caught up in the economic doldrums. The city is expected to adopt a plan requiring vacant stores to hang paintings or photographs of old Hollywood movie stars, or come up with their own picturesque remedies to head off creeping blight in the city center. "We have more vacant storefronts than we did in the past," said City Manager David Ready.
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TRAVEL
March 1, 1998 | MICHELLE WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have taken two hours and 15 minutes to get here from the Westside. Instead, the rain, traffic and the fact that it was a Friday conspired against me. Two hours and 15 minutes into my drive, I was still on the stinkin' San Bernardino Freeway crawling at 8 mph through one of those dang Covinas. Didn't El Nino understand? I was a woman on the edge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2008 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Robert julian's little neighborhood is on the southwest side of Palm Springs, where the San Jacinto Mountains begin to rise from the desert floor like the spires of a great cathedral. Warm Sands is an older neighborhood, a mix of vintage ranches and glassy contemporaries. There are cactuses and fruit trees, a health food shop, the oldest hardware store in town and -- displayed prominently on one corner lot -- a 5-foot-tall sculpture of a phallus.
TRAVEL
December 3, 2000 | SUSAN JAMES
Deer and raccoon had left their tracks on a cushion of freshly fallen powder, and we kept an eye out for the larger prints of a mountain lion or bear. Beneath the burly branches of lodgepole pine and clusters of white fir, our breath rose in puffs of steam cut by beams of sunlight. Snow crunched beneath our feet, and only the distant voices of hikers disturbed the forest silence. It was hard to believe that this winter wilderness was only a 14-minute ride from the desert below.
TRAVEL
March 17, 1996 | MIMI AVINS, TIMES FASHION EDITOR
The 90-mile drive from Los Angeles to Palm Springs should take less than two hours, but this Friday afternoon in February the journey is unpleasantly extended by dense traffic. I have just recovered from a 2 1/2-month bout with pneumonia, an illness I describe to friends as, "So 19th century, like something out of Thomas Mann." To prolong the Mann analogy, I've decided to visit the new Givenchy Hotel and Spa. This is not a choice easily made.
TRAVEL
March 16, 1997 | JOHN MUNCIE, Formerly special projects editor for the Times' travel section, Muncie is Arts and Entertainment Editor of the Baltimore Sun
Driving down the east slope of the San Jacinto Mountains on California 74, headed toward Palm Springs, I pulled over to take a photo. It was 4:30 on a Friday; shadows filled the Coachella Valley, though the Little San Bernardino Mountains to the north shone a cheery orange. This part of Highway 74 has more curves than a sidewinder. It was the setting for the frenetic opening of the 1963 movie "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World."
TRAVEL
March 2, 2003 | Craig Nakano, Times Staff Writer
The faint trail snaked up the San Jacinto Mountains, finally reaching a rocky precipice that offered one of the best views of the city. Grass and palms blanketed square blocks below, interrupted only by parcels of stark, undeveloped desert -- a checkerboard of green and beige. Our problem: We didn't know our next move. Which way back to the car? I wanted to veer left. Todd insisted we go right. Our dog, Bailey, a lovable golden retriever-chow mix, diplomatically declined to choose sides.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investigators on Friday officially blamed defective brakes for a bus accident that killed seven people on a Girl Scout tour here last month, but said the driver might have prevented the crash had he used a lower gear while descending the steep grade where the wreck occurred. If driver Richard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A Palm Springs police officer has been put on paid administrative leave while prosecutors consider whether to charge him with rape, authorities said Friday. Anthony Pilutik, an officer on the force for the last 10 months, has been on leave since July 18 when a woman in southwest Palm Springs accused him of raping her, said Palm Springs police Cmdr. Michael McCabe. On Friday, police forwarded the result of an investigation to the Riverside County district attorney's office for review, he said.
REAL ESTATE
February 24, 2008 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
PALM SPRINGS was Hollywood's backyard in the 1930s when this home was built, but it wasn't until the late '50s that a screen star was connected with the estate. Elizabeth Taylor came onto the desert scene then and rented the home for several months from the widow of Leo Spitz, its original owner and co-founder of Universal International Studios. At the end of Taylor's stay, in 1957, she said "yes" to Mike Todd, producer of the movie "Around the World in 80 Days," and they wed in Acapulco.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2007 | Pauline O'Connor
Like Frank Sinatra, Palm Springs has fallen in and out of fashion, but never out of style. Given its desert and mountain scenery, historic architecture and bountiful shopping options, it's hard to top as a winter weekend getaway. But if you need another excuse to visit, why not plan a trip around the annual Palm Springs International Film Festival, when the town gets an infusion of Hollywood buzz and glitz, sans the attitude? Running Jan.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2007 | Scott Martelle, Times Staff Writer
Rudolph W. Giuliani is married to his third wife, his kids barely talk to him and he's comfortable with leaving intact the national policy permitting abortion. Oh -- and he's the former mayor of New York City, a modern Gomorrah to many here at the biennial conference of the National Federation of Republican Women. You'd think that Giuliani would get little more than a polite round of applause from the mostly conservative crowd of 2,000 women.
TRAVEL
August 5, 2007 | Valli Herman, Times Staff Writer
It's 102 degrees in the shade on a late July afternoon, but the staff at the Parker Palm Springs is just beginning to feel the real heat -- the kind that comes with exposure. In a few hours, the first of six episodes of "Welcome to the Parker," a reality TV show, will be broadcast on Bravo. Time for a party. The hotel cooked up a concession stand menu, tossed fat pillows on the ballroom floor and invited local media, dignitaries, eccentrics and hotel guests for a Parker-style family movie night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2007 | Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writer
What started as an attempt to thwart water thieves in Palm Springs has ballooned into a lawsuit that has stalled development and could affect how water meters are used statewide. According to the Palm Springs Fire Department, the proposed new water meters could be a safety risk if they malfunctioned in an emergency. According to the Desert Water Agency, which serves the city, the gauges, by preventing people from stealing water from unmetered lines, will keep costs down for customers.
TRAVEL
June 10, 2007 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
Looking for an inexpensive family holiday that won't be too hard on the budget? Picturesque La Quinta Resort & Club near Palm Springs is less than a gas tank away and is offering an $89-a-night summer special. The deal: The Summer Splash Family Blast special is available through Aug. 31. It includes an overnight stay in a resort casita, child's gift and a child's meal with each paid adult meal. Rates start at $89 Sundays through Thursdays; weekend rates start at $129.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2008 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
Robert julian's little neighborhood is on the southwest side of Palm Springs, where the San Jacinto Mountains begin to rise from the desert floor like the spires of a great cathedral. Warm Sands is an older neighborhood, a mix of vintage ranches and glassy contemporaries. There are cactuses and fruit trees, a health food shop, the oldest hardware store in town and -- displayed prominently on one corner lot -- a 5-foot-tall sculpture of a phallus.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the onset of Indian gambling a decade ago, this desert resort has been the nation's prize target for casino promoters, the one place with the potential to become another Las Vegas. But there was a problem--the Agua Caliente Indians, who own much of the land here, wanted no part of gambling.
SPORTS
April 9, 2007 | Daniel Wexler, Special to The Times
Desert golf. At a glance the phrase appears almost oxymoronic, conjuring up images of British expatriates blasting their way across the Outback or endless expanses of colonial African sand. But modern agronomical and engineering techniques have changed all that, making golf not only viable but a prime recreational drawing card throughout the American Southwest -- and nowhere more than in Southern California's legendary golfing mecca, Palm Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2007 | Maeve Reston, Times Staff Writer
A white supremacist gang member allegedly stabbed and seriously injured a young black man and woman behind a Palm Springs Starbucks late Thursday night, stunning the tranquil desert community, authorities said. The attack occurred after a street fight broke out just before 10 p.m., police said, when a crowd of 15 to 30 people -- divided by race -- gathered behind the coffee shop not far from Palm Canyon Drive and the city's busy weekly street fair.
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