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Palm Springs High School

NEWS
February 19, 1995 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 13 women competing in the statewide pageant--they don't say "beauty contests" anymore--strutted their stuff in the requisite evening gown competition. And they sang, danced and played musical instruments in the requisite talent competition. They fussed over one another backstage like a gaggle of sorority sisters to get their hair and makeup just right. And they rated the competition. "Boy," whispered one contestant. "Look at her legs!"
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SPORTS
July 4, 1989 | DAN LE BATARD, Times Staff Writer
Zan Mason, who usually has no trouble scoring, got only 550 of a possible 1,600 the first time he took the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Mason, an All-City 4-A player at Westchester High School, was awarded 400 of those 550 points for filling in his name and address correctly. Knowing that a National Collegiate Athletic Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2003 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
The pair of Olympic sprinters stood on the victory stand in Mexico City. As the U.S. national anthem played, each bowed his head and raised a black-gloved fist in protest of racial inequality in America. Gold medalist Tommie Smith cradled a boxed olive branch as an emblem of peace. John Carlos, third in the same 200-meter dash, wore love beads with his bronze medal. Their shoeless feet, clad in black socks, represented poverty among African Americans. The year was 1968.
SPORTS
July 8, 2008 | David Davis, Special to The Times
United they stood, two men with black-gloved fists thrust into the night. In solidarity, they bowed their heads as the national anthem played. Together, in harmonious synchronicity, they defied history. On Oct. 16, 1968, Tommie Smith and John Carlos finished one-three in the 200-meter Olympic finals. Smith set a world record in 19.83 seconds, powering through the thin air of Mexico City and across the finish line, arms upraised, with a mark that endured for 11 years. But it was their demonstration on the victory podium afterward, medals dangling around their necks, that resonates today.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | MARTIN MILLER and RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former Camp Pendleton Marine arrested in Chicago this week confessed to killing as many as eight women in Southern California and Illinois, including an Orange County college student whose death had remained a mystery for 11 years, authorities said Friday. Andrew Urdiales, 32, who served at Camp Pendleton and Twentynine Palms from 1984 to 1991, admitted to the slayings after being arrested Wednesday and charged with the slayings of two Chicago area prostitutes, police there said.
NEWS
March 22, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
The Music Center's Blue Ribbon, headed by Mrs. William Kieschnick, will get an "up close and personal look" April 1 at the behind-the-scenes luncheon with the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Members will attend the rehearsal conducted by maestro Andre Previn. A buffet luncheon with the orchestra, Previn and Ernest Fleischmann, executive director, follows in the Grand Hall of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Blue Ribbon members contribute more than $1 million annually to the Music Center Unified Fund.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | RAY RIPTON, Times Staff Writer
Since the passage of Proposition 13, many high schools have been struggling financially, and money for athletics has been hard to come by. At many Southern California high schools, booster clubs have stepped in to close the gap between the amount of money that schools can allocate to sports and other extracurricular activities and the amount that is required.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | RAY RIPTON, Times Staff Writer
Since the passage of Proposition 13, many high schools have been struggling financially, and money for athletics has been hard to come by. At many Southern California high schools, booster clubs have stepped in to close the gap between the amount of money that schools can allocate to sports and other extracurricular activities and the amount that is required.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
It was not the teachers bearing baskets of feather leis, the fanfares played on conch shells or the beating of the sacred sharkskin drum that made Hulilauakea Wilson's high school graduation so memorable. It was this: For the first time in a century, a child of the islands had been educated exclusively in his native Hawaiian language, immersed from birth in a special way of speaking his mind like a tropical fish steeped in the salt waters of its nativity. It was a language being reborn.
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