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NEWS
May 23, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Cannes Film Festival jury defied the oddsmakers on Sunday night, voting to give Apichatpong Weerasethakul's "Uncle Boonmee Recalls His Past Lives" its top prize of the Palme d'Or. A supernatural-laden drama about a dying man who takes a mystical journey, the film had won the hearts of many critics anf festival-goers when it screened last week, but most experts believed the prize would go to one of a group of Cannes veterans, including Alejandro Gonzales Inarritu, Abbas Kiarostami and Mike Leigh, all of whom had well-received films.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" does not look or sound like a film that is 50 years old. Digitally restored with unusual delicacy, it continues to charm and delight for the same reasons it did back in 1964. Winner of the Palme d'Or in Cannes and nominated for five Oscars, "Umbrellas" is a one-of-kind venture. Playing for a single week at the Nuart in West Los Angeles, this French film is unashamedly artificial yet strongly tethered to the real world of the coastal town in Normandy that gives it its name.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The French lesbian love story “Blue Is the Warmest Color” won the Palme d'Or at the Festival de Cannes. In an unprecedented step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize had been given not only to director Abdellatiff Kechiche but to costars Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux as well. The film, which French critics adored but the foreign contingent had mixed feelings about, got a rapturous reception from the Palais de Festival crowd, and both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
Australian filmmaker and former Palme d'Or winner Jane Campion has been named president of the 2014 Cannes Film Festival competition jury. Campion will lead a group that has the task of handing out the Palme and other top prizes to the approximately 20 competition films. Campion has a deep history with Cannes. She is the only female director to have won the Palme, taking the honor for "The Piano" in 1993. She appeared at the festival with her period drama "Bright Star" in 2009 and godfathered the Australian coming-of-age drama "Sleeping Beauty" two years ago. Festival director Thierry Fremaux said in a statement that Campion "is one of those directors who perfectly embody the idea that you can make films as an artist and yet still appeal to a worldwide public.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Today, right now, is Mike Leigh's moment, and "Secrets & Lies" is the reason why. Winner of the Palme d'Or at Cannes as well as the best actress award for star Brenda Blethyn, "Secrets & Lies" has created torrents of media attention (major articles in Time, Newsweek, the New Yorker, the New York Times and this newspaper) because it both sums up a career and takes it further.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2010 | Kenneth Turan, Film Critic
It was a great night for a guy named Joe, as Apichatpong Weerasethakul's "Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives," a film as wonderfully eccentric as it sounds, won the Palme d'Or at the 63rd Festival des Cannes. Thai director Weerasethakul, who tells people to call him Joe because of the difficulty Westerners have pronouncing his name, has made a one-of-a-kind dreamy ghost story about a man who is on speaking terms with all manner of supernatural beings. "This is like another world for me. This is surreal," the director said on accepting the prize at the Palais des Festivals on Sunday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The new theater owners had high-minded ambitions when they upgraded a rundown multiplex in the resort town of Palm Desert into a seven-screen theater with a French cafe and named it the Palme d'Or, after the top award at the Cannes Film Festival: to create "the desert's premiere address for cinephiles," with a wide selection of top art house, specialty and foreign films that often played only in far-off Los Angeles. And the owners themselves had impressive show business credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Martin Tsai
Writer-director Eric England's "Contracted" can best be described as "Contagion" meets "Blue Is the Warmest Color," without all those explicit sex scenes. After falling out with her girlfriend, the distraught Samantha (Najarra Townsend of "Me and You and Everyone We Know") spirals into self-destruction, albeit somewhat unintentionally. She goes to a party and very hesitantly gets wasted. Much like the heroine in that NC-17-rated French lesbian sex spectacle, Samantha switches teams and takes up with a stranger to alleviate her domestic ennui.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and Mark Olsen
TORONTO--"Blue Is the Warmest Color," the lesbian coming-of-age drama that won the Cannes Film Festival's prestigious Palme d'Or in May, is a boiling caldron of emotion and passionate arguments. The same might be said for the film's North American press tour. Just as their movie has rolled out at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals, French-Tunisian director Abdellatif Kechiche and lead actresses Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux have erupted in an unusual and extremely public feud, trading tearful recriminations and cringe-worthy denunciations.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Martin Tsai
Writer-director Eric England's "Contracted" can best be described as "Contagion" meets "Blue Is the Warmest Color," without all those explicit sex scenes. After falling out with her girlfriend, the distraught Samantha (Najarra Townsend of "Me and You and Everyone We Know") spirals into self-destruction, albeit somewhat unintentionally. She goes to a party and very hesitantly gets wasted. Much like the heroine in that NC-17-rated French lesbian sex spectacle, Samantha switches teams and takes up with a stranger to alleviate her domestic ennui.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2013 | By Amy Kaufman
This post has been updated. See below for details. Despite a running time of three hours and a NC-17 rating, the controversial French film "Blue Is the Warmest Color" got off to a solid start at the box office this weekend. Playing in limited release, the movie about a lesbian romance grossed $101,116, according to an estimate from distributor Sundance Selects. The movie was playing in two theaters in New York and two others in Los Angeles, meaning it averaged $25,279 per location.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The moral of "Blue Is the Warmest Color" is simple: Sex without love is nothing; life without love is even less. French filmmaker Abdellatif Kechiche's story of sexual awakening and real love stretches over 10 years. Loosely based on Julie Maroh's superbly illustrated graphic novel and adapted for the screen by Kechiche and Ghalya Lacroix, it traces the life cycle of a relationship beginning to end. The telling is beautiful and explicit. The truth of its emotionally raw, romantic drama is eternal and universal.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik and Mark Olsen
TORONTO--"Blue Is the Warmest Color," the lesbian coming-of-age drama that won the Cannes Film Festival's prestigious Palme d'Or in May, is a boiling caldron of emotion and passionate arguments. The same might be said for the film's North American press tour. Just as their movie has rolled out at the Telluride and Toronto film festivals, French-Tunisian director Abdellatif Kechiche and lead actresses Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux have erupted in an unusual and extremely public feud, trading tearful recriminations and cringe-worthy denunciations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
This post has been corrected, as indicated below. The French drama "Blue is the Warmest Color" won the prestigious Palme d'Or at Cannes on Sunday, making it the first graphic-novel adaptation to take the top award. Another comic-based film, Marjane Satrapi's "Persepolis," tied for the Cannes Jury Prize in 2007 . The Palme d'Or winner is based on "Le Bleu Est une Couleur Chaude" ("Blue is a Hot Color"), a graphic novel by Julie Maroh that was published in 2010 in France.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2008 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Edward Klosinski, 65, a Polish cinematographer best known for his work with Oscar-winning director Andrzej Wajda, died Jan. 5 of complications from lung cancer at his home in Milanowek, Poland. Klosinski worked on about 70 films and was a favorite cinematographer of Wajda. Their work together included "Man of Iron," which chronicled the development of the Solidarity trade union movement in Poland. The film won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1981. Klosinski once said a "good movie is more important than beautiful cinematography" -- underlining his belief that his work should serve a film's atmosphere rather than show off his talents.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
Spin the reels back for a look at some of the winners from this year's key festivals: SUNDANCE Grand Jury Prize, dramatic: "Like Crazy," directed by Drake Doremus Audience Award, U.S. dramatic: "Circumstance," directed by Maryam Keshavarz Audience Award, documentary: "Buck," directed by Cindy Meehl CANNES Palme d'Or: "Tree of Life," directed by Terrence Malick Grand Prix: "Once Upon a...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The French lesbian love story “Blue Is the Warmest Color” won the Palme d'Or at the Festival de Cannes. In an unprecedented step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize had been given not only to director Abdellatiff Kechiche but to costars Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux as well. The film, which French critics adored but the foreign contingent had mixed feelings about, got a rapturous reception from the Palais de Festival crowd, and both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
If any competitive spirit remains between directors Ang Lee and Steven Spielberg over their hard-fought contest this Oscar season, it will need to disappear quickly -- the two are about to spend a lot of time together. The “Life of Pi” helmer was one of eight film-world notables announced for Spielberg's Cannes competition jury next month, where the 2013 best director winner will join a number of past Academy Award winners and nominees. Spielberg's jury will include actors Nicole Kidman and Christoph Waltz (the latter another 2013 Oscar winner)
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