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Palo Alto Research Center

BUSINESS
July 2, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what promises to be the first major test of the Clinton Administration's much-touted "industrial policy," the Pentagon announced Friday that it will cover half the cost of a $100-million project to manufacture flat-panel display screens. AT&T Corp. and Xerox Corp., two of America's leading multinationals, and Standish Industries, a small Lake Mills, Wis.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 2001 | From Reuters
A group of researchers who foiled four copyright protection technologies in a contest launched last year by the music industry is now being asked by the record companies to suppress its findings, one of the researchers said Tuesday.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2002 | Matthew Fordahl, Associated Press
Computing pioneer Alan Kay, who was instrumental in the development of modern programming languages and graphics-based computer interfaces, has joined Hewlett-Packard Co. as a senior fellow at HP Labs. Kay, 62, will research and develop new software platforms, the company said Monday. Underlying code will be shared in the same fashion as the open-source Linux operating system. In recent years, Kay has been working on Squeak, a set of programming tools based on images rather than words.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1992 | From Associated Press
Xerox Corp. on Monday introduced software that lets people use paper to communicate with personal computers, an invention that allows long-distance computing by facsimile machine. The breakthrough product, which for the first time makes paper an interactive part of a PC, can retrieve, store, distribute and organize documents from afar, following personalized written instructions.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2000 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of engineers at three research centers claims to have defeated four key elements of the Secure Digital Music Initiative, an inter-industry effort aimed at protecting music copyright owners from digital pirates. If true, it would be another setback for a once-promising initiative by music, software and consumer electronics companies aimed at alleviating the labels' and artists' fears about "downloadable" music.
BUSINESS
April 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
A division of Xerox Corp., which invented easy-to-use personal computer tricks but never capitalized on them, on Thursday introduced software to improve popular Windows PC features. The XSoft product, Rooms for Windows, ironically elevates a technology that Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) developed in the 1970s, only to see Apple Computer Inc. and Microsoft Corp. profit from the idea.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2000 | MYLENE MANGALINDAN, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Women entrepreneurs continue to struggle to win venture capital financing because stereotypes of women as less technically savvy than men persist, said Anita Borg, president of the Institute for Women and Technology. "Women are starting something like twice as many companies as men, but the money is primarily going to companies started by men," Borg told Bloomberg Forum. The nonprofit Palo Alto institute she heads conducts research in technologies that will have a positive impact on women.
BUSINESS
October 5, 2011
Hits and misses in Steve Jobs' career (with year product was introduced): HITS Apple II (1977):   The machine that launched Apple and the personal computer industry. Apple II computers came with a keyboard, monitor and two disk drives. Macintosh (1984): With a revolutionary graphical interface and mouse, the Macintosh immediately stood out as easier to use than the command-based IBM personal computer. About 70,000 Macs sold in the first 100 days. Photos: Steve Jobs | 1955-2011 iMac (1998)
BUSINESS
March 8, 2009 | Alex Pham
The gig: President and chief executive of Broadcom Corp., the Irvine semiconductor company that supplied more than a billion chips last year for cellphones, set-top boxes, televisions, computers and the Nintendo Wii. Broadcom made $215 million in profit last year on nearly $4.7 billion in revenue. Background: McGregor, 52, was born in St. Louis and moved to California in 1974.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2001 | RICHARD VERRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of top computer scientists headed by renowned computer designer Alan Kay left Walt Disney Co. under the company's buyout program. Kay and a team of six programmers, who worked in Disney's vaunted Imagineering unit in Glendale, developed an education software system called Squeak, which allows children to create their own computer programs through games and graphics. The scientists accepted voluntary severance packages as part of the company's move to cut 4,000 jobs companywide.
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