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Palos Verdes Estates

NEWS
November 24, 1994 | JEFF KASS
A memorial to two police officers killed last February by an attempted robber during a management seminar has been approved by the Palos Verdes Estates Art Jury, ending a months of wrangling. The Art Jury, a private organization that reviews city building plans, approved the memorial Monday under the condition that two walking paths be removed and a sundial be lowered from 12 to 11 feet, said Philip J. Frengs, chairman of the memorial committee.
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NEWS
September 29, 1994
If your house is up for sale in Palos Verdes Estates, the city building inspector may soon be paying you a visit. New code enforcement guidelines were unanimously given preliminary approval by the City Council on Tuesday. City staff will now draw up the final guidelines. Previously, the city did not inspect homes that were for sale, but did require sellers to obtain a list of permits on file. One amendment proposed by Councilman William A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1995
In a ceremony marked by humor and sadness, about 100 people filled the City Council chambers in Palos Verdes Estates on Tuesday to honor two police officers killed on Valentine's Day a year ago. Capt. Michael Tracy, 50, and Sgt. Vernon Thomas Vanderpool, 57, were attending a management seminar at the nearby Torrance Holiday Inn last year when a gunman burst into the meeting room shouting, "This is a robbery!" Tracy and Vanderpool were fatally shot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1990 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As flames leaped up the tinder-dry hill behind her $3-million "dream house" Friday afternoon, Nancy Guenther could only watch helplessly as her dream seemed to slowly disappear in a thick pall of smoke. "It was so close, so close," she said, her face furrowed with worry as she surveyed the soot-coated back balcony of her new Palos Verdes Estates home. "The flames were, quite literally, in the back yard."
NEWS
October 15, 1987
Falk von Asterwerg, a German shepherd beloved and feared as a five-year veteran of the Palos Verdes Estates Police Department, died last week of an apparent heart attack. He was 9. Officer Joe Hall, 34, who was Falk's handler, said it "is like losing a member of the family, your best friend and your partner all at one time."
NEWS
December 7, 1986 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
When a Palos Verdes Drive West resident pulled out of his long driveway in the early morning darkness a week ago, his headlights illuminated something that he thought belonged in a zoo, not on a city street. What the driver saw "appeared to be a cougar," said Police Sgt. Ed Jaakola, who said a police canine officer who went out to inspect the area came across tracks that could have been made by a cougar. "But we're not experts."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1990 | TIM WATERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major issues may be scarce, but there are plenty of City Council candidates vying for election April 10 in Palos Verdes Estates and Rolling Hills. A dozen candidates are competing for six open council seats in the two Peninsula bedroom communities, where campaigning is mostly carried out at kaffeeklatsches and other informal gatherings, and the main topics revolve around how to keep the rural ambience these cities have maintained through the years. Three seats are open in each city.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
In Palos Verdes Estates, with its lush greenery and ocean-view homes, improving roads involves more than making them safer. What they look like is important, too. Take the troublesome triangle near Malaga Cove, where Palos Verdes Drives West and North join. Officials say that 32,000 cars a day pass through the triangle, whose three separate intersections are controled only by stop signs. Two people were killed there in accidents between 1981 and 1983.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1988 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
First about 30 pine trees in a neighborhood of multimillion-dollar homes in Palos Verdes Estates started to turn brown. Then property owners noticed that suspicious holes had been drilled into the trees and some chemical poured inside. Finally, came further confirmation that the 40-foot trees were victims of deliberate poisoning--a chilling anonymous letter was mailed to the owner of some of the pines, complaining of the interference with the "light, airspace and views of others."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One's home may be one's castle, but in Palos Verdes Estates, it's one's neighbors who reign over that castle's size and shape. This control has been honed over eight decades, since the meticulously planned community emerged on the hillsides of southwestern Los Angeles County. So entrenched is neighborhood resolve to preserve the country ambience and sweeping vistas that the Palos Verdes Estates Homes Assn.
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