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Panama Economy

NEWS
September 13, 1989
Stepping up its effort to force strongman Manuel A. Noriega out of office, the Bush Administration announced expanded economic sanctions against Panama. State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said the measures include withdrawing Panama's 1989 sugar quota and widening the list of Panamanian companies and individuals associated with Noriega to whom Americans will be barred from making payments.
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NEWS
September 7, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
Searching for new ways to protest Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's installation of another puppet government in Panama, the Bush Administration is exploring the possibility of imposing additional economic sanctions on the cash-squeezed Central American country.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | From The Washington Post
Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, the Panamanian strongman indicted in the United States last year on drug-trafficking charges, has opened his own bank here in what U.S. and Panamanian sources see as a move to expand military control over the economy and, possibly, corner a revived drug-money laundering business. The new Banco Institucional Patria opened to the public Jan. 16 as a general-license bank offering a variety of services.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Jose Lopez looked on dejectedly as the blackjack dealer quickly swept up the $40 in chips he had just bet. It was the seventh straight hand that Lopez, a Panamanian businessman, had lost, and he was broke. Then his frown changed to a slight, ironic smile. "Well," he said, "at least I'm helping feed the government."
NEWS
December 22, 1988 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Life is not easy for Eric A. Delvalle, Panama's president in hiding. His title is empty of honor, let alone power. His erstwhile allies would like him to leave, and his enemies would like him in jail. Now, the government is taking away his horses. Earlier this month, Gen. Manuel A.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
A high-ranking Republican senator Sunday urged continued and strengthened moves to replace Gen. Manuel A. Noriega's regime in Panama, including possible military action conducted by Central Americans "as a last resort to change the government." But Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R-Ind.) emphasized that armed force "won't work, in terms of our over-all diplomacy, unless there is broad-based support for that option with the Panamanian opposition and with Central American friends."
NEWS
April 30, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Despite the risks apparent in offering Gen. Manuel A. Noriega a foothold in or near Panama and a flexible departure schedule if he agrees to leave power, U.S. officials contend that such a deal is the best that the Reagan Administration can currently hope for. Although Washington holds in reserve some new tools that it could use to try to force Noriega to retire, there is little confidence that they would have an immediate effect, U.S. and foreign diplomats say. The ultimate tool--U.S.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
With Panama's economy a shambles and Gen. Manuel A. Noriega holding tenaciously to power, the United States is being forced to reconsider its hard-line conditions for Noriega's ouster, U.S. officials here say. No more than two weeks ago, the officials described the goals of American pressure on Panama as getting Noriega "out of uniform and out of the hemisphere." Now, the goal is expressed vaguely: "All options are on the table," said a knowledgeable U.S. official here. Another U.S.
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