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Panama Elections

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June 5, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
In Panama's continuing civil unrest, a move against opposition protesters might be described as follows: "According to the ball, Dobermans and Smurfs routed the Whitetails after Toads working for the Pineapple rounded up their leaders." This is the sort of language that reporters covering the struggle to oust strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega have grown accustomed to hearing. Without a knowledge of Panama's colorful idiom, one would be hard put to figure out what is going on.
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WORLD
May 4, 2009 | Chris Kraul
Conservative supermarket magnate Ricardo Martinelli coasted to victory in Panama's presidential election Sunday, bucking the Latin American trend of recent years that has seen leftists take power. Panama's electoral tribunal declared Martinelli the victor after counting 43% of the vote Sunday evening, saying he had an insurmountable lead: 61% to 36% over Balbina Herrera, a former housing minister and ruling party candidate.
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NEWS
March 31, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The government rejected a call by seven Latin nations to hold new elections, saying polls held last May granted the government its legitimacy. "There are not going to be new elections," a spokesman for President Guillermo Endara said. "Panama does not need to hold elections because the people decided in May of last year."
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mireya Moscoso, a secretary who married a three-time Panamanian president, became president herself Wednesday, four months before the United States is to turn over the Panama Canal to her nation. Elected on a promise of change, Moscoso emphasized how different she is from her aristocratic predecessor, Ernesto Perez Balladares, by shunning the formality of a ceremony in the National Assembly auditorium and taking the oath of office in Panama's new 20,000-seat baseball stadium.
NEWS
August 3, 1989
Mediators from the Organization of American States have launched a fourth round of talks in Panama City with Panamanian opposition and government leaders to try to end a political crisis before a constitutional deadline expires in a month. The OAS team met separately with opposition leaders and a representative of strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last May, Guillermo Endara, a rotund, affable Panamanian lawyer, ran for election as president of Panama against the hand-picked candidate of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. Independent exit polls showed he won by a margin of 3 to 1. On Wednesday, after more than seven months, Endara was sworn in--by a Panamanian judge during post-midnight ceremonies at a U.S. military base as American troops were launching their military drive against Noriega.
NEWS
July 16, 1989
The Panamanian government dominated by strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and the democratic opposition agreed to direct talks aimed at ending the country's political crisis, an international negotiating team said. Representatives of the government, the armed forces and the pro-government National Labor Coalition were to meet this afternoon with the Civil Democratic Opposition Alliance in talks that will not "exclude any subject," a four-member Organization of American States team said.
NEWS
April 28, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Thursday accused Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega of "systematic fraud" in attempting to block free elections in that country. Panama has scheduled elections May 7, but Bush said in a statement released before an appearance here that "the Noriega regime has taken steps to commit systematic fraud." "Through violence and coercion, it threatens and intimidates Panamanian citizens who believe in democracy," he said, adding that the United States "will not recognize fraudulent election results engineered by Noriega."
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ever since the late Arnulfo Arias Madrid, Panama's last honestly elected president, was deposed by the old National Guard in October, 1968, civilian government in that country has functioned as a facade for military rule. A so-called National Assembly of Representatives, a body of 510 elected community delegates, drafted a new constitution in 1972 and named a civilian to be president. But it gave dictatorial powers to Gen.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At best, the struggle is between continuity in a time of crisis and the democratic tradition of handing over the reins of government to a successor. At worst, it's about lust for power and jealousy. By Sunday, Panamanians must sort the lofty ideals from the personal ambitions to decide in a referendum whether their presidents--particularly their current president, Ernesto Perez Balladares--can run for reelection.
NEWS
May 3, 1999 | Associated Press
Mireya Moscoso, the widow of a popular leader, won elections Sunday to become the president who will lead Panama when the United States cedes control of the Panama Canal at the end of the year. She beat Martin Torrijos, the son of strongman Gen. Omar Torrijos. The late general helped depose her husband, Arnulfo Arias Madrid, from the presidency and went on to sign the 1977 Panama Canal treaties with the U.S. Martin Torrijos conceded defeat and congratulated Moscoso.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters on Sunday overwhelmingly rejected an attempt to allow Panama's presidents to seek reelection, in what observers said was a stinging defeat for the incumbent, Ernesto Perez Balladares. With 82% of the ballots counted, 62.5% were against lifting the constitutional prohibition on consecutive terms for presidents. The vote was seen as a rejection of the free-market reforms of Perez Balladares and his ruling Democratic Revolutionary Party, or PRD.
NEWS
August 29, 1998 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At best, the struggle is between continuity in a time of crisis and the democratic tradition of handing over the reins of government to a successor. At worst, it's about lust for power and jealousy. By Sunday, Panamanians must sort the lofty ideals from the personal ambitions to decide in a referendum whether their presidents--particularly their current president, Ernesto Perez Balladares--can run for reelection.
NEWS
May 10, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the end, Panamanians participating in their most open elections in decades voted for two dead men. Ernesto Perez Balladares, who won Sunday's presidential race, successfully conjured the image of military strongman Gen. Omar Torrijos, killed in a plane crash in 1981 but still a hero to the poor.
NEWS
May 9, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who U.S. troops captured and interrogated during the 1989 invasion that ousted Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega claimed victory Sunday in Panama's freest presidential elections in decades. Ernesto Perez Balladares, candidate of the political party that served as a front for Noriega's dictatorship throughout the 1980s, was leading a field of seven contenders with 52% of the vote counted, the national Election Tribunal said.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama's first presidential election since a U.S. military invasion changed the country's history has boiled down to a contest between the onetime political party of ousted Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega and salsa star Ruben Blades. The unlikely options in today's vote speak to ways Panama has changed in the five years since the invasion, and ways it has not. The elections also highlight both the success and failure of a U.S. policy designed to build democracy.
NEWS
July 29, 1987 | United Press International
A retired colonel arrested when troops stormed his home has no evidence to support accusations that Panama's military strongman masterminded assassinations and rigged elections, sources in the assistant prosecutor's office said Tuesday. Retired Col. Roberto Diaz Herrera, Panama's former No. 2 military man, was said to be in good health despite a two-hour gunfight early Monday between people at his residence and security forces.
NEWS
November 16, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Panamanians voted overwhelmingly to reject constitutional reforms favored by President Guillerm Endara, including one that would have banned the creation of an army. With 92% of the precincts reporting, 64% of the voters had rejected the reform package, with only 32% in favor. The remaining votes were ruled invalid. The balloting was widely viewed as a referendum on the president, who has been blamed for double-digit inflation and a high crime rate.
NEWS
March 21, 1992 | From Associated Press
The CIA and the Medellin cocaine cartel helped finance the successful 1984 campaign of a former Panamanian president, according to transcripts released in Manuel A. Noriega's drug trafficking trial. The judge and attorneys discussed the issue earlier in the trial during closed-door conferences. Transcripts of those sessions are censored by the U.S. Justice Department security office before becoming public.
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