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Panavision Inc

BUSINESS
September 24, 1996
Panavision Inc., the Woodland Hills company that has dominated the movie camera business for decades, plans to go public. In a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Panavision said it plans to raise about $69 million in its initial public offering. A company spokesman said the number of shares to be offered for sale and the proposed price of those shares has not been determined.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
M&F Worldwide Corp. officials paid about $200 million more than they should have for financier Ronald Perelman's majority stake in movie camera maker Panavision Inc., an investment analyst testified. Executives at M&F, in which Perelman owns a 35% stake, agreed to pay $190 million for his 83% of Panavision last year. Shareholders who sued over the purchase said it was engineered to bail the billionaire financier out of a bad investment.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2003 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Panavision Inc., the leading provider of cameras and lenses to Hollywood, said Wednesday that it named Technicolor Inc. executive Robert Beitcher as its president, effective April 14. Panavision, based in Woodland Hills, is 84% owned by billionaire financier Ronald O. Perelman, who remains its chairman and chief executive. Beitcher, 48, succeeds John Farrand, who resigned in January amid efforts by Panavision to overcome financial losses caused mainly by a heavy debt load.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1996 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panavision Inc. never met a camera problem it didn't try to solve. Take the upcoming motion picture "Titanic." Panavision engineers got together with the movie makers and designed a deep-sea camera especially for the film. But now, the motion picture camera company, a Hollywood staple for four decades, is navigating into unfamiliar and possibly treacherous waters as it prepares to sell its shares to the public for the first time.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Ronald Perelman canceled the $128-million sale of his stake in movie-camera maker Panavision Inc. to another company he controls, settling investor claims that he arranged the deal to get out of a bad investment. M&F Worldwide Inc., which is controlled by the billionaire financier, agreed to return the 83% stake in Panavision and debt that Perelman sold it in exchange for $90.1 million in cash and stock he valued at $48 million, M&F officials and shareholders said Monday. M&F shares rose $1.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Panavision Inc., the longtime supplier of motion picture camera equipment, has replaced Chief Executive William M. Campbell -- after just 10 weeks on the job. The Woodland Hills company, controlled by investor Ronald O. Perelman, said in a statement that William C. Bevins, a longtime associate of Perelman's, had replaced Campbell, the former president of Discovery Networks USA who also had been an executive at ABC, CBS and Warner Bros. Television.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1999 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shares of struggling movie camera provider Panavision Inc. plunged again Thursday, but the Woodland Hills-based company declined to comment on what, if anything, triggered the 12% drop. The stock tumbled $1.63 a share to $12.38 in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, giving the shares a 52% drubbing for all of 1998. Trading was exceptionally heavy. Panavision ordinarily is thinly traded because only 9% of its stock is publicly held, and only a few hundred shares trade on many days.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2006 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Four years ago the picture was bleak for Panavision Inc. Massive debt, bad management decisions and rapidly changing technologies threatened its stature as Hollywood's gold standard for cameras and lenses used in shooting television shows, movies and commercials. Now Panavision, whose logo on film credits has been familiar to moviegoers for decades, is regaining its focus.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine out of 10 Hollywood blockbusters end with the same three words: "Filmed in Panavision." In the 40 years since Panavision lenses were first affixed to movie cameras, the Woodland Hills-based company has become the tool of choice for top filmmakers worldwide. Its inventory of precision equipment is unrivaled. Its brand strength remains essentially unchallenged. But over the last year, Panavision Inc. hasn't performed like an industry leader. Quarter by quarter, it continues to lose money.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2003 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Billionaire dealmaker Ronald O. Perelman hit one of his first home runs by buying and later selling Technicolor Inc., the venerable movie film processor, for a fat profit in the 1980s. He pulled off a similar feat a decade later with the television-production firm New World Communications Group. Now Perelman is trying to score again in Hollywood with Panavision Inc., the dominant provider of cameras for shooting movies and TV shows.
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