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Pancreas

NEWS
November 30, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An artificial pancreas implanted in a Lake Isabella diabetic six months ago to test its safety--the first and apparently only such implant ever done in the United States--has proved so effective that surgeons Monday made a second implant in an effort to completely free the patient from insulin shots. The new implant, performed like the first at St.
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NEWS
May 14, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Physicians at St. Vincent Medical Center announced Thursday that they have begun the first U.S. human trials of an artificial pancreas that they hope will someday free diabetics from the need for insulin injections. The artificial pancreas was implanted last week in the abdomen of 38-year-old Steven Craig of Lake Isabella, who has been diabetic for more than 30 years and has been unable to work for seven years because of complications of the disease.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a discovery that could lead to a revolution in the way infants are fed, researchers have implicated exposure to a common milk protein in the first nine months of life as a major cause of insulin-dependent diabetes, which affects more than 1 million Americans. If confirmed by further studies, the controversial findings by Canadian and Finnish researchers could bring about a sharp decrease in the incidence of diabetes. About one-quarter of the population is genetically susceptible to diabetes.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A start-up research firm in Orange County has joined forces with medical giant Baxter HealthCare Corp. in the race to produce a marketable artificial pancreas, the companies announced Thursday. The $10-million joint venture would give TranCel Corp. a two-year jump in developing an artificial pancreas, an implantable biomechanical device that could actually produce insulin in the bloodstreams of diabetics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1992
San Diego's first pancreas-kidney transplant patient was released from UC San Diego Medical Center on Friday morning, three weeks after the life-saving operation was performed, hospital officials said. Michael Manley, 28, received a new pancreas and a new kidney in an eighth-hour operation March 6, hospital spokeswoman Nancy Stringer said. Manley's own kidneys and pancreas were not removed, and the transplanted organs will seek to supplement their functions, Stringer said.
NEWS
December 16, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Animal researchers reported Sunday a major advance toward the development of an artificial pancreas that could provide long-lasting therapy for diabetes--without daily insulin injections--and potentially eliminate its crippling side effects. The Massachusetts scientists devised a technique that allows them to transplant insulin-secreting pancreatic cells from cows, dogs and pigs into rats without suppressing the recipient's immune system and without fear of rejection.
NEWS
May 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
A plastic pancreas that kept diabetic laboratory animals healthy for months with automatic doses of insulin holds promise for a permanent treatment of diabetes, researchers say in a new study. Shaped like a hockey puck but slightly smaller, the two-ounce artificial pancreas houses transplanted insulin-producing cells. A unique membrane protects the cells from rejection by the immune system while allowing insulin to merge with the bloodstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An experimental transplant operation designed to free diabetics from insulin injections has produced the most promising results since the technique was developed, researchers reported last week. The procedure enabled five of nine patients to significantly reduce their need for daily insulin injections, including one 16-year-old Louisville, Ky., girl who has remained completely independent of injections for more than six months, the researchers reported. "I'm completely excited," said Dr.
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