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Panic Attacks

NEWS
December 2, 1990 | HEIDI NOLTE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of Americans are too afraid to get into their cars, shop at the mall or even venture out of the house, worried they'll suffer a panic attack. "It's a horrible feeling," said Ann, a 51-year-old Richmond real estate agent. "I feel like I'm losing control. I feel like the world around me doesn't exist and I feel like I'm going to die." Ann, who asked that her last name be withheld, said the panic attacks began when she was about 8, but she was too afraid to tell anyone.
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NEWS
September 28, 1991 | JANINE DeFAO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One in 75 Americans suffers from attacks of fear severe enough to make some believe they are having heart attacks or losing their minds, but few are correctly diagnosed or treated, a panel of experts reported Friday. Only one quarter of those who suffer from panic disorder receive proper treatment through medication or therapy, even though many have seen 10 or more doctors, the panel said at the conclusion of a three-day conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lani O'Grady played Mary, the Bradford clan's strong and self-confident eldest daughter. During the series' heyday, however, fans were unaware that O'Grady suffered panic attacks so severe that she'd frequently run to her dressing room to pop a Valium or two and once shook and cried so much during a scene that someone had to drive her home.
HEALTH
September 22, 2008 | By Samantha Schutz, Special to The Times
In the last few years, whenever I tried to talk about my experiences with an anxiety disorder, I ran into the same problem. I couldn't describe myself as having an anxiety disorder because I'd gone months without having a panic attack. And I couldn't say I used to have an anxiety disorder because I still felt its effects. Trying to find the right tense was more than just a matter of semantics. For many years, having an anxiety disorder shaped nearly every bit of my life -- where I went, who I went with, how long I stayed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
If the producers of the HBO series "Getting On" go to Costa Mesa to see Samuel D. Hunter's "Rest," the American theater might lose another talented playwright to television. This prolific dramatist's latest play, which is having its world premiere at South Coast Repertory in a finely acted production directed by Martin Benson, put me in mind of the American version of the dark British television comedy in which the old and frail are tended to by caregivers who could use some urgent care themselves.
HEALTH
March 3, 2008 | By Summer Beretsky, Special to The Times
Some people can't stand the word "irregardless." A close friend of mine cannot stand hearing the word "panty" used in the singular. My pet peeve is the misuse of the words "panic attack." My cohort of grad school classmates frequently drop the phrase when they've had a mildly difficult night putting the finishing touches on a research paper: "Oh my God, I had a panic attack when I couldn't find that 2007 Caplan article I needed to cite!" I've heard others throw it around in other trivial ways: "Oh, I'm going to have a panic attack!
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first medication for the treatment of panic disorder, a disease that will affect 3 million Americans at some point in their lives. The medication, Xanax, is made by The Upjohn Co. and was approved in 1981 for the treatment for clinical anxiety and anxiety associated with depression. Panic disorder is characterized by repeated panic attacks in which a patient is struck by intense fear.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | JOHN BARBOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every day millions of Americans live in dread fear of fear itself. In their lifetimes, 26 million will be visited by irrational terror, some by a choking, heart-racing, dizzying, paralyzing panic so severe that they think they are dying or going crazy. For some, it means insulating themselves, locking themselves up in their homes alone, or, paradoxically, making sure that they are always with someone they trust in circumstances they can trust. Each new attack reinforces the last. Dr.
SPORTS
August 15, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
Earl Campbell was the best running back I ever saw. Period. He nearly had the speed of O.J. Simpson, the power of Jim Brown and the imperviousness to pain of a hippopotamus. Put a gun on him and you had a tank. He was fearless, powerful, confident. He wasn't nifty. He didn't run around you, he ran through you. Earl Campbell's footprints were on the front of every linebacker's jersey in the conference. "I ran north and south," he says, grinning. He wouldn't run sideways to get away from a train.
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