Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPanic Attacks
IN THE NEWS

Panic Attacks

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1993 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER and Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino and was on the citizens advisory committee for the Ventura Boulevard Specific Plan.
Some business owners caught up in the recession have begun to panic and now want to gut the Ventura/Cahuenga Boulevard Corridor Specific Plan, along with its vision for the future. The plan governs development on Ventura Boulevard. Adopted in 1991, it was the result of 3 1/2 years of hard work by homeowners, elected officials and business leaders. It established rules for building height, density, setbacks, landscaping and land use for the boulevard's 17 miles.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
October 25, 1992 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Mary Rietta remembers in vivid detail her first airplane flight, a family trip to Texas to visit relatives when she was 12 years old. Soon after the boarding call, Mary bounded past the gate enroute to the plane. Then she stopped short, suddenly and inexplicably paralyzed by fear. "My family had to pry my hands away from the doorway," recalls Rietta, now a 26-year-old La Crescenta resident. "They had to drag me onto the plane."
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | JOHN BARBOUR, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Every day millions of Americans live in dread fear of fear itself. In their lifetimes, 26 million will be visited by irrational terror, some by a choking, heart-racing, dizzying, paralyzing panic so severe that they think they are dying or going crazy. For some, it means insulating themselves, locking themselves up in their homes alone, or, paradoxically, making sure that they are always with someone they trust in circumstances they can trust. Each new attack reinforces the last. Dr.
NEWS
September 28, 1991 | JANINE DeFAO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One in 75 Americans suffers from attacks of fear severe enough to make some believe they are having heart attacks or losing their minds, but few are correctly diagnosed or treated, a panel of experts reported Friday. Only one quarter of those who suffer from panic disorder receive proper treatment through medication or therapy, even though many have seen 10 or more doctors, the panel said at the conclusion of a three-day conference sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.
SPORTS
August 15, 1991 | JIM MURRAY
Earl Campbell was the best running back I ever saw. Period. He nearly had the speed of O.J. Simpson, the power of Jim Brown and the imperviousness to pain of a hippopotamus. Put a gun on him and you had a tank. He was fearless, powerful, confident. He wasn't nifty. He didn't run around you, he ran through you. Earl Campbell's footprints were on the front of every linebacker's jersey in the conference. "I ran north and south," he says, grinning. He wouldn't run sideways to get away from a train.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | HEIDI NOLTE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of Americans are too afraid to get into their cars, shop at the mall or even venture out of the house, worried they'll suffer a panic attack. "It's a horrible feeling," said Ann, a 51-year-old Richmond real estate agent. "I feel like I'm losing control. I feel like the world around me doesn't exist and I feel like I'm going to die." Ann, who asked that her last name be withheld, said the panic attacks began when she was about 8, but she was too afraid to tell anyone.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first medication for the treatment of panic disorder, a disease that will affect 3 million Americans at some point in their lives. The medication, Xanax, is made by The Upjohn Co. and was approved in 1981 for the treatment for clinical anxiety and anxiety associated with depression. Panic disorder is characterized by repeated panic attacks in which a patient is struck by intense fear.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
People who experience panic attacks are more likely than others to attempt or consider suicide, according to a new study that researchers say should prompt physicians to take more seriously an anxiety disorder afflicting millions of Americans. The study, published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, documents for the first time a direct link between suicide attempts and panic attacks--bouts of acute anxiety often accompanied by intense fears of death or madness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1989 | LESLIE BERGER, Times Staff Writer
The past year has been a turning point in the lives of Becky Rasnick and Raymond Wilson. Wilson, a 20-year-old fast-food worker, won $5.86 million in the California lottery. Rasnick, a 28-year-old Ventura homemaker, was sexually attacked on the rural path where she jogs almost every day. What brought them together was that Wilson attacked Rasnick. Now Rasnick and Wilson are confronting each other again.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|