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Paparazzi

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2008 | Martha Groves and Harriet Ryan, Times Staff Writers
The summer surf is up in Malibu, and that means competing cultures are colliding with more zest than usual: surfers who jealously guard their favorite beaches, locals who want Malibu to remain a West Coast Mayberry and younger celebrities who love to hate their attendant paparazzi. Case in point: Over the weekend, obscenities, fists and video equipment went flying in two incidents involving paparazzi, celebrities and surfers, capturing the attention of Internet junkies around the world.
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BUSINESS
May 25, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
First the flailing Facebook IPO has been blanketed in a cloud of suspicion, now Mark Zuckerberg is being accused of shortchanging his new wife, Priscilla Chan, on her wedding ring. Which is worse? "What happened to three months' salary Mark? Billionaire Zuckerberg spends an estimated $25,000 on 'simple' ruby ring for Priscilla Chan," screamed a headline in the Daily Mail. And TMZ wrote , "If Mark Zuckerberg's new wife was expecting a MASSIVE diamond on her wedding ring...she was SORELY disappointed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
A paparazzo trying to photograph and videotape actor Matthew McConaughey at the beach Saturday told police he was attacked by a mob of surfers who threw his camera in the ocean and struck him. The 29-year-old paparazzo from Santa Monica told sheriff's deputies that a large group of surfers near Paradise Cove in Malibu approached him and other paparazzi about 2 p.m. and demanded that they stop taking pictures and videotaping.
OPINION
June 10, 2007
Re "It's sprung time for Hilton," June 8 How about some real celebrity justice? Let's sentence Paris to no paparazzi for life. KATHIE MARSHALL Northridge
OPINION
December 5, 2001
"Celebrity Access Shuttered" (Nov. 30) looked at the difficulty the celebrity paparazzi are having in getting access to the stars since Sept. 11. Well, the loss to the paparazzi is a gain for the rest of us, because the only things of lower value than the inane products most stars perform in are the sycophantic media that celebrate the banalities of those same stars. Steven Stark Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2001
Two facts are closely related: Fans think baseball agent Scott Boras is the devil ("Running Down Scott Boras," by Ross Newhan, April 8) and the masses blamed the paparazzi for the death of Princess Diana. Quite simply, the public is the villain in both cases. If fans are dumb enough to spend more than $100 to take their families to a ballgame, then [baseball] owners will use that money and TV advertising revenue to bid millions for players. If fans stay home for a while, it all collapses and sanity might return.
OPINION
January 6, 2013
Re "Bieber has point on paparazzi," Column, Jan. 4 David Lazarus calls celebrity paparazzi parasites "whose sole motive is personal enrichment. " On the other hand, war journalists fearlessly put themselves in harm's way "to perform a public service and document a bona-fide news story. " I can't see celebrity photographers as any more parasitical than any other ancillary job to celebrities. How is it different than someone who sells rock T-shirts? And although war journalism can be noble, one could see a parasitical aspect to it. News organizations know war coverage sells papers and boosts viewership.
OPINION
October 18, 2005
Re "Paparazzi Flash New Audacity," Oct. 16 Don't blame the paparazzi; blame the fools who buy the magazines. Are their own lives so dull they have to read that trash? RICK LEDGER San Gabriel Re "Paparazzo Says He's a Scapegoat of Hollywood," Oct. 13 The tables are turned and photographer Todd K. Wallace doesn't want his picture taken. Just remember your own response, Mr. Wallace, the next time you force your way closer to get "just that shot" of such stars as Demi, Ashton or Paris.
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