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Paparazzi

ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
E! Entertainment is the latest to join the ranks of pop culture media outlets that have decided not to publish photos of celebrities' children taken without parental consent. The move comes just one day after pop culture site JustJared.com and celebrity magazine People made their own announcements on the matter, following a plea from actress and new mom Kristen Bell and her husband, Dax Shepard. In January, the actors urged a boycott of media that use unauthorized paparazzi photos of stars' children, dubbing them the "pedorazzi.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Barbara Walters wasted no time Monday morning on "The View" addressing reports last week stating that the 83-year-old newswoman would be retiring in May 2014. "The paparazzi were outside my home today... however, here I am, and I have no announcement to make," Walters told the audience and her co-panelists on "The View. " "But I do want to say this: that if and when I might have an announcement to make, I will do it on this program, I promise, and the paparazzi guys -- you will be the last to know.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
The nimbly conceived and constructed documentary "Sellebrity" takes a vivid look at the megabucks industry of celebrity photography through a cogent variety of lenses. It's an enjoyable snapshot that effectively explores the colliding - often complicit - worlds of fame, entertainment publicity, the public's infatuation with gossip and the dogged paparazzi at the epicenter of it all. Sadly, the recent death of L.A. photographer Chris Guerra, who was hit by an SUV after taking pictures of Justin Bieber's Ferrari, makes this exposé seem especially timely.
OPINION
June 10, 2007
Re "It's sprung time for Hilton," June 8 How about some real celebrity justice? Let's sentence Paris to no paparazzi for life. KATHIE MARSHALL Northridge
OPINION
December 5, 2001
"Celebrity Access Shuttered" (Nov. 30) looked at the difficulty the celebrity paparazzi are having in getting access to the stars since Sept. 11. Well, the loss to the paparazzi is a gain for the rest of us, because the only things of lower value than the inane products most stars perform in are the sycophantic media that celebrate the banalities of those same stars. Steven Stark Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
A paparazzo trying to photograph and videotape actor Matthew McConaughey at the beach Saturday told police he was attacked by a mob of surfers who threw his camera in the ocean and struck him. The 29-year-old paparazzo from Santa Monica told sheriff's deputies that a large group of surfers near Paradise Cove in Malibu approached him and other paparazzi about 2 p.m. and demanded that they stop taking pictures and videotaping.
OPINION
January 6, 2013
Re "Bieber has point on paparazzi," Column, Jan. 4 David Lazarus calls celebrity paparazzi parasites "whose sole motive is personal enrichment. " On the other hand, war journalists fearlessly put themselves in harm's way "to perform a public service and document a bona-fide news story. " I can't see celebrity photographers as any more parasitical than any other ancillary job to celebrities. How is it different than someone who sells rock T-shirts? And although war journalism can be noble, one could see a parasitical aspect to it. News organizations know war coverage sells papers and boosts viewership.
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2001
Two facts are closely related: Fans think baseball agent Scott Boras is the devil ("Running Down Scott Boras," by Ross Newhan, April 8) and the masses blamed the paparazzi for the death of Princess Diana. Quite simply, the public is the villain in both cases. If fans are dumb enough to spend more than $100 to take their families to a ballgame, then [baseball] owners will use that money and TV advertising revenue to bid millions for players. If fans stay home for a while, it all collapses and sanity might return.
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