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BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Douglas Hanks
MIAMI — Walk through the modern new document depository in Medley, Fla., and one thing becomes clear: Paper can be a hard habit to break. Opened 16 months ago, the facility owned by an Atlanta company employs a team dedicated to digitizing records and storing them in secure computerized archives that can scan millions of files in a moment. But that part of the business in Medley occupies a tiny portion of Recall's operation, which remains dominated by old-fashioned paperwork.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Abby Sewell and Eryn Brown
Los Angeles County supervisors ordered an audit Tuesday of how the county's Public Health Department investigates complaints about health and safety issues at nursing homes. Members of the county board sharply criticized health officials over a report that complaints were not always thoroughly investigated. An investigation by Kaiser Health News found that public health officials told inspectors to close certain cases without fully investigating them in an effort to reduce a backlog.
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NATIONAL
March 21, 2011 | By Tom Hamburger and Melanie Mason, Washington Bureau
Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty filed paperwork with federal elections officials Monday to become a formal candidate for president, the first major Republican to take that step in what is expected to be a multi-candidate field against President Obama. Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich recently announced his interest in the presidency and formed a fund to begin collecting money, but he has not yet filed a formal statement of candidacy. Pawlenty already has put together a team in Iowa and New Hampshire and has visited both states repeatedly.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
After a five-year hiring freeze, the Los Angeles Fire Department is beginning to select its next generation of firefighters, and it is finding that there is tremendous demand for the jobs. Last year, 70 open slots at the fire academy drew 13,000 applications. Some 6,500 candidates passed the written exam and were invited to submit paperwork showing they had passed the physical fitness test. With such a huge pool of applicants, the LAFD should have picked the very best - those with the highest test scores and the most training, and experience in emergency medical response, which has become a significant part of a firefighter's job. But that didn't happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2010 | Steve Lopez
When David Bloom of Los Angeles shipped to Iraq in 2005 with the U.S. Army Reserves, the last thing he expected to find there was a wife. But the first time he set eyes on an Iraqi woman named Zee, who worked for U.S. forces as a translator, Bloom told a buddy he was going to marry her one day. Marriage, as we know, can be a complicated undertaking. All the more so when international complexities and military rules are thrown in. Here now, just in time for Memorial Day, is the saga of Sgt. Bloom, 41, and 24-year-old Zee, who asked that I not use her last name because of concerns about her family's safety in Iraq.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2011 | Michael Hiltzik
We've all heard that government paperwork is a drag on productivity and a backdoor tax on the economy. Here's a case where it may actually be helping to improve people's lives. The paperwork at issue is a questionnaire of up to 38 pages nursing homes now have to fill out for every resident upon admission. The form has to be filled out again periodically during the resident's stay, and again upon the resident's discharge, no matter whether he or she is being sent home to live with family, or sent to a hospital by ambulance in the middle of the night.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2009
Re: "Billing fraud crackdown is dealt setback," Aug. 19: Workers' compensation insurers don't want to send notices to injured workers to check whether the workers received all the medical services insurers are being billed for. They say the "high cost of increased paperwork" makes sending notices "prohibitively expensive." As if billions of dollars being funneled through these insurance companies to pay fraudulent claims isn't "prohibitively expensive"? Katie MacMahon Orange
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh
For thousands of people seeking coveted spots at the Los Angeles Fire Department last year, it all came down to April 22. They had passed a written exam and a grueling physical agility test and now had to turn in their paperwork, which officials would use to help determine who got jobs. The applicants were told certificates showing they'd passed the physical fitness test "would be processed in the order it was received" beginning at 8 a.m. that day. The onslaught of records came via email and fax, but also from those who had lined up at the city's downtown personnel office to get their forms stamped.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2010 | E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
JPMorgan Chase & Co. plans to lift its 40-state freeze on home foreclosures later in November but said it would take several months to redo improperly filed paperwork. The company, the No. 3 U.S. mortgage lender, imposed the freeze on about 127,000 delinquent home loans last month to assess whether they were being handled correctly. The loans were made in states that require court orders for foreclosures and states with relatively complicated nonjudicial processes, but not in California and other states with streamlined procedures.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
After a five-year hiring freeze, the Los Angeles Fire Department is beginning to select its next generation of firefighters, and it is finding that there is tremendous demand for the jobs. Last year, 70 open slots at the fire academy drew 13,000 applications. Some 6,500 candidates passed the written exam and were invited to submit paperwork showing they had passed the physical fitness test. With such a huge pool of applicants, the LAFD should have picked the very best - those with the highest test scores and the most training, and experience in emergency medical response, which has become a significant part of a firefighter's job. But that didn't happen.
TRAVEL
February 28, 2014 | By Jill Schensul
On a recent three-week vacation, I was reminded - forced to remember, perhaps - that there are plenty of ways to save: There are cheaper alternatives or ways to get discounts for almost anything. You can even get money back on that extravagant pair of boots or replacement lens you just had to buy. Tipping: I was a waitress once, so I leave good tips. But when you're abroad, it can pay to know the customs and read the bill. In Japan and South Korea, tipping is frowned upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh
For thousands of people seeking coveted spots at the Los Angeles Fire Department last year, it all came down to April 22. They had passed a written exam and a grueling physical agility test and now had to turn in their paperwork, which officials would use to help determine who got jobs. The applicants were told certificates showing they'd passed the physical fitness test "would be processed in the order it was received" beginning at 8 a.m. that day. The onslaught of records came via email and fax, but also from those who had lined up at the city's downtown personnel office to get their forms stamped.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien and Walter Hamilton
SAN FRANCISCO - In fewer than 140 characters, or 24 words, Twitter Inc. disclosed that it was planning the highest-profile public stock offering since Facebook Inc. But that was about all it did, leaving stunned investors and analysts scrambling for nearly two weeks to find out more. Sometime this week or next, they may finally get the details as the micro-blogging service is widely expected to make public its secret filing. Twitter's "stealth IPO" has thrown the spotlight on a controversial law passed almost two years ago that rewrote the rule book for start-ups seeking to go public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
The bus driver who crashed into a wall on the 10 Freeway Tuesday night, injuring eight people, is employed by a company with a previous violation that investigators consider serious, records show. Driver Myrna Castillo works for First Transit Inc., an Ohio company that contracts with Foothill Transit to operate the agency's fleet of 314 buses, a spokeswoman said. In February, an investigator cited a First Transit driver in Texas for not carrying required medical paperwork on the bus, according to Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration records.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2013 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Two families, both loving and stable, are vying to adopt a 4-year-old girl with strawberry blond hair and large blue eyes. One is certain to be broken-hearted. The tug of war began in May 2011, when Los Angeles County child protection authorities took the girl away from her drug-addicted mother and placed her in a foster home. Five weeks later, her paternal grandparents found out and moved to get her back. But the Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services sat on the couple's paperwork for nearly a year, according to a claim they have filed against the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
Southern California Edison, majority owner of the shuttered San Onofre nuclear plant, submitted to federal regulators a draft request for a license amendment that would allow the plant to be fired back up again before summer. The plant's fate has been a subject of contention since it closed more than a year ago due to excessive wear on steam generator tubes that carry radioactive water. Edison has proposed to restart one of the plant's two units, the one at which the damage was less severe, and run it at 70% power for five months before taking it offline again for inspections.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2013 | By Andrew Khouri
It was just before Christmas when customs officials at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport discovered 18 pieces of cargo that had arrived from Rome. Labeled as human specimens, each piece came individually wrapped and were contained in three large coolers. The 18 pieces were embalmed heads - skin intact - but had an unknown destination thanks to incomplete paperwork, Mary Paleologos, spokeswoman for the Cook County medical examiner's office, told the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
All MarkAir Planes Get OK to Fly: All six of the carrier's jetliners have been cleared by the Federal Aviation Administration to resume flying, nine days after the agency grounded the discount airline because of safety concerns. None of the planes required repairs, MarkAir spokesman Tom Medland said. The last two MarkAir planes got the green light to resume service late Thursday. The other four had been cleared earlier in the week and had resumed flights to the 11 cities served by MarkAir.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - The state Assembly moved swiftly to OK the addition of $2 million to the secretary of state's budget to speed up the processing of business paperwork. The California secretary of state's office relies on a system of paper and not computerized filings for corporate, partnership and other business records that an entrepreneur must submit before hiring workers, opening doors or selling products. The $2-million appropriation bill (AB 113) was approved Monday by a 71-1 vote in the Assembly, and now must be approved by the state Senate.
SPORTS
March 15, 2013 | Wire reports
Time really is money. Nobody knows that better than Elvis Dumervil and the Denver Broncos. Dumervil found himself out of a job and the Broncos were without their best defensive end Friday afternoon after they reached an agreement on a new contract but saw it all come undone when tardy filing of the paperwork forced Denver to release him. A person familiar with the negotiations gave the Associated Press details about the confusion. The person did not want to be identified because the negotiations were not public.
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