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Paradox

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2010 | Sheri Linden
As the admiring new documentary "A Man Within" shows, the writer William S. Burroughs was a taut collection of contradictions: a critic of law-and-order jingoism who was a gun fanatic (even after killing his wife in a game of William Tell gone terribly wrong), a prescient critic of invasive psychiatry who tried every pharmaceutical known to humanity. A key figure in the Beat movement, he stood apart from his literary peers by virtue of his blue-blood background, his age (he was a generation older than Ginsberg and Kerouac)
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NATIONAL
February 13, 2014 | By David Horsey
With the American South locked in a deep freeze, you can be sure that plenty of the folks suffering through the snow and ice storms are interpreting the big chill as more proof that global warming is a hoax. “Warming?” they scoff. “How can the planet be warming when it's so darn cold?” People in other parts of the world seem to have no great difficulty understanding the science but, in the good old USA where quite a few people consider science just another political opinion, it is going to take a lot longer to get most people to accept the cold facts about a warmer world.
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NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Constitutional issues involving the separation of church and state are full of paradoxes, and Wednesday's argument in the Supreme Court over prayers at town meetings illuminated one of them. The justices were reviewing a federal appeals court's ruling that the town of Greece, N.Y., violated the establishment clause of the 1st Amendment by beginning most of its monthly meetings with explicitly Christian prayers, some of them very detailed theologically. A lawyer for two citizens who opposed the prayer - one a Jew, one an atheist - asked the court to rule that prayers at government meetings must be nonsectarian.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
For people with Type 2 diabetes who had hoped that their love handles might serve some purpose by reducing their risk of premature death, Harvard researchers have some bad news: The “obesity paradox” does not exist. “We found no evidence of lower mortality among patients with diabetes who were overweight or obese at diagnosis, as compared with their normal-weight counterparts, or of an obesity paradox,” the research team reported in a study that appears in Thursday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.
MAGAZINE
May 18, 1986 | JACK SMITH
"Why not devote a column sometime to the paradox?" asks the Rev. Vance Geier. Well, for one thing, anything as simple as the paradox is very hard to write about, the easiest things being the most difficult. If those two statements seem contradictory, I'm getting to the point. G. K. Chesterton, the British essayist and master of the paradox, observed, "It's the little things in life that are colossal."
NEWS
June 11, 1986 | JACK SMITH
In writing the other day about the oxymoron and the paradox, I did not claim to be an expert on either. Readers have alleged that I was wrong on some points, which makes me right. According to the definition I used, a paradox is "a seeming contradiction; whatever sounds impossible yet is in fact possible." For example: "Less is more." An oxymoron, as I defined it, is a very brief paradox, one usually expressed in two words, such as "honest thief."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER HAWTHORNE, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Modern architecture is growing old. The groundbreaking designers at Germany's Bauhaus began building nearly a century ago. Many landmarks of midcentury Modernism, while somewhat younger, are also showing their age, their curtain walls taking on water, their cantilevers askew. And now the most recent examples of the style, late-modern buildings from the 1960s, are nearing the half-century mark. That advancing age, in the simplest terms, means the most significant modern landmarks increasingly need protection from demolition, and even from benign disregard.
OPINION
August 19, 2009
The new General Motors poses something of a conflict of interest for taxpayers. The restructuring brokered by the Obama administration left the public owning 61% of the company, so the more profitable it becomes, the better the return will be on the public's investment. At the same time, taxpayers in the market for a car don't want to maximize their local GM dealer's profits, at least not until they drive away from the showroom. The bottom line, though, is clear: Now that we co-own GM, we're in favor of anything that boosts sales of its cars and trucks.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
The crowd standing in front of the wall-sized artwork looked mesmerized. For a split second, the 32-foot-long piece resembled an abstract painting by Ellsworth Kelly or another artist who works with grids of color. But it didn't stay that way for long. Changing constantly, it plays more like a movie that's about movement itself, generating suspense by developing and disrupting patterns of color instead of building up to car crashes. At one moment, the whole "screen" floods with orange or blue; at another it disintegrates into a field of competing hues.
NEWS
November 10, 1991
Life is full of paradoxes. I'm sure someone famous said that. Everyday paradox floats up at me from the pages of the L. A. Times. The paradox suggested by . . . "The Pregnancy Police" (is that) society seems to be quite self-righteous about controlling a woman's vices during pregnancy for the sake of the infant. At the same moment, society bats no eye at aborting the same infant for convenience. I personally don't smoke or drink, and clearly abortion is a complex issue. I'm not on any committee to stop anything, but it sure does make a person think.
NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Constitutional issues involving the separation of church and state are full of paradoxes, and Wednesday's argument in the Supreme Court over prayers at town meetings illuminated one of them. The justices were reviewing a federal appeals court's ruling that the town of Greece, N.Y., violated the establishment clause of the 1st Amendment by beginning most of its monthly meetings with explicitly Christian prayers, some of them very detailed theologically. A lawyer for two citizens who opposed the prayer - one a Jew, one an atheist - asked the court to rule that prayers at government meetings must be nonsectarian.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Ted Rall
On ce again, the MTA extends the L.A. Metro toward the airport -- and once again, it doesn't quite get to the airport. Reminds one of a famous Greek mathematical paradox. ALSO: The view from above Los Angeles Wishing for Hyperloop, betting on high-speed rail Photo essay: 10 reasons to salute L.A.'s transportation future Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
SCIENCE
July 10, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
The "faint young sun paradox" has been stumping scientists for decades, but in a new study two researchers say maybe the paradox isn't so paradoxical after all. The faint young sun paradox, or problem, was first brought to the attention of the scientific community in 1972 by Carl Sagan and George Muller. At issue were two facts that were difficult to reconcile. Fact one: The first microbial life appears in the fossil record about 3.8 billion years ago, suggesting that liquid water existed on the planet at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Bob Hicok is one of my favorite poets. Partly, it's the movement of his lines, which are both conversational and utterly unexpected, almost as if he (or we) are joining a conversation that extends beyond the framework of the poem. “My heart is cold,” he writes in “Pilgrimage,” the opening effort in his new collection “Elegy Owed” (Copper Canyon: 112 pp., $22), “it should wear a mitten. My heart / is whatever temperature a heart is / in a man who doesn't believe in heaven.” And then there's that: his unrelenting vision , a sense of the world as both utterly real and utterly elusive, and heartbreaking because we have to die. Death is at the center of Hicok's writing - not in a maudlin, self-pitying way, but rather as a vivid presence, infusing everything, even the deepest moments of connection, with a steely sense of loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2013 | By David L. Ulin
If you believe print is on the way out, Laura Miller wants you to think again. In Salon this week , she uses Simon & Schuster's recent deal with ebook phenom Hugh Howey , author of the “Wool” series, to suggest that, contrary to the myth that self-publishing represents a leveling of the playing field, many presses are thrilled to take advantage of such low-hanging fruit. “By the time a self-published author has made a success of his or her book,” Miller observes, “all the hard stuff is done, not just writing the manuscript but editing and the all-important marketing.
NEWS
August 30, 2012 | By Karin Klein
According to the most recent Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll on education, Americans are split over a lot of things about schools -- whether teachers should be evaluated in part on standardized test scores and the degree to which that should happen, whether private-school vouchers are a good idea, whether the children of illegal immigrants should be entitled to a free public education. One thing that Americans have been fairly consistent about in polls for many years, though, is that overall, they don't think very highly of public schools.
NEWS
August 14, 2013 | By Ted Rall
On ce again, the MTA extends the L.A. Metro toward the airport -- and once again, it doesn't quite get to the airport. Reminds one of a famous Greek mathematical paradox. ALSO: The view from above Los Angeles Wishing for Hyperloop, betting on high-speed rail Photo essay: 10 reasons to salute L.A.'s transportation future Follow Ted Rall on Twitter @TedRall
OPINION
February 26, 2006
The Supreme Court has now ruled that a congregation in New Mexico can use a hallucinogenic tea for religious purposes (Feb. 22), but it is still illegal to use marijuana for medical purposes. There may some interesting and important legal arguments behind this paradox, but the fact remains that the sick cannot get their drug but worshipers can. THOMAS FUCHS Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2012 | By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times
Ricardo Brizuela tasted his first s'more this summer at a campfire at Vista Hermosa Natural Park. That wasn't surprising, as Ricardo is only 8 years old. But it was also a first for his mother, who is 39. Not once in her Lincoln Heights childhood did Silvia Brizuela's family barbecue or cook out, let alone roast a marshmallow. She was an apartment latchkey kid whose parents worked long hours as a sheet-metal installer and cook at a convalescent home. "My parents were worker bees," she said.
SCIENCE
July 5, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
It's a strange paradox: Obesity is one of the main contributing factors to heart failure but, once the problem develops, obesity mitigates its effects. "Heart failure may be one of the few health conditions where extra weight may prove to be protective," said Dr. Tamara B. Horwich, a cardiologist at UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine. New research by Horwich and her colleagues quantifies the magnitude of the benefit from being overweight and for the first time shows that the effects are comparable for men and women.
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