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Paralysis

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
USC has received a $17-million federal grant for a new research center to develop high-tech medical implants to treat such ailments as blindness, paralysis and memory loss. The National Science Foundation grant, which will be announced by USC officials today, is intended to spur collaboration among the university, government and industry.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2002 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the infections and death toll attributed to West Nile virus rise by the day, federal health officials said Thursday they are reasonably certain that the virus can be spread through blood transfusions. They also warned that West Nile patients can develop a polio-like paralysis that is easily misdiagnosed and improperly treated. The new information has created urgency within the public health community to address a disease that didn't even appear in the United States until 1999.
SPORTS
December 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Swiss skier Silvano Beltrametti was paralyzed below the waist after a high-speed crash Saturday on an icy course at Val D'Isere, France, in the opening downhill of the World Cup season. Beltrametti, 22, was flown to a hospital in Grenoble and was in stable condition. He had a fractured spine and bleeding in his lungs, an official of the Swiss team said. Beltrametti finished third in a super-giant slalom race Friday at Val D'Isere.
NEWS
October 29, 2001
Michigan researchers have found the gene for a rare leg-weakening nerve disease, called hereditary spastic paraplegia, that slowly robs children of their ability to walk. As many as 20,000 Americans may suffer from the disease. The discovery should aid in diagnosis and possibly in the development of new treatments. There is no therapy now.
SPORTS
September 7, 2001 | SHAV GLICK
Speed is an addiction, and Wayne Rainey is an addict. It doesn't matter that he is paralyzed from the chest down from a motorcycle racing accident in 1993 at Italy's Misano circuit. Rainey, a three-time world Grand Prix road racing champion, was on his way to a fourth title when his bike careened out of control at 130 mph, sending him cartwheeling through the dirt and severing his spinal cord.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the assumptions underlying the election deadlock of the last three weeks is that there are no serious consequences for American foreign policy. This isn't like the Kennedy-Nixon election in 1960, so the thinking goes. Back then, America was in the midst of the Cold War and couldn't afford weeks of uncertainty about its future leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2000 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Well-wishers flooded Cal State Fullerton with phone calls and e-mails Monday offering financial assistance to a promising basketball player who was gunned down and left paralyzed after being mistaken for a gang member. Rodney Anderson, 19, was visiting his family in Los Angeles when a gang member opened fire, striking him three times. A story in Sunday's Los Angeles Times recounted Anderson's struggle to recover and his determination to walk again one day.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across France, cabbies, truck and ambulance drivers, barge captains, peasants, flower growers and members of other trades and professions joined Thursday in a common cause: an attempt to hold the country and its economy hostage. The spark is the high, and still rising, price of diesel fuel and other petroleum products.
BOOKS
August 13, 2000 | ELIZABETH DREW, Elizabeth Drew is the author of "On the Edge: The Clinton Presidency" and "The Corruption of American Politics: What Went Wrong and Why"
I At perhaps no time since the Progressive Era, lasting from the late 19th century until the onset of World War I, have prosperity and a general sense of well-being so sharply contrasted with worried, negative diagnoses of the state of our democracy. The new American dilemma presents the picture of a highly prosperous, explosively inventive nation alongside one with a new, or updated, critique of the contrasts between contemporary euphoria and certain less satisfying realities.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Art Metrano was never exactly a household name but one of those faces you'd recognize: the blustering lieutenant in the "Police Academy" movies or that zany guy who performed bogus magic tricks to the jaunty tune "Fine and Dandy"--holding out a finger on each hand and then "magically" extending two fingers on one hand and none on the other. It added up to a nice living.
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