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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
April 26, 2014 | Chris Erskine
I'm nothing if not a futurist, so as we explore here the nuances of postmodern parenting, we look ahead to what kind of parents our own offspring will one day be: well-meaning pushovers or total tyrants? "I'm going to be such a Nazi," the daughter of a co-worker announces. "I'm going to be the perfect compromise of the two," predicts my older daughter, lovely and patient and - at 30 - eager to start a family of her own. Not even a mother yet, and you can spot my daughter's maternal instincts starting to kick in, softening her feisty, bossy-pants exterior.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | JEFF MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to prevent alcohol and drug use on graduation night, Huntington Beach High School parents on Saturday put away their business suits, donned their blue jeans and took up a fistful of penny nails they will use to build a place for the graduates to party safely. The parents, many of whom are upscale professionals, have come together each Saturday since last September to remodel the high school's gymnasium to fit the senior's choice of theme for the traditional Grad Night celebration, "Jungle Safari."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District will seek the approval of parents before sending iPads home with students, under an updated policy. "That is a wonderful development," said school board member Monica Ratliff. "Parents need to be clearly notified that the device is going home, and that it will go home only if they agree to it.” Officials chose this approach in response to families who objected to earlier plans, which would have distributed tablets for home use among all students.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic
This is Beverly Hills?, I wondered, oh so many years ago when a friend took me to lunch in a sweet little house with a fireplace on South Beverly Drive. Chez Mimi later moved to Santa Monica, and Urth Caffé now dispenses soy lattes and iced green tea from that rose-covered cottage. Back then (and now), South Beverly Drive didn't seem fancy at all, more like a small-town Main Street where you'd find shops selling nightgowns and one-piece swimming suits, baseball cards and birthday gifts.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was 9:15 on the night of May 27, and Cara Vanni was chatting with a friend on the phone, just like any number of San Clemente teen-agers. Suddenly the line went dead. A minute later, strangers appeared in her bedroom doorway. "My parents brought these three people into my room," Cara, 16, recalled. "At first I thought they were old friends of the family who were about to say they knew me when I was 4. They weren't."
NEWS
May 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who abducted his two daughters 20 years ago, told them their mother was dead and made a new life for them under assumed names in Florida pleaded guilty Friday to kidnapping and was sentenced to probation and a $100,000 fine. Stephen Fagan, who could have gotten 20 years in prison, struck a plea bargain that called for five years of probation.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My parents had it pretty easy with me when I was a teenager. I was a bit of a nerd. I earned straight A's in school, ran for student government and spent much of my free time watching reruns of "Little House on the Prairie. " And they had little to complain about when it came to my friends — most of them were as straight as I was. My mom and dad considered them a positive influence. Many parents aren't nearly this lucky. Their teens run with kids who prefer partying to homework or fistfights to team sports.
HEALTH
December 26, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When your 3-year-old is throwing a tantrum in the middle of the supermarket or has poured his milk all over the floor, the urge to spank may be overwhelming. If you've ever given in to that urge, you're not alone - research shows that up to 90% of parents spank their children, at least occasionally. But does it work? And more importantly, is it harmful to kids? Once considered a fairly standard parenting practice, spanking is now opposed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychological Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I figured that teachers wouldn't let me off easy - even though my Saturday column took their side. I wrote about the recent classroom scuffle between a teacher and student at Santa Monica High, defending the teacher and listing the forces that make teaching so hard - including spineless administrators and unruly students. Still, many of the teachers I heard from last weekend had the same indignant response: What about the parents? If parents raised their children right, we wouldn't have problems on campus.
OPINION
April 24, 2014
Re "Giving parents extra skills," Column, April 19 I was happy to read about Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, or PCIT, in Sandy Banks' column, and that Los Angeles County is planning an expansion of this service. As a social worker who has worked with families striving to reunify after child-protection intervention, I have witnessed the benefit PCIT can yield in teaching essential parenting skills and empowering parents with tools to use when interacting with their children.
SPORTS
April 23, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
There was an open seat in Section 106 amid the sellout crowd at Staples Center. Row 10, Seat 14. It belonged to Mychal Thompson for Game 2 of the Clippers-Golden State Warriors playoff series. He wasn't sitting in it. One of the Lakers' radio voices, Thompson is better recognized these days as the father of Warriors shooting guard Klay Thompson. He doesn't see his son play often in person and he didn't want to sit for Monday's game. Too nervous. The elder Thompson carved out some standing room near the tunnel by the Warriors' bench.
SPORTS
April 22, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Lots of parents have viewed lacrosse as a safe alternative to playing football, but it remains a contact sport. In fact, Max Schneider, a lacrosse player from Santa Ana Mater Dei, broke his collarbone and was unconscious for a brief period after a late hit last month. That experience has caused his father, Greg, to question the rules and whether athletes are being adequately protected from late hits because the only penalty assessed was a three-minute penalty. There was no ejection.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
Debbie Rohr lives with her husband and twin teenage sons in a well-tended three-bedroom home in Salinas. The ranch-style house has a spacious kitchen that looks out on a yard filled with rosebushes. It's a modest but comfortable house, the type that Rohr, 52, pictured for herself at this stage of life. She just never imagined that it would be her childhood home, a return to a bedroom where she once hung posters of Olivia Newton-John and curled up with her beloved Mrs. Beasley doll.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Carla Hall
When 18 USC students staged a sit-in Tuesday outside the office of university President C.L. Max Nikias to protest the school's business dealings with a vendor - the parent company of which has ties to factories in Bangladesh - school officials took a tough stance. The students were told that if they didn't pipe down or get going by the end of the business day, they would be given “a letter of interim suspension,” as Ainsley Carry, the vice provost of student affairs, said later in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Adria Ponsar and her son Rhyon are huddled over a child-sized table scattered with pieces of Mr. Potato Head. She is wearing an earpiece that the 4-year-old doesn't see. Rhyon is frantically sifting through the pile for the body part he needs. On the other side of a mirrored wall, social worker Aja Bryant murmurs into a mic, coaching Ponsar through the play session with scripted precision. The mother compliments her son on handling the toy gently. Good label praise, Bryant whispers into the microphone . Good reflecting.
HOME & GARDEN
June 11, 2010 | By Lisa Boone, Times Staff Writer
When I signed up my 8-year-old son to play flag football recently, I encountered a startling statistic: 70% of kids quit youth sports by the time they are 14. When the Citizenship Through Sports Alliance came to this conclusion in 2005, it cited coaching and parents as the reasons. What it doesn't mention is how agonizing it can be for parents when a child says, "I don't want to do this anymore." The issue of kids quitting — music lessons, summer camp, sports — has long been tough on parents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999
The people who signed "Hollywood Simply Can No Longer Abdicate Its Responsibility to Kids" (Commentary, July 21) got the title wrong. It should say "Parents Can No Longer Abdicate THEIR Responsibility to Kids." No matter how violent TV, movie or game images may be, children need to be taught right from wrong. Parents have a responsibility to instill in their children, by example and education, the most basic human expectations of kindness, compassion and rejection of abhorrent behavior, so that when it occurs before their eyes (on television or in movies or games)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I figured that teachers wouldn't let me off easy - even though my Saturday column took their side. I wrote about the recent classroom scuffle between a teacher and student at Santa Monica High, defending the teacher and listing the forces that make teaching so hard - including spineless administrators and unruly students. Still, many of the teachers I heard from last weekend had the same indignant response: What about the parents? If parents raised their children right, we wouldn't have problems on campus.
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
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