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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Jim Puzzanghera
Tribune Co.'s newspaper unit will pay a dividend of up to $275 million to its parent when it is spun off later this year, according to a government filing. The new Tribune Publishing Co. will own the Los Angeles Times and seven other newspapers. Shares of the company will trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol TPUB. Details about the dividend were made public in a lengthy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission submitted late Friday. The dividend has sparked opposition from critics who say it would weigh on the company at a time of diminishing advertising revenue and intensifying digital competition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
OPINION
April 11, 2014 | By danah boyd
If you're like most middle-class parents, you've probably gotten annoyed with your daughter for constantly checking her Instagram feed or with your son for his two-thumbed texting at the dinner table. But before you rage against technology and start unfavorably comparing your children's lives to your less-wired childhood, ask yourself this: Do you let your 10-year-old roam the neighborhood on her bicycle as long as she's back by dinner? Are you comfortable, for hours at a time, not knowing your teenager's exact whereabouts?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1989 | JEFF MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to prevent alcohol and drug use on graduation night, Huntington Beach High School parents on Saturday put away their business suits, donned their blue jeans and took up a fistful of penny nails they will use to build a place for the graduates to party safely. The parents, many of whom are upscale professionals, have come together each Saturday since last September to remodel the high school's gymnasium to fit the senior's choice of theme for the traditional Grad Night celebration, "Jungle Safari."
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Aly Raisman is like many teenagers in that she can drive her parents crazy. Only Raisman is a U.S. gymnast who qualified for the all-around competition at the London Olympics. And her parents are really, really crazy. Or so it seemed to the millions of people watching the qualifying round Sunday on NBC, which had a camera and microphone isolated on Ricky and Lynn Raisman as their daughter competed on the uneven bars Sunday night. OK, so the Raismans really aren't crazy -- they were justifiably stressed out during a 40-second routine their daughter had been working toward for many years.
HEALTH
December 26, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When your 3-year-old is throwing a tantrum in the middle of the supermarket or has poured his milk all over the floor, the urge to spank may be overwhelming. If you've ever given in to that urge, you're not alone - research shows that up to 90% of parents spank their children, at least occasionally. But does it work? And more importantly, is it harmful to kids? Once considered a fairly standard parenting practice, spanking is now opposed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Psychological Assn.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic
This is Beverly Hills?, I wondered, oh so many years ago when a friend took me to lunch in a sweet little house with a fireplace on South Beverly Drive. Chez Mimi later moved to Santa Monica, and Urth Caffé now dispenses soy lattes and iced green tea from that rose-covered cottage. Back then (and now), South Beverly Drive didn't seem fancy at all, more like a small-town Main Street where you'd find shops selling nightgowns and one-piece swimming suits, baseball cards and birthday gifts.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | BRAD BONHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was 9:15 on the night of May 27, and Cara Vanni was chatting with a friend on the phone, just like any number of San Clemente teen-agers. Suddenly the line went dead. A minute later, strangers appeared in her bedroom doorway. "My parents brought these three people into my room," Cara, 16, recalled. "At first I thought they were old friends of the family who were about to say they knew me when I was 4. They weren't."
NATIONAL
April 5, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Parents, don't be rotten eggs: If your weekend plans include taking the kids to an Easter egg hunt, please stick to the sidelines -- lest you ruin it for everyone, including your kids. That's the parental takeaway after the annual Easter egg hunt in the Old Colorado City shopping district in Colorado Springs, Colo., was canceled due to safety concerns. Apparently some overly aggressive parents -- or "helicopter parents," to use the trendy term -- were determined to make sure their children got plenty of Easter eggs.  The free Easter egg hunt had been held for at least 11 years, starting as a small community get-together that also helped boost the local economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
The cellphone video from inside a classroom at Santa Monica High School went viral late last week. It showed Mark Black, a longtime teacher and wrestling coach, swatting at a student with his arms, grabbing the teenager by the thigh and then crashing into desks and the classroom wall as he tried to execute a takedown. Moments later, Black had the young man pinned to the ground. District Superintendent Sandra Lyon called the incident "utterly alarming" and acted swiftly, placing the teacher on leave pending the outcome of an investigation.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Somewhere, lost in the sleaze that all so often defines what college basketball has become, are the overlooked culprits. Mom and Dad. We in the media rant on and on about AAU coaches and summer leagues and slimeball agents (is that redundant?). We harp on coaches who cheat to get the blue-chip player and college administrators who look the other way. We make fun of the NCAA because it is so big and pompous and obtuse and full of itself and makes so much money off the pimpled backs of teenagers.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
Profit at Tribune Co., the parent of the Los Angeles Times and other newspaper, radio and television properties, fell sharply last year amid a further decline in newspaper advertising and a significant drop in earnings at its broadcast division. The Chicago media company reported net income of $241.6 million for the year, down 43% from $422.5 million in 2012. Total operating revenue fell 8% to $2.9 billion, with a 6% decline in publishing and an 11% drop in broadcasting. For the fourth quarter, revenue dropped $97 million, or 11%, to $773 million, partly because the quarter included one fewer week than the previous year's final three months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Anh Do
Orange County health officials met in an emergency session this week after the latest measles tally showed the number of cases in the county had rocketed in the last few weeks. There are now 21 confirmed cases of measles in Orange County, the most of any county in California and nearly five times the number of cases in the entire state at this time last year, health officials said. Across the state, the numbers also moved forward, climbing to 49 cases by Friday. Last year, at this time, there were only four reported in the entire state.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “U.S. schools remain plagued by racial inequity, data show,” March 23 Why blame the schools for the high rate of preschool (or any school) suspensions? The classroom must be manageable, with the teacher in control. When a child is disruptive, it takes a disproportionate amount of the teacher's time and energy and the learning environment for other children is spoiled. Because schools and teachers have no authority these days and are in fear of being sued, the recourse is to remove the disruptive child from the classroom.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: In 2007, my parents signed over their house deed to my name. Does this trigger the gift tax? They never filled out a gift tax form. Is it too late? Dad has passed on but Mom is still with us. She has Alzheimer's disease, and I have her power of attorney. Are there no taxes due because of the lifetime exclusion? Answer: Yes, a gift tax return should have been filed, but no, the gift tax itself almost certainly wasn't triggered. In 2007, each of your parents would have had to give away more than $1 million in their lifetimes before gift tax would be owed.
NEWS
May 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
A man who abducted his two daughters 20 years ago, told them their mother was dead and made a new life for them under assumed names in Florida pleaded guilty Friday to kidnapping and was sentenced to probation and a $100,000 fine. Stephen Fagan, who could have gotten 20 years in prison, struck a plea bargain that called for five years of probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
She could speak only with her eyes. But Lia Lee's life bridged worlds and changed American medicine. Lia, the subject of Anne Fadiman's 1997 book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," died Aug. 31 in Sacramento at the age of 30, after living decades longer than doctors said was possible. The immediate cause was pneumonia, although it was epilepsy and sepsis, a toxic reaction to infection, that had left her in a vegetative state for much of her life. "Medicine couldn't have kept her alive.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
Zions Bancorp, which failed a Federal Reserve test simulating a severe recession, says it has shed some high-risk holdings and will submit a beefed-up capital plan for approval. Zions said the Fed determined that its holdings of loans and securities were riskier than it had calculated, that losses on commercial mortgages would be problematic, and that its revenue would fall sharply under economic stress.  "The resubmission will contain additional actions that will further reduce risk and/or increase its common equity capital sufficient to cause Zions' capital ratios to meet or exceed the minimum capital ratios," Zions said in a statement late Thursday.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2014 | By Stuart Pfeifer
The creator of a pancake-catching game app says IHOP's parent company stole his idea and put a similar game on the chain's website. Michael Levinson sued DineEquity Inc. this week, accusing the IHOP franchiser of creating its own version of his "Pancake Pile" app after first negotiating to put his game on its website. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, accused DineEquity of violating an "implied contract" with Levinson to use his "Pancake Pile" game. DineEquity spokesman Craig Hoffman declined to comment, saying the company does not publicly discuss pending litigation.
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