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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of Louisiana vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have made his state the first to require albums with potentially offensive lyrics to carry warning stickers. Gov. Buddy Roemer, who also recently vetoed the nation's most restrictive abortion bill, announced his decision at a news conference at the Capitol in Baton Rouge attended by a cross-section of representatives from the recording industry and the head of the Parents Music Resource Center.
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NEWS
July 10, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial rap artists may have more than George Bush and Dan Quayle to fret about this election year. Now, they may have to reckon with Mary Elizabeth (Tipper) Gore. The wife of Sen. Albert Gore Jr.--the prospective Democratic vice presidential nominee--began criticizing violence and sexuality in pop music long before President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle took out after Ice-T, the rapper recently attacked for his recording of "Cop Killer."
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1985 | JOHN HORN
Controversial rock musicians Frank Zappa and Twisted Sister's Dee Snyder are expected to clash with representatives of the Parents Music Resource Center today at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing as the high-volume debate over rock 'n' roll lyrics moves to Washington. The hearing is the latest development in what has become the most publicized debate over popular music yet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of Louisiana vetoed a bill Wednesday that would have made his state the first to require albums with potentially offensive lyrics to carry warning stickers. Gov. Buddy Roemer, who also recently vetoed the nation's most restrictive abortion bill, announced his decision at a news conference at the Capitol in Baton Rouge attended by a cross-section of representatives from the recording industry and the head of the Parents Music Resource Center.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial rap artists may have more than George Bush and Dan Quayle to fret about this election year. Now, they may have to reckon with Mary Elizabeth (Tipper) Gore. The wife of Sen. Albert Gore Jr.--the prospective Democratic vice presidential nominee--began criticizing violence and sexuality in pop music long before President Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle took out after Ice-T, the rapper recently attacked for his recording of "Cop Killer."
NEWS
November 1, 1985 | Associated Press
The recording industry today agreed to place warning labels or print lyrics on album covers to aid parents who want to know if their children are buying songs with explicit references to sex or violence. The inscription will read "Explicit Lyrics--Parental Advisory." The record companies will decide what constitutes explicit. There are no guidelines. "What's explicit is explicit," said Stanley M. Gortikov, president of the Recording Industry Assn. of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1985
Congratulations on your victory, Parents Music Resource Center ("Parents Warn: Take the Sex & Shock Out of Rock," by Patrick Goldstein, Aug. 25). Now all that's left for you to do is edit Ernest Hemingway, ban Kurt Vonnegut Jr., install child-proof locks on "Grimm's Fairy Tales," abolish soap operas, "Miami Vice," football games and double beds; burn the sonnets by Shakespeare about his mistress; outlaw sex education, co-ed physical education, "Love Boat" reruns, social studies and evolution; make science fiction, biology classes, strapless prom dresses and the 6 o'clock news punishable by death; cut out the passages in your Bible that promote bigamy and incest and delete the many hundreds of phrases in there that (and I quote from the PMRC list of no-nos)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Parents Music Resource Center claims that the record industry has failed to live up to its 18-month-old agreement to label records with explicit lyrics and plans to launch a "high-intensity media campaign about so called porn-rock" unless action is taken, according to the trade paper Variety. Recording Industry Assn. of America President Jay Berman told The Times that the latest PMRC attack was "a threat" and the organization was "impatient."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1985
Parents Music Resource Center's announced intent is to pressure the music industry to label records for profanity and sexual content ("Parent Warn: Take the Sex & Shock Out of Rock," by Patrick Goldstein, Aug. 25). However, I wouldn't be surprised if certain of its members, including those whose husbands are powerful Democratic and Republican Party senators, did not have a more insidious hidden agenda--stifling the cultural and political power of rock music. Rock musicians have successfully conveyed powerful anti-political and religious establishment and pro-alternative life-style and culture messages over the last 20 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
The co-head of Virgin Records, the company whose roster includes such best-sellers as Paula Abdul, Soul II Soul and Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, says that he believes it's time for the record industry to strike back against what he perceives to be a national "witch hunt" against pop music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS
The co-head of Virgin Records, the company whose roster includes such best-sellers as Paula Abdul, Soul II Soul and Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, says that he believes it's time for the record industry to strike back against what he perceives to be a national "witch hunt" against pop music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
With the recording industry preparing its own plan for the voluntary labeling of "offensive" releases, the movement in more than a dozen state legislatures to require warning stickers on records, tapes and compact discs seems to be losing momentum. In recent weeks, warning-label proposals have been rejected or withdrawn in Arizona, Iowa, Oklahoma and Tennessee.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Gory pictures! Kinky sex! Four-letter words! Loud, hard rock! No, it's not the latest heavy-metal video in MTV's rotation. It's "Rising to the Challenge," a 26-minute home videocassette designed to help parents lead their children safely through today's mine field of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Parents Music Resource Center claims that the record industry has failed to live up to its 18-month-old agreement to label records with explicit lyrics and plans to launch a "high-intensity media campaign about so called porn-rock" unless action is taken, according to the trade paper Variety. Recording Industry Assn. of America President Jay Berman told The Times that the latest PMRC attack was "a threat" and the organization was "impatient."
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
"I am not a raunchy, inflexible prude," Mary Elizabeth (Tipper) Gore declared, setting her "World's Greatest Mother" coffee mug on her kitchen table. Gore, 38, has been called many things since she burst on the public scene a year ago, battling violence and pornography in rock music. In some wild Capitol Hill hearings, rock stars and fans--some in outlandish punk garb--squared off against a group composed mainly of government officials' wives, headed by Gore.
NEWS
November 1, 1985 | Associated Press
The recording industry today agreed to place warning labels or print lyrics on album covers to aid parents who want to know if their children are buying songs with explicit references to sex or violence. The inscription will read "Explicit Lyrics--Parental Advisory." The record companies will decide what constitutes explicit. There are no guidelines. "What's explicit is explicit," said Stanley M. Gortikov, president of the Recording Industry Assn. of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Gory pictures! Kinky sex! Four-letter words! Loud, hard rock! No, it's not the latest heavy-metal video in MTV's rotation. It's "Rising to the Challenge," a 26-minute home videocassette designed to help parents lead their children safely through today's mine field of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
With the recording industry preparing its own plan for the voluntary labeling of "offensive" releases, the movement in more than a dozen state legislatures to require warning stickers on records, tapes and compact discs seems to be losing momentum. In recent weeks, warning-label proposals have been rejected or withdrawn in Arizona, Iowa, Oklahoma and Tennessee.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1985 | JOHN HORN
Controversial rock musicians Frank Zappa and Twisted Sister's Dee Snyder are expected to clash with representatives of the Parents Music Resource Center today at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing as the high-volume debate over rock 'n' roll lyrics moves to Washington. The hearing is the latest development in what has become the most publicized debate over popular music yet.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1985
Congratulations on your victory, Parents Music Resource Center ("Parents Warn: Take the Sex & Shock Out of Rock," by Patrick Goldstein, Aug. 25). Now all that's left for you to do is edit Ernest Hemingway, ban Kurt Vonnegut Jr., install child-proof locks on "Grimm's Fairy Tales," abolish soap operas, "Miami Vice," football games and double beds; burn the sonnets by Shakespeare about his mistress; outlaw sex education, co-ed physical education, "Love Boat" reruns, social studies and evolution; make science fiction, biology classes, strapless prom dresses and the 6 o'clock news punishable by death; cut out the passages in your Bible that promote bigamy and incest and delete the many hundreds of phrases in there that (and I quote from the PMRC list of no-nos)
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