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NEWS
November 8, 1996 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks before Tuesday's election, backers of a controversial parental-rights measure in Colorado predicted that their efforts would ignite a national rebellion against meddlesome public officials and agencies. With support soaring among Coloradans before the election, organizers raised their sights to California, Texas and beyond. Sponsors in 26 states other than Colorado are pressing measures designed to establish the precedence of parents' rights in raising their children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - California may enforce a new law that prohibits mental health professionals from trying to change a minor's sexual orientation, a federal appeals court decided unanimously Thursday. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals concluded that the law does not violate the free speech rights of patients or professionals or the fundamental rights of parents. The state may prohibit treatment it deems harmful, the court said. "Without a doubt, protecting the well-being of minors is a legitimate state interest," wrote Judge Susan P. Graber, a President Clinton appointee.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Backers of a ballot measure that would require parents to be notified before an abortion is performed on a minor acknowledged Friday that the 15-year-old on which "Sarah's Law" is based had a child and was in a common-law marriage before she died of complications from an abortion in 1994.
OPINION
July 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
For at least two decades, the California family code stated that sperm donors were not to be considered the fathers of the children they helped conceive. That was supposed to protect both the men donating sperm - often anonymously and for money - and the women who used it to get pregnant but who didn't want the donor involved in the child's life. Two years ago, the code was amended to allow an exception when the donor and the woman had a written agreement to the contrary, signed before conception.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A prominent polygamist and his wife have surrendered their parental rights to two teenage daughters whose abuse allegations triggered a lengthy custody battle with the state. The girls, 17 and 14, are in foster care and have expressed a desire to be adopted. Their parents, John Daniel Kingston and Heidi Mattingly, signed orders relinquishing their rights to the teens. The couple has nine other children, all of whom are in Mattingly's custody.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The state Supreme Court ruled in Olympia that a woman who raised a child from birth while in a relationship with the girl's biological mother could seek rights as a "de facto parent," essentially creating a new class of parent in the state. "Today we hold that our common law recognizes the status of de facto parents and places them in parity with biological and adoptive parents in our state," the court, led by Justice Bobbe J. Bridge, wrote in the 7-2 decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000
An appeals court ruled Thursday that state authorities can terminate the parental rights of a gravely disabled person. The opinion by the 4th District Court of Appeal in Santa Ana clears the way for a Fountain Valley woman to proceed with the adoption of a boy whose mother is a psychiatric patient at a Norwalk mental health facility. The mother has fought the adoption, saying it would violate her rights under the Americans with Disabilities Act.
NEWS
April 1, 1987 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writers
A state judge awarded full custody of Baby M to her father Tuesday, stripping the surrogate mother of all legal parental rights in the emotional landmark custody case. Ruling that the surrogacy contract was "valid and enforceable," Superior Court Judge Harvey R. Sorkow arranged for the father's wife immediately to adopt the healthy, blue-eyed, 1-year-old infant in his chambers.
NEWS
January 1, 1996 | LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seemed too outrageous to be true: Orange County's Social Services Agency had taken a 4-year-old boy from his parents simply because their house was too messy, and an appeals court--to remedy the appalling error--was returning the child to his parents. In reversing a lower court decision, the Fourth District Court of Appeal in Santa Ana said in October that "an exposed light socket" and other "trivial" housekeeping deficiencies were not enough to remove the child from his home.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a defeat for unwed fathers, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday that a man who fathers a child with a woman who is married to someone else may be denied all legal parental rights. A man who "fathers a child with a woman married to another man takes the risk that the child will be raised within that marriage and that he will be excluded from participation in the child's life," Justice Joyce L. Kennard wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
After months of controversy, the state Board of Education set out a clear road map Wednesday to allow parents unparalleled rights to force major changes at low-performing schools. The board approved regulations clarifying the "Parent Trigger" law — the first in the nation to give parents the right to petition for new staff, management and programs at their children's schools. Organizations representing parents, teachers, school districts and other parties overcame sharp differences to reach consensus on such contentious issues as how to draw up petitions, verify parent signatures and ensure public disclosure about the petition process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2010 | Sandy Banks
I wouldn't blame this weekend's UCLA graduates if they're less than delirious with glee at their accomplishments. They entered college when the country's job growth had just barely begun to slow. They are exiting into one of the toughest labor markets the nation has seen in more than a quarter-century. Sure they're armed with diplomas from one of the country's most respected schools. But they're also carrying in their heads a long list of things they can't do and jobs they can't get. I could feel the angst in the room when I served on a panel on writing careers at UCLA's Career Week this spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2009 | Victoria Kim
Michael Jackson's mother was granted permanent custody of the singer's three children Monday, ending one of the court battles that had been brewing since the pop star's death. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Mitchell Beckloff approved the agreement reached last week by attorneys for Katherine Jackson and Debbie Rowe, mother of the two older children, in which the children will be raised by their grandmother and Rowe keeps visitation and legal parental rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2009 | Maura Dolan and Jessica Garrison
Eight years ago, Debbie Rowe, the mother of Michael Jackson's two older children, told a Los Angeles court she wanted to give them up. "These are his children . . . ," she testified. "I had the children for him. They wouldn't be on this planet if it wasn't for my love for him. I did it for him to become a father, not for me to become a mother. You earn the title 'parent.' I have done absolutely nothing to earn that title."
OPINION
October 27, 2008
Re "Not about notification," editorial, Oct. 23 The Times claims that Proposition 4 is really about turning "back the clock on abortion rights." What the proposition really does is restore parental rights. While The Times insinuates that supporters of Proposition 4 are attempting to mislead voters, what is clear is that the same social engineers who fought to make it legal for campus officials to excuse minors from school property to facilitate an abortion without so much as notifying parents (which present California law allows)
NATIONAL
October 1, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge has ruled in favor of a woman who sought parental rights to a boy and girl adopted by her former same-sex partner. Michelle Kulstad sought joint custody of the children adopted by Barbara Maniaci. "To discriminate further against Ms. Kulstad because of her sexual preference in this day and age is no different than telling a person to go to the back of the bus because of her skin color," District Judge Ed McLean ruled Monday. Attorneys for both sides have said the same-sex parental rights trial was a first for the state, whose voters in 2004 rejected same-sex marriage by about a 2-to-1 margin.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented case that raises new questions about the rights of surrogate mothers, an Orange County woman who agreed to carry another couple's child filed suit on Monday claiming she should keep the baby even though she has no genetic link to it.
NEWS
July 31, 1996 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The sign hanging on the wall at the Costa Mesa Planned Parenthood clinic is aimed especially at the nervous teenagers who often populate the waiting room. It promises them "privacy and confidentiality." Although publicly funded family planning clinics must, by law, urge minors to consult their parents about health matters, it is the pledge of confidentiality, say clinic directors, that enables millions of American teenagers to seek reproductive health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Backers of a ballot measure that would require parents to be notified before an abortion is performed on a minor acknowledged Friday that the 15-year-old on which "Sarah's Law" is based had a child and was in a common-law marriage before she died of complications from an abortion in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2007 | Adrian G. Uribarri, Times Staff Writer
George Warren didn't mind getting his 9-year-old daughter vaccinated against chickenpox. He didn't object to any of the 10 or so inoculations that California requires. But a vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts? For a preteen girl? "She's not gonna need it," said Warren, a 30-year-old land surveyor from Rescue, Calif., about 28 miles from Sacramento. "I'm a good parent. I tell her what's right and wrong."
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