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March 18, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Paris Review has named Philip Gourevitch, a staff writer at the New Yorker, as its new editor. He is only the third person to hold that position in the magazine's 52-year history but the second in two years, as the Review has struggled to move on since the 2003 death of its original leader, George Plimpton. Gourevitch, 43, replaces Plimpton's original successor, Brigid Hughes, whose one-year contract was not renewed amid widely reported conflicts over the magazine's future.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
In interviews, Peter Matthiessen always had to answer, in his correct, patrician tones, a question seldom put to other writers: Just what kind of writer, exactly, are you? The confusion was understandable. Matthiessen, the only writer to win the National Book Award in both fiction and nonfiction, was both an elegant novelist and a rugged naturalist, a traveler known for his graceful yet spare descriptions of the wildest places on Earth. Over six decades, he produced acclaimed volumes of natural history based on his treks through East Africa, New Guinea and the Amazon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Writers of literary fiction are not typically known for their fashion sense, but maybe they can learn. Or maybe the fashionable can be turned onto literary fiction, given the opportunity. Enter Barney's . It has paired the Orlebar Brown clothing line with the Paris Review and things went swimmingly. Four designer swim trunks being offered this summer are based on art from the Paris Review, particularly some vintage cover designs. The swim trunks, which Barney's writes are "tailored according to Savile Row specifications," retail for $320.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Peter Matthiessen, who died Saturday at age 86 of complications from leukemia, was complex, even contradictory, in the most compelling sense. Born into privilege, he attended Hotchkiss boarding school and Yale and founded the Paris Review in 1953 with George Plimpton and Harold L. Humes. Yet he later became a Zen monk, and in his own fashion was something of an ascetic. He was perhaps best known as a writer of nonfiction, particularly “The Snow Leopard,” the 1978 account of his trip to the Himalayas with naturalist George Schaller that won not one but two National Book Awards.
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October 20, 2006 | Peter Carlson, Washington Post
George Plimpton is dead, alas, but the magazine he founded, the Paris Review, is alive and well and resounding with the voices of Salman Rushdie, Stephen King, Joseph Stalin, a Serb terrorist, a Chinese public toilet manager and an American woman who impersonated a fictitious female impersonator.
NEWS
September 14, 1992
Harold Louis Humes, 66, novelist and a co-founder of the Paris Review literary quarterly. Humes' best-known novels included "The Underground City" in 1958 and "Men Die" in 1960. He started the magazine, with Peter Matthiessen and George Plimpton as editor, in Paris in 1951. Now published in New York, the magazine has been a showcase for such authors as Philip Roth and V. S. Naipaul. On Thursday in New York of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Paris Review, a magazine edited by George Plimpton and widely perceived as the nation's major literary quarterly, has rejected a $10,000 National Endowment for the Arts grant in the latest move in the broadening protest among artists over NEA obscenity restrictions. The publication announced Friday that it had notified the NEA last week that it would reject endowment funding this year rather than sign what artists contend is the equivalent of an anti-obscenity oath.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | David L. Ulin, Special to The Times
When George Plimpton died at 76 this past October, conventional wisdom suggested that it might mean the end of the Paris Review. The venerable journal, which Plimpton founded as a twentysomething expatriate in 1950s Paris, had just celebrated its 50th anniversary, and that seemed like a good, long run.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2003 | Mark Rozzo, Special to The Times
"There are people who would perhaps call me a dilettante, because it looks as though I'm having too much fun. I have never been convinced there's anything inherently wrong in having fun." This quote from George Plimpton appears as a kind of epigram on the late author's Web site, and it makes for a fitting postscript.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2005 | Hillel Italie, Associated Press
A year and a half after the death of longtime editor George Plimpton, the Paris Review is finding him even harder to replace than first imagined. The celebrated literary magazine, which has published fiction by Philip Roth, Jack Kerouac and V.S. Naipaul during its 52-year history, has decided to replace Plimpton's successor, Brigid Hughes. "Her contract expires March 31 and we will not renew it," said Thomas Guinzburg, president of the magazine's board of directors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Hillel Italie
Peter Matthiessen, a rich man's son who rejected a life of ease in favor of physical and spiritual challenges and produced such acclaimed works as "The Snow Leopard" and "At Play in the Fields of the Lord," died Saturday. He was 86. His publisher Geoff Kloske of Riverhead Books said Matthiessen, who had been diagnosed with leukemia, was ill "for some months. " He died at a hospital near his home on Long Island in New York. Matthiessen helped found the Paris Review, one of the most influential literary magazines, and won National Book Awards for "The Snow Leopard," his spiritual account of the Himalayas, and for "Shadow Country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In an ambitious act of reinvention, Penguin has announced that it will reissue, in new translations, all 75 of Georges Simenon's Inspector Maigret mysteries -- some of the bleakest, and best, works ever produced in the genre. The first two are out already, including “Pietr the Latvian,” originally published in 1930, the earliest book to feature the iconic Paris police inspector. Simenon, of course, was insanely prolific; in addition to his Maigret novels , he also produced 117 romans durs , or hard novels, which Luc Sante describes in a 2007 Bookforum essay as “punishing studies of human beings driven by circumstance and personality to the ends of their tethers” -- a total of 400-plus books in all. The best of these (“Red Lights,” “Dirty Snow,” as well as a number of the Maigrets)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Writers of literary fiction are not typically known for their fashion sense, but maybe they can learn. Or maybe the fashionable can be turned onto literary fiction, given the opportunity. Enter Barney's . It has paired the Orlebar Brown clothing line with the Paris Review and things went swimmingly. Four designer swim trunks being offered this summer are based on art from the Paris Review, particularly some vintage cover designs. The swim trunks, which Barney's writes are "tailored according to Savile Row specifications," retail for $320.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
George Plimpton spent a lifetime stepping into other people's shoes. It's only fitting that he's finally talking about what it was like to walk in his own. That this is possible, 10 years after his death in 2003 when Plimpton was a robust 76, is due to a treasure trove of audio, video and written archives. Filmmakers Tom Bean and Luke Poling have polished up the best of it in an engaging new documentary aptly titled "Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself. " The movie by the writing/directing pair is almost as captivating as their subject.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
George Plimpton's greatest story was his own life. There was very little the renowned journalist, writer and longtime editor of the literary journal the Paris Review didn't try. During a career that spanned the second half of the 20th century, Plimpton was a quarterback for the Detroit Lions, pitched at Yankee Stadium, sparred with Archie Moore, played the triangle with the New York Philharmonic, performed stand-up comedy, flipped on a trapeze and...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Steven Soderbergh plans to direct a 12-hour adaptation of John Barth's 1960 novel "The Sot-Weed Factor. " The book is a 768-page epic -- a satirical epic -- set on a Maryland tobacco farm in the 18th century. “I was going to do it as a movie, but I couldn't figure it out. So now I've had it adapted as 12 one-hour episodes,” Soderbergh tells Entertainment Weekly. The adaptation was done, at least in part, by James Greer, the novelist and former Guided by Voices bassist who lives in Los Angeles when not on tour with his band Détective . In 2011, in a piece about Barth for the Los Angeles Review of Books, Greer provided a window into his work on the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt, Los Angeles Times
George Plimpton's greatest story was his own life. There was very little the renowned journalist, writer and longtime editor of the literary journal the Paris Review didn't try. During a career that spanned the second half of the 20th century, Plimpton was a quarterback for the Detroit Lions, pitched at Yankee Stadium, sparred with Archie Moore, played the triangle with the New York Philharmonic, performed stand-up comedy, flipped on a trapeze and...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Pulphead Essays John Jeremiah Sullivan Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 384 pp., $16 paper Reading a great essay is like seeing a writer's brain working, ideas in motion caught by a flash of lightning. It's like sitting down with a smart college friend for a conversation that jumps and leaps and connects, in which you have to only nod and say "wow" from time to time. This is a trick, of course - essays are anything but extemporaneous - but John Jeremiah Sullivan's first collection, "Pulphead," has it all. It is thoughtful, electric and alive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
George Plimpton knew the score. A generation or so ago, the late Paris Review editor developed what he called the "Small Ball Theory" of sports writing, which posits "a correlation between the standard of writing about a particular sport and the ball it utilizes - that the smaller the ball, the more formidable the literature. " There are, he explained, "superb books about golf, very good books about baseball, not many good books about football or soccer, very few good books about basketball and no good books at all about beach balls.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
Poet and journalist Dana Goodyear perches on a swivel chair in the second-floor writing studio behind her Venice home, the windows cranked open to a gentle ocean breeze. Low rooftops and tall palm trees stretch to the horizon, and Goodyear points to an anomaly just across the alley - a faded surfboard tossed up and forgotten atop a neighbor's single-story house. Such juxtapositions appeal to Goodyear, a New Yorker magazine staff writer. And while the misplaced surfboard doesn't make an appearance in her new book of poems, "The Oracle of Hollywood Boulevard" (Norton, $25.95)
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