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NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- D esigner Hussein Chalayan, o ne of fashion's biggest thinkers, never ceases to amaze. On the runway he's shown remote-controlled dresses, collapsible wood coffee-table skirts and many more innovative designs. And on Friday he surprised us again, albeit in a much more banal way, by showing a dress with a front panel covered in rows and rows of colorful fake fingernails. It was genius in a lowbrow way -- and guaranteed to make sure everyone was paying attention at the morning show.
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NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- The beauty of Comme des Gar ç ons shows is how they make the mind wander. Whenever I see one of designer Rei Kawakubo's collections, it's like visiting a contemporary art show, one that challenges you, makes you dream, or maybe leaves you scratching your head.  The fall Comme des Gar ç ons collection was more straightforward than some of Kawakubo's recent outings. It was a meditation on knitwear, in all it's comfy, cozy, security blanket glory, as well as its camouflaging, concealing, constraining potential.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- Raf Simons showed his most dynamic and commercial Dior collection yet on Friday at Paris Fashion Week, turning the focus away from the fantasy world of the red carpet, which the brand has virtually dominated in recent years, and toward the real world. OK, so maybe that incredible pink Astrakhan coat doesn't necessarily qualify as work attire, but still, overall, there was a sense that wearability and comfort were chief concerns in this collection. City lights were the inspiration according to the show notes, but it was more about the pace of the city.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- At the Balmain show Thursday at Paris Fashion Week, designer Oliver Rousteing sent out an army's worth of cargo jackets and pants, pleated leather gladiator miniskirts with woven belts, and curve-hugging mini dresses covered in elaborate silk braid or animal prints framed by caged leather, or worked with chains or tubular gold beads. While the workmanship was stunning as usual, his take on the theme felt uninspired. And the show could have used an edit. Still, the sexy skirts and dresses will surely find favor with Balmain's celebrity fans, including Rihanna, the face of the label's spring collection, who was sitting front row. ALSO: More coverage of Paris Fashion Week First U.S. Alexander McQueen outlet to open in Cabazon Dazzling new Paris exhibit explores Dries Van Noten's inspiration  
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
"I feel a bit like a spoiled child with all these beautiful things around me," says Belgian designer Dries Van Noten, giving a tour of the spectacular new exhibition chronicling his nearly 30-year career, which opens Saturday at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris. He's referring to the wealth of artworks from the Renaissance to the present day on view as part of "Dries Van Noten: Inspirations. " The show is a tour of his creative mind, placing his runway collections in context of his many cultural reference points.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- Rick Owens sounded another call for female empowerment at Paris Fashion Week with his show Thursday, channeling the aggressive team spirit from last season's runway step dancing performance into a collection of street-tough urban uniforms modeled by every woman. The show was a performance of its own kind, with models of every age and size (shaved heads, graying locks, wrinkles and all), ready to rumble in their Rick Owens power uniforms. Curve-disguising smock dresses, coats and all-in-one jumpsuits brought to mind sports pinnies or jerseys.
NEWS
February 27, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Paris Fashion Week, which began Tuesday, is in full swing, and Los Angeles Times fashion critic Booth Moore has her stylish boots firmly on the ground and has been filing dispatches left and right. So far she reports  a dowdy-chic vibe at Alessandro Dell'Acqua's first collection for Rochas, an Op Art rave  at Dries Van Noten, and a global mash-up -- in more  ways than one -- at Jun Takahashi's cult Japanese label Undercover. [All the Rage] Wearable technology has its challenges -- and we're not just talking about making something that's functional and fashionable.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
PARIS -- Paris Fashion Week kicked off Tuesday and there is a lot to look out for this season in the fall 2014 collections. The biggest news is the debut of a new designer at luxury powerhouse Louis Vuitton. Last season, Marc Jacobs decided to leave the label to focus on his own namesake brand. His replacement is Nicolas Ghesquiere, the future-thinking designer who thrilled us with his Space Age designs at Balenciaga. Ghesquiere will present his first runway collection for Vuitton on March 5, the final day of fashion week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014
Bob Casale Guitarist with '80s group Devo Bob Casale, 61, guitarist for Devo, whose commercial success peaked in the early '80s with the MTV hit "Whip It," died unexpectedly Monday of heart failure in Marina del Rey, his brother Gerald said. Bob had recently been hospitalized because of stomach ailments, his brother said Tuesday, but had been thought to be recovering. Gerald said his younger brother was otherwise in good health and had been working on numerous Devo-related projects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Forget about tea and sympathy. How about tea and morphine? Each of the opium wars launched by France and Britain in 19th century China was less a war on drugs than a war for drugs. The imperialist adventurers were after tea and morphine, and they got what they were after. Morphine is an opiate, tea is loaded with caffeine. The thirst for both was strong in the West, and the East was their common source. A modest but absorbing print exhibition drawn from a promised gift to the UCLA Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts and newly opened at the Hammer Museum pictures one set of unintended consequences that arose in those drug wars' wake.
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